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The Collateral Ancestry 



STEPHEN HARRIS 

BORN SEPTEMBER 4, 1798 



MARIANNE SMITH 

BORN APRIL 2, 1805 



^\i^'\tmJ^ 'O. Yic(^xJxxh 3 



PHILADELPHIA 
1908 



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Geobge F. Lashkb, Pmmter 

PHlLADELPmA 

Gift 
Author 

<Par»an> 

4 Ja '09 



PREFACE. 

This book, with the Harris Record which was printed in 1903, and the 
Smith Record which was printed in 1906, completes the sketches which I 
have prepared relating to my ancestry in all its lines back to the emigration 
to this country, which occurred between 1682 and 1745. 

It will be noticed tliat so far as these sketches show I am of wholly 
British origin for several hundred years, as there are no names herein contained 
suggesting another origin, and as my people mostly come from the interior and 
Avestern part of England or Scotland, where the population has changed but 
little for a long period. 

It will of course be noticed that the sketches herein given do not, as the 
Harris and Smith records did, bring down these families to the present time, 
but only to the date at which a female member of my ancestry in each family 
married into some other family whose male descent carried down my ancestry 
a little further. 

I have information in some of these families which comes down later 
than what is herein printed, but my purpose was only to give my own line 
of descent. 

These three books contain all that I have gathered in the study of thirty- 
five 3'ears, in which I have consulted many original manuscripts and many 
books; interviewed many people, and submitted most of what I have to the 
correction of Gilbert Cope, than whom I know no one better qualified to 
speak. I have confidence that the infonnation herein contained is fairly ac- 
curate and that I have pretty well fulfilled my self-imjjoscd task of trans- 
mitting to my children wliat I have been able to discover regarding my 
ancestry. 

JOSEPH S. HARRIS. 
Reading Terminal, 

Philadelphia. 
September, 1908. 



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THE ANCESTRY C 

(Bor. 



)F 



X. 



XI. 



XII 



XIII. 



John Taylor m. June 6, 1664, Hannah Osborn 

b. 102.5 

d. IftSe d. 1688 



Isaac Taylor m. Jan., 1695, Martha Roman 

b. 1674 b. 1674 

d. May, 1728 d. Jan.. 1735 



Philip Roman m. 1669, Martha Ha 

b. 1645 

d. Jan. 11, 1730 d. 1082 



rpet 



John Worrilow m. Oct. 14, 1690, Ann Mai jg 
b. 1668 b. Aug. 

d. 1726 d. 



Rowland Parry m. 

XIV. *>• l*"''" 

d. 1737 d. 1714 



Pereifor Frazer m. 17(»0. Margaret Carlton 

b. 1667 

d. 1740 d. 1740 



John Smith m. 1713, Susanna 
XV b. 1686 b. 1691 

d. Dec. 19, 1765 d. Dec. 24, 1767 



Robert Smith m. 1712, Marv 
b. Sept. 5, 1678 
d. 1757 



Dod 



John Vaughan m. 1729, Emma Parry 
b. June 5. 1690 b. 1700 

d. May 24. 17.50 d. 1791 



XVI. 



Robert Smith m. Dee. 20, 1758, Margaret \: 
b. 1720 b. Nov. 1, 1 

d. Dec. 1803 d. March 1.' 



XVII. 



Joseph Smith 
b. Sept. 24. 1' 
d. Dec. IS. 18' 



ICVIII. 



Marianne Smi 
b. April 2, 180 
d. March 12, 1 



A.RIANNE SMITH 

!, 1805) 



Christopher Warrilow m. Margery 
d. April 4, 1605 d. 1614 



John Worrilow m. 1632, Alice 

b. 16(V4 

d. March 20. 1034 d. Nov. 28. 1691 



XI. 



Thomas Worrilow m. Aug. 17, 1663, Grace Perkes 

Baptized Dec. 20. lO.SC. 

d. May, 1709 d. 1700 



John Worrall m. 1657, Elizabeth 

b. 161S 

d. Sept. 4. 1703 d. June 13, 1670 



John Taylor m. Sept. 10, 171S, Mary Worrilow I'txker 
b. 1697 b. Jan. 9. 1692 

d. 1756 d. 1733 



George Maris iq. 16-59. Alice 

b. 1632 

d. Jan. 1.5. 170(1 d. March 11. 16Jm 



Thomas Goodwin m. 1680, Elizabeth 

b. 1650 b. 16.52 

d. d. Nov. 10. 1739 



.John Worrall m. .\pril 26. 1714. Siuali Goodwin 
b. Sept. IS, 1658 I.. 1096 

d. April 19. 1742 d. 17.55 



John Frazer m. June 16. 1735, Mary Smith 

b. Aug. 8, 1709 b. Feb. 10, 1713 

d. Sept. 7. 1765 d. July 5, 1764 



.John Taylor m. 1744. Sarah Worrall 
1). 1721 b. Sept. 19, 1722 

d. 1701 d. April 23. 1780 



Persifor Frazer m. Oct. 2, 1766, Mary Worrall Taylor 
b. Aug. 9, 1736 b. April 8, 1745 

d. .April 24. 1792 d. Nov. 30. 1830 



,7. 1800. Mary Frazer 

b. Jan. 14. 17S0 
d. Mav 23. 1862 



iril 4. 1833. Stephen Harris 
/ b. Sept. 4, 1798 

' d. Nov. 18, 1851 



XII. 



XIII. 



XIV. 



XV. 



XVI. 



XVII. 



XVIII. 



INDEX. 

PAGE PAGE 

For History of the Harris Family, see the Harris Record 1 to l'^5 

For History of the Smith Family, see the Smith Record 1 to 272 

For History of the Campbell Family, see this Record 11 to 1<> 

For History of the Bailey Family, see this Record 1 7 to 18 

For History of the Hubbard Family, see this Record 19 to 24 

For History of the Frazer Family, see this Record 25 to 66 

For History of the Vaughan Family, see this Record 67 to 72 

For History of the Taylor Family, see this Record 7o to 126 

For History of the Parry Family, see this Record 127 to 140 

For History of the Robert Smith Family, see this Record 141 to 144 

For History of the Worrall Family, see this Record 145 to 154 

For History of the Worrilow Family, see this Record 155 to 166 

For History of the Goodwin Family, see this Record 167 to 170 

For History of the Roman Family, see this Record 171 to 184 

For History of the Maris Family, see this Record 185 to 190 



10 



THE CAMPBELL FAMILY. 
GENERATION XVI. 



INDBIX MEMBER OP FAMILY. 
HO. 

1 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


BBSIDBNCB. 


XVI 

1 


John Campbell. Mary Hubbard. 


1713. 


1748. 


May 1, 1753. 


New Providence, 

Bucks Co. 



There was an emigration of Campbells from Scotland in 1685 and for 
several years thereafter to N"ew Jersey. In 1685 Lord Neil Campbell, brother 
of the Dnke of Argylc, having been implicated in some political disturbances, 
fled to East Jersey, where lie had property rights. At that distance from 
home he was not considered dangerous, and he was appointed Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor of East Jersey in 1686. 

He remained one year, but a number of his relatives, two of them being 
his sons, came out in the next few years. It may have been that .John Camp- 
bell's coming had .some connection with this emigration. All that is actually 
kno^vn is that he was born in Scotland in 1713, and emigrated while still a lad, 
possibly about 1734. No one of his family is known to have come then or after- 
wards, which looks a little as if he might have strayed from New Jersey into 
Eastern Pennsylvania. 

We first find him domiciled with Mr. William Da\aes, of near Summit 
Ridge, New Castle county, Delaware, and we are told "the father would send 
the lads — Campbell and his owai son, Samuel — to work on the farm. There 
not being sufficient work done, he determined to watch, and found the lads, 
each with a book, young Davies instructing young Campbell. Considering 
that they were but lost unto any service to be expected from them, and as 
book boys would never make farmers, he complained to the mother, an amiable, 
prudent woman, who is said to have dedicated her son to the service of God. 
She replied that if he woidd not make a farmer there was a possibility he 
would make a scholar, and by her influence her .son was sent to a grammar 
school" — the Rev. Samuel Blair's Classical School at Eagg's Manor, Chester 
county. Pa. Samuel Davies graduated there and became a preacher of great 
ability, a Doctor of Divinity and a pr("^idf'nt of the college of New Jersey at 
Princeton, where he succeeded Jonathan Edwards in 1759. He was called "the 
prince of preachers." Samuel Davies received fi'om Princeton the degree 
of A. M. in 1753. He was born November 3, 1723, and died in 1761. 

After Davies' graduation, having a predilection for young Campbell, he 
assisted him in preparing for the ministry. Campbell's studies were finished 
at the "Log College," which was founded by Rev. William Tennent in 1726, 
and presided over by him for about twenty years (he died May 9, 1746) till 
Princeton became "the best endowed and most desirable of the schools of 
theology in the vicinity of Philadelphia." The "Log College" educated some of 
the ablest ministers of the day, and it was during its time the only school south 
of New England where one could be fitted for the ministry. It stool on the "Old 

(11) 



12 THE HARRIS COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

York Eoad," half a mile below Hartsville, Bucks county, Pa. Dr. Archibald 
Alexander, in his "History of the Log College 1850," says that he knew 
of but one instance — that of David Evans — where any man not educated in 
a colleg'e was admitted to the ministry in those days. Evans was, however, 
graduated at Yale College before his admission to the ministry. 

The Log College licensed Jolm Camplxdl to preach October 14, 1747. 
He at once accepted a call to the churches of New Providence, Bucks county, 
and Charlestown, Chester county, Pa., four miles north of the Great Valley 
Church, on Pickering Creek, and was installed as their pastor October 27, 
1747. He proved himself an animated, practical and faithful preacher of the 
Gospel. While in the pulpit of the Charlestown Church commencing the morn- 
ing service, and reading the lines in the old metrical version of the 116th 

"Dear in Thy sight is Thy saint's death. 
Thy servant. Lord, am I," 

he had an a])oplectic stroke from which he soon died. He died on Tuesday, 
and his seizure was probably on the previous Sunday. He was buried at his 
home in Xew Providence. A stone slab in the graveyard of what is now called 
the North Wales Presbyterian Church covers his grave, and bears this inscrip- 

"Here lieth the body 
of Rev. John Campbell, 
who departed this life ^Liy 1, 1753, 
aged aboiTt 40 years. 
In 3'onder house I spent my breath, 
Now silent mouldering her I ly in death. 
These silent lips shall wake and yet declare 
A dread Amen to Truths they published there." 

The lines are supposed to have been written by his friend, Samuel Davies, 
and iirst used here. They were used several times afterward — once on the 
tomb of Davies' instructor, Eev. Samuel Blair, at Fagg's Manor. 

He married Alary Hub])ard soon after he was installed pastor, and at his 
death left her with two children. She married, two years later, Richard 
Richison, and her children were brought up in his household. His daughter, 
Mary, who became ilrs. William ILirris in 1780, could have had no recollec- 
tion of her father, who died when she was fourteen months old, and, so far 
as I have learned, there are no family traditions attached to his name. Several 
ponderous folios of seventeenth century divinity by English authors were pre- 
served at home when I was a Iwy, and some of them are still in existence ; 
but they are the only records of his life, or the only things that still survive 
M'hich have any relation to him. 

Richard Richison was a prominent member of St. Peter's P. E. Church. 
He died in E. Wliiteland in 171)0. 



THE campbe:.l family. 
GENERATION XVII. 



13 



INDEX 
NO. 


MBMEBB OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


XVII 

1 

2 


John Campbell. 
Mary Campbell. 


never married. 
William Harris. 


1750. 
Feb. 27, 1752. 


Apr. 24, 1780. 


Nov. 20, 1837. 


East Whiteland, 

Chester Co. 



John Campbell (XVII 1) is not known to have married. lie was a 
carpenter in Chester county. He went West about 1779, and though he was 
heard from there, he soon disappeared and nothing is known of his subsequent 
history. 

In February, 1779, he executed a power of attorney empowering his 
sister, Mary Campbell, to act for him concerning his interest in the estate of 
his uncle, Stephen Hubbard. This interest he sold to his sister Mary, January 
10, 1780. February 12, 1782, he directs Dorscy Penticost, Surveyor General, 
to give William Harris a co])y of drafts of his two tracts of land of 400 acres 
each on the west side of the River Ohio, one lying on the Mingo path, the 
other on Robinson's River, and including a mill seat, surveyed 1774. He 
also directs William Crawford to deliver to William Harris a draft of 400 
acres, surveyed in 1774, on the west side of the River Ohio in the forks of 
Half Moon Creek, within six miles of Fort Pitt. This is the last communica- 
tion from him. 

Mary Campbell (XVII 2) lived with her stepfather, Richard Richison, 
who was the next neighbor to the eastward of my gTeat-graudfather, Thomas 
Harris, but as he was a man of Tory proclivities and did not approve of his 
stepdaughter marrying a man who w^as an officer of the Revolutionary Army, 
the marriage between William Harris and Mary Campbell was made at the 
house of William's brother, John Harris, in Willistown. 

There is not much remembered about her early life. Public business 
called her husband a good deal from home and left her in charge. It may 
have been when he was in the Legislature in 1810 that she found her sons, 
William and James, fighting in the barn. She called them out, whipped them 
both, and ordered them to keep the peace. 

After her husband's death, in 1812, she still lived at the old homestead. 
It was left to his wife during her life, after which his son John was to 
inherit it. 

The first note of her character that I have heard relates to her daughter 
IMary, born 1786, died 1791, her only daughter, and very much beloved by her. 
She was taken with small-pox and was very seriously sick. At the crisis of 
her disease her mother, worn out with nursing and overcome by grief, made 
up her mind in the night that she would go out to a spot, east of the house, 



14 THE HARRIS COLLATERAL A^'CESTRY. 

that in my jouth was marked bv a large English walnut tree, and there wrestle 
with God in prayer till He should give her her child's life. On the way out 
she recovered her self-control, and recognizing that she had no right to make 
such a demand, returned to the child's bedside and watched her die. 

At another time she had a servant in the house who was a child of worth- 
less parents. As she sat one day at her sewing she looked up suddenly from 
her work and exclaimed, "Mrs. Harris, my mother can put a spell on you," 
to which Mrs. Harris replied only, ''You go on with yoiir sewing." "But 
she can," the girl jx>rsisted, "and so can I." She was again told to attend to 
her work ; but Mrs. Harris soon began to have strange feelings which she could 
not conquer, fight against them as she would ; one physical symptom being as 
if a strong spider's web was being drawn over her face. As she feared that 
she was Ix'ing worsted she, as she was wont to do in difficulties, retired to her 
room to seek help in prayer, and asked that if the child were really possessed 
of the devil the Lord would in some way remove her. Her mind quieted by 
prayer, she returned do^^^l stairs, when a knock at the door announced the 
girl's father, who said that he had concluded that they wanted her at home, 
and had come to take her away. 

Mrs. Harris was a woman of great physical vigor, and she had a strong 
mind and strong religious faith. The story is told for whatever it signifies. 

A picture renmins of her which was painted when she was perhaps sixty- 
five years of age, say in 1817. It is said to be a fair likeness. It was painted 
by a travelling painter, who in some way persuaded her to sit for it, though 
she gave the matter such little heed that she sat for it in her ordinary dress. 
She was tall and not specially handsome, having in her later days a large nose 
and deep set eyes. She had plentiful chestnut brown hair, which, to the day 
of her death, was but slightly tinged with gray. 

She kept house alone when her youngest son, Stephen, first started to 
practice medicine in the neighborhood of his brother William, about six miles 
east of the old homestead ; but either because his mother wished it, or because 
it promised a better business opening, he removed to her house and spent the 
rest of her life with her. 

After his nuirriage, in 1833, Stephen's wife took charge of the house, 
relieving her mother-in-law. 

Being of very affectionate nature, her solicitude for her sons continued 
till they were middle-aged men. When drinking the sparkling water from the 
spring which supplied her house, she would often say, "I never drink this 
without thinking of the vile water John has to drink on shipboard," 
John being an officer of the U. S. Marine Corps and much at sea. The 
numerous letters from her sons remain to testify to the respect and affection 
they felt for her. In her last years she grew childish, but was not troublesome 
nor unreasonable, though somewhat headstrong. 

Her son Stephen had procured for her bedroom, which was the southwest 
comer room in the second story, the earliest form of an anthracite heating 



THE CAMPBELL FAMILY. 15 

stove, which, from its inventor, was called the "Nott" stove. lie always 
arranged the dampers before going to bed and insisted that she should not dis- 
turb them, as the stove would throw out gas if they were improperly set. One 
morning he found the dampers wrongly turned, the room full of gas and his 
mother dead ; but whether from the effect of the gas or from natural causes, 
such as a stroke of apoplexy, is not known. 

During her lifetime several of her grandchildren, the children of Camp- 
bell and William, lived with her and were educated at the Chester County 
Academy. Levi Bull Smith, a cousin of my mother's, also lived with her for 
two years, about 1820, and studied at the academy. It was doubtless the way 
in which persons sought an education for their children in those days, when 
good schools were rare, to send them to live with their friends. Thomas and 
William Harris were so educated at the Brandywine Academy, living at their 
Aunt Betsy Macelduff's before the Chester County Academy was built. 

She lies beside her husband in the churchyard of the Great Valley Pres- 
byterian Church. Her tombstone bears the inscription: 

"To the memory 

of 

Mrs. Mary Harris, 

daughter of the 

Revd. John Campbell, 

and relict of 
Gen. William Harris, 

who died 

November 26, 1837, 

aged 

eighty-five years." 



I have a distinct recollection of my grandmother, though I was less than 
nineteen months old when she died. I was concerned with her in a transaction 
for which I was blamed, and the memory of it is still clear to me. 

For an account of her husband, William Harris, see Harris record. 



16 



THE 3IAEEIS COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 
GENERATION XVIII. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILT. 



MARSIAOE. 



BBSIDENCE. 



The Children of Maby Campbell (XVII 2) and Wiluam Habbis. 



XVIII 














1 


Campbell Harris. 


Jane Lee. 


May 2, 17S1. 


1808. 


May 17, 1853. 


Geneseo, N. Y. 


2 


Thomas Harris. 


I. Jane Phillips 














Hodgdon. 


Jan. 3, 1784. 


I. Jan., 1820. 


Mar. 4, 1861. 


Philadelphia, Pa 






II. Esther White 














Macpherson. 




II. Apr.30,1839. 






4 


Mary Harris. 




Oct. 1.^., 1780. 




Mav 20, 1791. 




3 


John Harris. 


I. Mary Forster. 
II. Mary Gilliat 

Gray. 


May 20, 17S9. 


I. Oct. 28,1819. 
II. Oct., 1845. 


May 12, 1864. 


Washington, D. G. 


5 


SVilliam Harris. 


Elizabeth Matilda 










6 


James Bailey 

Harris. 


Patterson. 


Aug. 18, 1792. 


Apr. 20, 1820. 


Mar. 3, 1801. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Maria Driesbach. 


Oct. 14. 179.5. 


Apr. 10, 1838. 


June 23. ISSl. 


Geneseo, N. Y. 


7 


Stephen Harris. 


Marianne Smith. 


Sept. 4. 1798. 


Apr. 4, 1833. 


Nov. 18, 1851. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 



For notes on the lives of the children of Mary Campbell and William Harris 

see the Harris record. 



riiE r'A^tiTiKi,!. FA:iin,v. 



NOTES. 



THE CAMPBET.T. FAiflLY. 



NOTES. 



THE CAT^rrBF.Li. fa:viily. 



NOTES. 



TlIF, rA:MPBKl.T, FA:\riT,Y. 



KOTES. 



THE BAILEY FAMILY. 



17 



THE BAILEY FAMILY. 
GENERATION XV. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MBMBEIB OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE!. 


DEATH. RESIDBNCH. 


XV 

1 

o 
3 


Alexander Baillie. 
William W. Baillie. 
Edward Bayley. 


Margaret Feogan. 


about 1695. 


about 171S. 


Apr., 1758. Willistown, Pa. 

about 1765. Willistown, Pa. 

Raplioe, Ireland. 



Of the father of these Baillies we only are told that he was a poor man 
in Ireland. 

Ale.\ander Baillie (XV 1) came to America abont 1716 and prospered. 
His name first appears on the list of taxables in 1725. He bought 100 acres 
of land in Willistown from Michael Jobson January 24, 1730. Having no 
family except his wife, he sent for his brother William, who was poor and 
blind. He came over not far from 1743, and lived with his daughter, Eliza- 
iDcth, at Alexander's house. At that time his daughter Ann was married, but 
Elizabeth was not, and William had given all his substance, which was con- 
siderable, to Ann. Alexander's wife, Margaret Feogan, died before him, leav- 
ing no children, and Alexander, by his will, left his property, two-thirds to 
William Bayley, and one-third (the wife's portion) to his kinsman and friend, 
Giles Feogan, perhaps her brother. 

There is no traditional knowledge of the emigration of the Baileys, except 
that the ship on which they came was overhauled by pirates who then infested 
every sea on which commerce was carried to such an extent that in the columns 
of the "American ^lercury," published weekly in Philadelphia in the middle of 
the eighteenth century, acts of piracy are constantly chronicled and excite no 
more comment as incidents of travel than do heavy gales of wind or any other 
disagreeable phenomenon. The pirates of those days were highway robbers and 
not ordinary nuirderers. That trait developed later when the severities used 
in punishing them caused reprisals; and when the Baileys' ship was taken, 
while they doubtless plundered the vessel of most of its valuables, the act which 
created the deej^est impression was their taking the vessel's supply of drinking 
water. For lack of this necessity of life the ship's company suffered gTeatly, 
some of the children dying for want of it, and their cries and her own sufferings, 
made such an impression on Elizabeth Bailey's mind that in her later life she 
said that she never took a drink of water without first thanking God for it. 
It is only related of her that she was slight of person and little of stature. 
The Baileys were Episcopalians and their place of worship was at St. Peter's 
church, two miles north of their home, where it is on record that Thomas 
Harris held pew ISTo. 16 in 1786. 



18 



THE HARRIS COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 



Edward Bayley, LL.D. (XV 3), the uncle who brought up Elizabeth 

Bailey, is called by her brother-in-law Bishop of Raphoe. He assisted his 

brother "William after he came to America also. Raphoe is a market town of 

Donegal, 15 miles S. S.W. of Londonderry. Its see was nnited with Derry in 

1835. He is recorded as being Rector of the parishes of Killmegan and Kilcow 

in the Diocese of Down, Ireland, in 1747, and as Treasurer of the Diocese in 

1755 and 1757, and he was the only clergyman of that name in that part of 

Ireland. 

GENERATION XVI. 



INDEX 
MO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BESIDENCE. 



The Children of Wilijam W. Baillie (XV 2) and 



XVI 

1 



Ann Bailey. 
Elizabetli Bailey. 



I. Richard McCaden. 
II. Henry McQuaid. 
Thomas Harris. 



about 1719. 
1726. 



I. 1736. 

II. Apr. 1.17iJS. 

1747. 



Aug. 22, 1700. 



Easttown. Pa. 
Willistown. Pa. 



The will of Richard McCaden, made Angnst 29, 1757, probated October 
1, 1757, appoints his wife, Ann, and Isaac Wayne executors. His name is 
on the assessor's list from 1749 to 1757, b\it not in 1747. 

Henry McQuaid and Agnes McCaden -were married in Christ church, 
Philadelphia. His name is on the assessor's list in Easttown in 1758, but not 
in 1774. In 1764 he owned 160 acres of land. 

For an account of Thomas Harris see Harris Record. 



GENERATION XVII. 

The Children of Richard McCaden (XVI 1) and .\nn Bailey. 



XVII 














1 


Elizabeth McCaden. 




about 17.S7. 








2 


Margaret McCaden. 




about 1738. 








3 


Mary McCaden. 




about 1739. 








4 


John McCaden. 




about 1741. 










The Children of Elizab 


eth Bailey (XVI 2) and Thomas Harris. 




5 


Mary Harris. 




Mar. 11. 1749. 




in infancy. 




6 


Bailey Harris. 




Mar. 10, 17.51. 




Apr. 4, 1757. 




7 


John Harris. 


Mary Bowen. 


Apr. 1, 17.53. 


1770. 


Dec. 25, 1838. 


Willistown, Pa. 


8 


Jane Harris. 


never married. 


Mav 27, 17,55. 




Mar. 0, 1778. [ 




9 


William Harris. 


Mary Campbell. 


Oct. 7, 1757. 


Apr. 24, 1780. 


Sept. 4, 1812. 


East Whitelaud. Pa. 


10 


Margaret Harris. 


David Christie. 


Jan. 10. 17(',0. 




Dec. 24, 1843. 


East Wbiteland, Pa. 


11 


Elizabeth Harris. 


Joseph Mackeldii£f. 


Feb. 0, 1702. 


May 9, 1786. 


June 2, 1840. 


Brandvwine Manor, 
Pn. 
Tredyffrin, Pa. 


12 


Agnes Harris. 


Israel Davis. 


Nov. 15, 1705. 


about ISOl. 


Aug. 15, 18.30. 


13 


Hannah Harris. 


George Calbraith. 

i 


Jan. 10, 1700. 


about 1707. 


Feb. 14, 1843. 


McVeytov.u, Pa. 



For an accoimt of the children of Elizabeth Bailey (XVI 2) and Thomas 
Harris, see Harris Record. 



THE BAILEY FAMTI.Y. 



NOTES. 



THE BAIT.ET FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE BAILEY FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE BAILET FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE HUBBABD FAMILY. 



19 



THE HUBBAED FAMILY. 

Lower, in his "J'amily Siinianies," derives this name from the Anglo- 
Saxon "hnghbert," "disposed to joy and gladness.'' It is frequently spelled 
"Hubbert" in the early records in this country. They seem to have been of 
Welsh origin. 

Thomas Hubbard (XV 1), who was the einigrant, settled in Tre- 
dyffrin township, within the limits of the Welsh tract. The township's 
name is derived from "Tre" or '"tref," "to\vn or township," and "Dyffrin," "the 
wide cultivated valley," and means "the township in the wide cultivated 
valley." It is sometimes called in the old deeds "Valley town." 



GENERATION XV. 



DBX 
JO. 

:v 
1 

2 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RBSIDBNCB. 


Thomas Hubbard. 
Mark Hubbert. 


Sidney. 
Alice. 


1674. 


about 1712. 


Feb. 26. 1764. 
Feb. 1739. 


Tredyffiin, 

Chester Co. 
Willistown, 

Chester Co 



Thomas Hubbert and Hark Hubbert, his br<jther, are among the 31 land 
o-wners of Tredyffrin in 1722. Thomas Hubbert is on a similar list of 21 land 
owners in 171.5. Thomas Hubbert and Stephen Hubbert and Thomas Hub- 
bard appear in the same way in 1753, but there is no one of the name on the 
list in 1774. 



Thomas Hubbard (XV 1) was an early settler of the Wesh tract. The 
first notice of his settlement is that he bought of William Cuerton 200 acres 
of land in the Great Valley, October 29, 1712; 100 acres of which he sold, 
March 20, 1713, to James Parry. He was a farmer and lived about a mile west 
of the Great Valley Presbyterian Church, on the farm which, in ISSO, was 
owned by Mordeeai Cornog. It is on the south side of the North Valley Hill, 
and is a fine place with good buildings. He was, in 1720, one of the chief 
promoters of the building of the Great Valley Presbyterian Church. 

His wife, born 1694, died in 179S, on 'the authority of Elizabeth Ann 
Eiehison (]\Irs. Lewis Shee), one of her great-great-granddaughters, who was 
a careful family historian. 

Mark Hubbert (XV 2) was taxed in Tredyffrin, 1718 to 1724, and in 
Willistown, 1725 to 1738. His will is dated December 1, 1738, and proved 



20 



THE HAEKIS COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 



February 27, 1739. To his brother Thomas he gave five shillings. His plan- 
tation of 160 acres he gave to his -wafe during her life and then to Elizabeth 
Humphrey, daughter of Benjamin Humphrey. No children are mentioned. 
Alice Hubbert, his widow, died in September, 17-41. 



GENERATION XVI. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



RESIDBNCB. 



The Children of Thomas Hubbard and Sidney. 



XVI 

1 
2 

3 

4 



Elizabeth Hubbard. 
Thomas Hubbard, 

Jr. 
Stephen Hubbard. 
Mary Hubbard. 



Methuselah Df.vis. 

Rachel Phipps. 
never married. 

I. John Campbell. 
II. Richard Richison. 



Nov. 10, 1713. 

about 171(5. 

about 171S. 

1720. 



May 24, 174C. 
about 175-5. 



I. 
II. 



174S. 
17.55. 



Apr. 

Jan. 
Feb. 
July 



1704. 

1761. 
1702. 
1S14. 



Tredyffrin, Pa. 

East Whiteland, 
Tredvffrin, Pa. 
East Whiteland, 



Pa 
Pa 



Elizabeth Hubbard (XVI 1). She devised by will March 27, 1794, to 
her granddaughter, Elizabeth Smith, then Elizabeth Wayne, the 35 acres of 
land she received from her brother, Stephen Hubbard, December 30, 1761. 

The will of her husband, Methuselah Davis, of Tredyffrin, "being about 
removing out of this province," is dated December 27, 1750, and proved 
October 2, 1752. He mentions a daughter, Sidney, and a child unborn; and 
in case of their deaths without issue the estate to be divided between the 
children of his sister, Anne Owen, and those of Thomas Harris, late of Robeson 
to^vnship, Lancaster county. 

Thomas Hubbard, Jr. (XVI 2), was, in 1748, one of the lieutenants of 
the Associated Regiments, who were pronounced "the finest body of militia in 
America." 

His will, written January 1, 1761, when he was "very sick," probated 
March 16, 1761, provides for his wife Rachel, and for the education of his 
children; devises "the land I now live on" (which was in Whiteland township 
and bordered on the Lancaster road) to his children; names his son Thomas, 
who was less than 20 years old, and his daughter Mary, who was not 18 years 
old, gives her £300 ; and names as his executors his brother, Stephen Hub- 
bert, and his friend, John Terapleton. They declined to act and letters were 
granted to his wife, Rachel Hubbard, March 28, 1761. Thomas Hubbard 
kept the White Horse tavern from 1756 till his death. When his widow married 
Owen Aston, they continued the business a few years and then removed to 
Chambersburg, Pa. Richard Richison was landlord there at a later date. 
Owen Aston was wagonmaster in 1759, in Gen. Boquet's expedition to Pitts- 
burg. 



I 



THE irUBBAED FAJriLY. 21 

There is still in existence an old "deed" dated Xovember 1, 1759, grant- 
ing to Thomas niibl)ard, of Whiteland, the right to hold a half yearly fair; 
in regard to which Gilbert Cope, the historian, says: "I never saw or heard 
of any similar document ; I would like to see it as an interesting item of local 
history." 

Stephen Hubbert (XVI 3) seems not to have married. By his will, dated 
December 30, 17G1, codicil January 31, 1762, probated March 1, 17ti2, he 
left the plantation on which he lived in Tredyffrin to his sister, Elizabeth 
Davis, and left her also 35 acres of land which he bought December 13, 
1752, of John Boggs. He leaves $7 per annum to his parents during their 
lives; to his relatives, John Campbell, £100 at 21 years of age, and Mary 
Campbell, £25 at 18 years of age; to his sister, Mary Richison, £20; to his 
brother's son, Thomas Hubbert, £100 at 21 years of age, and to the daughter of 
Thomas Hubbard, Jr., Mary Hubbert, £25 at 18 years of age. His sister, 
Elizabeth Davis, was his executrix, and he left a reversionary legacy to Sidney 
Davis, her daughter. In the settlement of his estate certain lands were allotted 
to .John and Mary Campbell. John, who later was leaving for the West, sold 
his share of the property to his sister, Mary Harris, January 10, 1780. My 
father, Stephen Harris, was named for this, his grand uncle, though he never 
used Hubbard as a middle name. 

]\Iary Hubbard (XVI 4) was married to Rev. John Campbell, in 1748. 
Her home during this marriage was in Xew Providence, Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania. After her husband's death, in 1753, she pi'obably returned to 
her father's house with her two children. 

Her second husltand, Richard Richison, was born in 1699, in Dublin, 
Ireland. He came to East Whiteland before 1731, married February 28, 1731, 
Ann Stockin, born Treviller, who was the widow of Captain Thomas Stockin, 
who died October, 1729. He was a son of Francis Stockin. He lived in 
Whiteland. Ann Richison died about 1752 and was buried in the aisle of St. 
Peter's Episcopal Chiirch in the Great Valley. There is no record of any 
children of Richard Richison's iirst wife. In 1755 he married Mary Camp- 
bell. His home was on the Swedesford or old provincial road to Lancaster 
on the eastward of, and adjoining the farm bought in 1770 by Thomas Harris. 
Richard Richison was one of five persons under whose care St. Peter's Protes- 
tant Ei3isco2)al Church was built in 1740, and he is buried there. 

He was one of the first vestry of that church, elected April 15, 1745, and 
one of the corporators under the charter granted April 15, 1786. He was a 
Justice of the Peace in 1749 and 1752. He was, in 1748, one of the Captains 
of the Associated Regiments. 

After his death, in September, 1790, his widow lived in the house across 
the Swedesford road from his home, at the northeast corner of the Lancaster 
road and Church lane; her son Samuel taking the homestead at the southeast 
2 



22 



THE HARRIS COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 



corner. During the rest of her life she lived in the dower house above named 
in the summer and with her daughter, Mrs. William Harris, in the winter. 
She became quite childish, but was gay and disposed to frolic, and her grandson 
(my father), Stephen Harris, had no playmate who pleased him so well as 
his grandmother. She was a great pedestrian and having walked the roads so 
often that she had no longer a choice which to take she would, in her later 
years, stand in the crossing of the roads near her house and walk in whichever 
way her staff would fall when she stood upright. 



GENERATION XVII. 



'iJof^ MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


C0N.S0BT. BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. DEATH. 


1 

BESIDBXCB. 


The Children of Elizabeth Hubbard (XVI 1) and Methuselah Davis. 


XVII 
1 
2 


Sidney Davis. 
Thomas Davis. 


Samuel Smith, 
never married. 


about 1748. 


about 1777. 


June 18, 1781. 
July 2, 1774. 


Tredyffrin, Pa. ' 




The 


Children of Thomas Hubbard, Jr. (XVI 2) and Rachel Piiipps. 




3 

4 


Thomas Hubbard. 
Mary Hubbard. 


William Cowan. 


about 1756. 
about 1758. 






Chambersburg, Pa. 
Western Penna., 
Youghiogheny 

River. 

1 




The Children of Mart Hubbard (XVI 4) and John Campbell. 




5 
6 


John Campbell. 
Marj' Campbell. 


never married. 17.50. 
William Harris. Feb. 27, 1752. 


Apr. 24, 1780. Nov. 26, 1837. 


East WLiteland, Pa. 




Th 


E Children of Mary Hubbard (XVI 4) and Richard Richison. 




7 
8 

9 
10 


Samuel Richison. 
William Richison. 

Mary Richison. 
Joseph Richison. 


Ruth. 

I. Mary Meredith. 
II. Elizabeth Thomas. 


1760. 
Jan. 14, 1762. 

Jan. 14, 1762. 
July 3, 1764. 


Auk. 30, 1823. 
I. 1782. iJIar, 3, 1837. 
II. May. 1800. 


East Whiteland, Pa. 



Sidney Davis (XVII 1). Her husband, Samuel Smith, was a son of 
John Smith, of Brandywine township, who died in 1794. Samuel owned and 
lived on a farm a quarter of a mile west of the Great Valley Presbyterian 
church in Tredyffrin township. The farm after his death passed into the hands 

of ifaxwell, and about 1840 it became the property of Edward 

Bartholomew. This was perhaps the farm sold in 1713 by Thomas Hubbard 



THE HUBBARD FAMILY. 



23 



to James Parry. It may have gone to Emma Parry, the sister of James Parry, 
thence to Margaret Vaughan, her daughter. 

Samuel Smith was a Revolutionary soldier and received several payments 
of money from the county in 1783 and 1784, on account of having been 
wounded. He died intestate and letters of administration were granted October 
18, 1784, to Elizabeth Davis (XVI 4), his mother-in-law, and John Smith, 
Samuel's father. 

Thomas Davis (XVII 2), by will November 17, 1773, devised to his 
sister, Sidney Davis, his sole heir-at-law, a tract of 33 acres 44 perches in 
Willistown townshiji, which came originally from Stephen Hubbard. 

_ Mary Hubbard (XVII 4). Her husband, William Cowan, writes to 
Major William Harris from Westmoreland, Pa., February 8, 1804, the post- 
mark being Greensburg, Pa. He speaks of Polly, his wife, having been in 
Chester county recently. He had not then bought a farm in Westmoreland 
and asks if his Chester county property has been sold. He lived then on the 
"Youghiogheny river near Frichman's mill." 

John Campbell (XVII 5) and Mary Campbell (XVII tJ). See Camp- 
bell Record. 

Samuel Riehison (XVII 7) took the homestead at Lancaster road and 
Church lane upon his father's death in 1790. His wife died there September 
20, 1808, having been born in 1757. Both husband and wife are buried at 
the Great Valley Presbyterian church. 

William Riehison (XVII 8). His first wife, Mary Meredith, died in 
1806. His second wife, Elizabeth Thomas, was born May 1, 1771, died 
February 25, 1855. She was a daughter of Benjamin Thomas, born 1729, 
died September 2, 1793, and Elizabeth Majer. 

William Riehison and both his wives were buried at St. Peter's Protestant 
Episcopal church. He inherited the northern part of his father's farm and 
lived half a mile north of the Lancaster road, in the house owned in 1850 by 
Harmon Bond, to whom the farm passed after William's death, when it was 
sold. 



GENERATION XVIII. 
The Children of Sidney Davis (XVII 1) and Samuel Smith. 



QEX 
0. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCB. 


Ill 

1 


Elizabeth Smith. 


Isaac Wayne. 


about 1778. 


Aug. 25, 1802. 


Apr. 17, 1852. 


Easttown Twp. 



24 THE IIAKEIS COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

Elizabeth Smith (XVITI 1). August 18, 1784, Elizabeth Smith 
(XVIII 1), minor, daughter of Samuel Smith, late of Tredyiirin, aged 
about 14, petitioned to have Benjamin Jacobs appointed her guardian, which 
was granted. On petition of her grandmother, Elizabeth Davis, September 
22, 1784, Joseph Walker was appointed her guardian, she being then said 
to be under 14 years of age. 

Elizabeth Smith's husband, Isaac Wayne, was the only son of General 
Anthony Wayne. For an accoimt of him, see Smith Kecord, page 57. 



THE HUBBARD FAMILY. 



NOTES, 



THE HUBBARD FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



TTIE HUBBARD FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE HUBBARD FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE FRAZEE FAMILY. 

GENERATION XIV. 



INDEX 
.NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARBIAQB. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


XIV 


Persifor Prazer. 


Margaret Carlton. 


about 1667. 


about 1700. 


about 1740. 


Tonyhamigin, 
Co. Monaglian, 

Ireland. 



The history of the Frazer family, so far as it is positively known, com- 
mences with Persifor Frazer (XIV 1). Who he was or what was his origin 
has been earnestly debated for a number of years. His great-great-grandson, 
Persifor Frazer (XVIII 1), devoted much time and thought to the study. 
His positive information amounts to this: 

Mrs. Henry Morris (Frazer XVII 8), said that John Watson, a Scotch 
soldier in her father's regiment, said in her hearing after the Revolution, that 
the original Persifor was of the Frasers of Fraserdale, and was a cousin of 
Simon Lord Lovat, the head of the Clan; and General Grant who captured 
Persifor Frazer (XVI 6), after the Battle of the Brandy wine, told Persifor 
that his own mother was a Frazer, and a cousin of John Frazer, Persifor's 
father. But no attempt was made till the time of Persifor Frazer (XVIII 1), 
to trace the direct relationship, and he had to admit that he could not prove 
it. Robert Frazer (XVII 2), says in his family Bible that the first Persifor 
was born in Scotland, that he went to Ireland with William III in 1690, and 
that he fought at the Battle of Boyne. A broadsword which he was said to 
have worn at that battle was in possession of the family till Robert's death, 
when it disappeared. He married, probably in Ireland about 1700, Margaret 
Carlton and spent the rest of his life there. W^hen Persifor is first seen he 
is living at Tonyhamigin, in County Monaghan, Ireland, across the lough from 
Glasslough toward Middletown. There are several spellings of this name 
(Tonyhamigin). This is the one found in the papers in which Alexander 
Smith of Clanickny, appoints John Frazer his attorney May 17, 1736. 

Glasslough is still a small town (population 179) twelve miles west- 
southwest from Armagh and six miles east-northeast from Monaghan. It is in 
the valley of the Blackwater River. Tonyhamigin belongs to the Leslie family 
from whom Persifor Frazer (XVIII 1) thinks that his ancestor leased it. 

Of his wife we know only the name and it is somewhat doubtful if her 
last name was Carlton or Clayton. The marriage took place about ten years 
after Persifor's emigTation to Ireland, and it is therefore probable that he 
married in Ireland. Persifor and his wife were both in feeble health in June, 
1737, and as she is not mentioned again it is probable that she died about 
the same time as her husband, about 1740. 

W^e know but little of Persifor Frazer's life. We have the direct evidence 

(25) 



20 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 



only of the letter of June, 1737, which was written near the end of his life. 
He seems then to have been a man in feeble health and in poor circumstances, 
distressed by misfortune, and with a disheartened outlook on life. He looked 
for a visit from his son John to whom he writes, and has some hope of retui-n- 
ing to America with him, which he probably did not do. Elizabeth Smith 
(Smith XVIII 02), who was a careful historian, quotes the family tradition 
that the Frazers were poor in Ireland. 

There remains no memory of him in Ireland, except that Persifor Frazer 
(XVIII 1) found in 1840 some descendants of Robert Smith the father of 
the wife of John Frazer (XV 5), who pointed out to him a small stream 
called "Persie's Brae," as a place where the elder Persifor was fond of stroll- 
ing. His farm was also called "Fraserdale." 



GENERATION XV. 



IMDIZ 
SO. 



MBIIBBB OF FAMILY. 



MAKRIAGB. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Pehsifob Fbazeb (XIV 1) and Maegabet Caelton. 



XV 














1 


Elizabeth Frazer. 


Alexander Smith 

(XIV-4). 


about 1701. 


about 1718. 


after 1766. 


Clanickny, 

Co. Monaghan, 

Ireland. 


2 
3 
4 
5 


Persifor Frazer. 
Rebecca B''razer. 
A daughter. 
John Frazer. 


never married, 
never married. 
Speer. 
Mary Smith. 


about 1703. 

about 1705. 

about 1707. 

Aug. 8, 1709. 


June 16, 1735. 


bet. 1737-1755. 
Sept. 7, 1765. 


Delaware Co., Pa. 
Newtown, 

Del Co., Pa 


6 


Margaret Frazer. 


John Geiger. 


about 1711. 


about 1729. 




Co. Monaghan, 

Ireland. 
Co. Monaghan, 

Ireland. 


7 


Sarali Frazer. 


John Price. 


about 1712. 


about 1735. 





Elizabeth Frazer (XV 1). Her husband, Alexander Smith, was a brother 
of Robert Smith whose daughter Mary married John Frazer (XV 5). Alex- 
ander died in 1700, and Elizabeth who seems to have been in good circum- 
stances remained where she had lived in County Monaghan. 

Persifor Frazer (XV 2) speaks in his letter to his brother John, written 
in 1737, as if he, Persifor, were the head of the family. He was evidently 
the eldest son. He must have died in the next few years, as no further men- 
tion is made of him in the family correspondence. 

Rebecca Frazer (XV 3), is spoken of as living in Ireland in 1737 — - 
apparently unmarried. The correspondence does not again allude to her. 

(XV 4). Of this daughter we only know that her married name 

was Speer, that she and her husband probably emigrated to America with her 
brother John, and that they were living there in 1737. 

John Frazer (XV 5). The Frazers were neighbors and on terms of 
affectionate intimacy with the family of Robert Smith in Ireland, into which 



THE FRAZEK FAMILY. 27 

John Frazer married, and the correspondence shows in the letters of Margaret 
H. Smith, written in 1737, and of Eobert Smith, written in 1755, that the 
affection continued to exist; but the tradition in the family is that the match 
between John Frazer and Mary Smith did not have the approval of the latter's 
parents. Their objection may have been founded on her delicate health, or on 
their reluctance to allow their eldest daughter to go on a perilous journey into 
a new country, for the marriage was made in view of the immediate departure 
of the bride and gToom to America, which took place on the 28th of June, 
1735, only twelve days after the wedding. Their voyage to America was of 
about the usual length, and they reached Philadelphia on the 28th of Sop- 
tendjcr. Their first home was at Newto^vn, Delaware county, Pennsylvania, 
to which place the family letters which were written from Ireland in 1737 
were directed. The addresses of the letters which Persifor — John's father, and 
Persifor his brother — ^vi-ote to John Frazer at that date are the same, and 
are noteworthy: "Newtown, New township." The township was laid out 
about 1685 under instructions to have a "townstead in or as near as conven- 
ient to the centre." The lots in this townstead or village were to be distributed 
to the purchasers of land in the township in proportion to the number of acres 
bought by each settler. "Newtown Square" still remains the most important 
settlement in the township, to testify to this early arrangement. There was a 
similar settlement, also called "Newtown" in Bucks county, where John Har- 
ris (Harris XVI 1), lived from 1754 till his death in 1773. 

In the settlement of Chester and Delaware counties, the hilly country was 
largely taken up by Welshmen, and this was the case with Newtown township, 
but what it was which attracted John Frazer there is not known, though it is 
probable that a friend of his of the name of Frazer allotted it to him as a 
residence. 

The English settlers, who were mostly Quakers, occupied the country 
to the southward, and there was no great love between them and the Presby- 
terians, to which faith the families of John Frazer and his wife adhered. 

Whether his early career in Pennsylvania was that of a merchant is not 
known, though it is not unlikely. In December, 1757, in a deed he describes 
himself as shopkeeper. He removed to Philadelphia, where his brother-in-law, 
William Crookshanks, addresses a letter to him in 1759. In the address of 
his letter he calls him "Marchand." He lived at one time on the north side 
of Arch street below Fourth street, and at another time on "Society Hill," at 
the mouth of Dock Creek. He was a shipping merchant, trading chiefly to the 
West Indies, and is said to have owned, or had an interest in, the vessels which 
carried his ventures. 

There was a John Frazer licensed to trade with the Indians about August, 
1748, and again September 4, 1753. As the name was not a common one, it 
is probable that the licenses were given to the person whose history is under 
consideration. 

He revisited Ireland at least twice after his emigration, once probably in 



28 TJIE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

the latter i)<art of 1737, and ouce uot far from 1752. He seems to have been 
a man of kindly nature. All of the letters written by various members of his 
family, and of his wife's family, speak of him in terms of affection, and they 
entrust to him the care of their interests in America. 

An unexecuted copy of John Frazer's will, dated Philadelphia, 1764, 
leaves to his son Persifor £5 (he having apparently already received his por- 
tion of his father's estate) ; to his son Robert £100, "but if Robert is now 
dead, or shall die liofore me, £100 is to be equally divided between .John's wife 
Mary, and his daughters Sarah and Ann." All of his children except these 
four bad died in infancy. He gives his wife one-third of his estate absolutely, 
the other two-thirds to be used so far as necessary for the maintenance and 
education of Sarah and Ann, and the residue to be theirs absolutely. His 
friend, Abraham Usher, merchant of Philadelphia, to be their guardian ; his 
wife and his son Persifor to be his executors. He and his wife both died 
in Philadelphia. 

There seem to have been other Frazcrs in America at the time of John 
Frazer's emigration. His father, Persifor Frazer, writing to John, June 2, 
1737, directs him to "give my love and best respects to Mr. Frazer and his 
family. I pray God reward him for his kindness to you, which I take as 
done to myself." 

In the accoimt of Persifor Frazer (XVI 6), of the administratiou of his 
father's estate, he acknowledges receipt of £4, 10s, from Hugh Frazer for a 
right to a seat in the Presbyterian Church at Philadelphia, which had been 
his father's, and he claims credit for £10 which he paid to Alexander Frazer 
for a coffin. Iliigh and Alexander are both names in the ruling family of the 
Frazers in Scotland, and Hugh may have been the Mr. Frazer to whom John 
was indebted for kindness on his first arrival. He may have been the treasurer 
of the Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia. 

There was property assessed in the name of John Frazer in j^ewtown 
townshi]) from 1737 to 1740. 

Of ilai-garet Frazer (XV 6), we know little, except that she married a 
man named (probably John) Geiger; that her husband was dead before June, 
1737, leaving children (1) Jack, who was then in Glasslough, Ireland, prob- 
ably with relatives, and (2) Mally or Margaret, who was with her grandfather, 
Persifor Frazer. There were two younger children whose names are not 
known, who had then lately died. The family was apparently broken up 
temporarily by a severe attack of smallpox, which prostrated Margaret, and 
from which she recovered slowly. She may have gone to America after this 
time, as we know that there were two sisters of John Frazer living in America 
in 1766, of whom 3Irs. Spcer was probably one, and Mrs. Geiger the other. 

Of Sarah Frazer (XV 7), we know only that she married John Pricb, 
and that she had a young daughter in 1737. Sarah Frazer was living in Penn- 
sylvania, September, 1768. 



THE FRAZER FAMILY. 
GENERATION XVI. 



29 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Eijz.\betii Frazer (XV 1) and Alexander Smith (XIV 4). 



XVI 














1 


Robert Smith. 




about 1719. 








•> 


Margaret H. Smith. 




about 1720. 








3 


Thomas Smith. 




about 1722. 








4 


Alice Smith. 












5 


Elizabeth Smith. 













The Children of John Frazer (XV 5) and Mart Smith (XV 1). 



6 


Persifor Frazer. 


Marv Worrall Taylor. 


Aug. 9, 173G. 


Oct. 2, 1766. 


Apr. 24, 


1792. 


Thornbury, 

Del. Co., Pa. 


1 


Robert Frazer. 




July 21. 1738. 




June, 


1763. 




S 


John Frazer. 




Oct. 9, 1740. 




Aus. 30, 


1741. 




'.) 


John Frazer. 




July 31, 1742. 




Sept. 7, 


1742. 




10 


Mary Frazer. 




Oct. 4, 1744. 




July 25, 


174(1. 




11 


Elizabeth Frazer. 




July 9. 1747. 




Oct. 9, 


1747. 




12 


Thomas Frazer. 




Sept. 23. 1748. 




Dec. 12, 


1749. 




13 


Sarah Frazer. 


I. Jacob Vernon. 
II. Samuel Hewes. 


Oct. 18, 1750. 


about 1772. 
about 1790. 


June 17, 


1825. 


Ashton Twp., 

Del. Co., Pa. 


14 


Marv Frazer. 




May 30, 17.53. 




Oct. S, 


17.54. 




15 


Anne Frazer. 


Joshua Vernon. 


Sept. 4. 1755. 


June, 1778. 


Aug. IS, 


1825. 





Of the members of the family of Elizabeth Frazer and Alexander Smith 
we have only an occasional glimpse, mostly in the letters of Margaret II. Smith 
(X\'I 2). Their lives were spent almost wholly in Ireland. 

The sketch which follows of the life of Persifor Frazer (XVI 6) is made 
partly of what materials I conld gather from members of his family whom I 
have interviewed in the last thirty-five years, but it depends mainly on, and is 
very largely derived from, the two volumes of records of the family which have 
recently been printed by my cou.siu, his great-grandson, Persifor Frazer, who 
has gone to great pains to gather information on the subject, and who has 
the original sources of information in his possession. I have his permission 
to use his books, which I have done to correct my previous information, and I 
shall frequently quote from them without further noting the fact. 

Persifor Frazer was bom in the night between the 9th and 10th of 
August, 173G, in the farm house in Xewtown toA\niship, Chester county. Pa., 
whicli his father acquired shortly after reaching Philadelphia from Ireland, 
on the 2Sth of September, 1735. It is quite possible that he was put in 
possession of this farm by the Mr. Frazer to whom his father so gratefully 
alludes in his letter to his son John Frazer, dated June 3, 1737. 



30 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

It is probable that bis motber was not strong enougb to take charge of a 
farm hoiise in the new country, and her husband i-emoved bis family to Phila- 
delphia shortly after the birth of his first child, and spent the rest of his life 
there engaged in mercantile pursuits. 

Persifor doubtless was educated in Philadelphia, though no record to that 
effect has been found. His writings show him to have been an intelligent man, 
and bis descendants who knew him state that be was carefully taught and 
trained. He had an acquaintance with the French language, which doubtless 
aided him in the mercantile intercourse with the French West Indies in bis 
early life, and he had in 1777 a small library of French books. 

At an early age be was engaged in mercantile business with his father, 
in which bis brother Robert was also interested. 

The first record we have of Persifor Frazer's business is in September, 
1758, when he gives Edward Physick, a merchant of Philadelphia, and the last 
Receiver General under the Penn proprietary intei'est, the father of Philip 
Syng Physick and Henry White Physick, a receipt for £1, Cs, 3d, for 1500 
needles, and in May, 1759, when be receipts to Physick for 17s, 6d, for 
1000 needles. We know nothing of the transaction, whether it was in con- 
nection with bis father's career in Philadelphia, or with his own in Chester 
county, but it w^as probably connected with bis father's business. 

He had, in his early life, but the date is unkno%\Ti, a store in the east 
end of the house owned by Richard Richison, who was the stepfather to my 
gi-andmother Mary Harris (born Campbell), at the intersection of the old 
Colonial road to Lancaster (called also the Swedesford road) wdth the road 
now known as Church Lane. His early mercantile education, bov.'ever, was 
probably wih his father, in whose business be seems to have been an active 
factor. Persifor Frazer was taxed in East Whiteland in 1754 and 1757. 

His connection with bis father and brother Robert in mercantile ventures 
to the Carolinas and the ^^'^est Indies were among his early undertakings ; but, 
on account of the death of bis brother and bis father, the wrecks of their 
vessels, and their unfortunate enterprises, the net result was not good. Persi- 
for evidently drew bis share of his father's property for some of his early 
ventures, as his father, though making his son Persifor an executor, leaves 
him but £5 in his will. 

He appears as interested in 1762 and 17C3 with his father, John Frazer, 
and his brother, Robert Frazer, in trading to the West Indies and the Southern 
Atlantic ports in regard to which some notes remain. They shipped beer to 
Charleston, South Carolina, in 1763. They made an adveiature to St. Kitts, 
West Indies, consigning flour to Samuel Osborne, at Barbados, West Indies, 
and receiving rum and molasses as a return cargo. 

After the loss of the brig "Ranger," with the death of Robert Frazer, in 
June, 1763, we have no further notes of any marine mercantile ventures and 
only a record in this connection of Persifor Frazer traveling overland to 
Charleston, South Carolina, in 1763 to settle their business and to collect the 



THE FEAZER FAMILY. 31 

insurances. His brother Kobi-rt died about June, 176.3, his mother iu .July, 
176-i, and his father in September, 17G5, so that the family was broken up, 
there being no one left at his father's death but himself, aged twenty-nine, 
his sister Sarah, aged fifteen, and his sister Anne, aged ten. John Frazer's 
estate was small. His executor, Persifor Frazer, accounts for it as being in 
all £823, lis, lid, from which £124, 16s, 9d, were deducted by him as 
''desperate debts" due from seventy-one persons, probably mostly accounts of 
purchases at his store, and he finds after paying some debts and making some 
allowances that only £308, 18s, 9|d remains to be distributed. 

His two daughters were to bo supported out of this fund. We have no 
note of their whereabouts, but they nuist have removed at some time subsequent 
to their father's death to Chester county, where we find that Sarah married 
about 1772 and Anne married about 1778. They and Persifor probably lived 
together for a time in Philadelphia, where Frazer's home reuuiined till about 
1766. October 19, 1767, in one of the papers regarding his closing out his 
interest in Deep Creek furnace and Nanticoke forge, he speaks of himself 
as "late of Philadelphia, merchant, but now of Ashton to-\vnship, Chester 
county." 

About the year 1762 Persifor Frazer became interested in the business 
of Jonathan Vaughan and Company, in Delaware. It had been known for 
some years that there were workable iron ores near Concord, in Delaware, but 
the development of iron works at that point was delayed because the boundary 
line between Delaware and Maryland had not yet been determined ; and the 
uncertainty of titles in the lower part of Sussex county, which was then 
claimed by both Delaware and Maryland, prevented capitalists from investing 
money in ore lands or in iron woi'ks. 

The boundary line was first run between the two provinces in 1763, and 
the Deep Creek Iron Works, located in Nanticoke hundred on Deep Creek, a 
tributary of the Nanticoke river, about three miles from the present town of 
Concord, were commenced about that time, perhaps in 1762. 

The company was composed of Jonathan Vaughan, who had originally 
Iseen of Uwchlan, Chester county, Pa., but who on becoming connected with 
the Deep Creek enteii:)rise removed to Worcester county, Maryland, and styles 
himself as iron master; William Doiiglass, of Dorset county, Maryland, iron 
master; Persifor Frazer, of Thornbury township, Pennsylvania, farmer; and 
David McMurtrie, merchant, of Philadelphia. These were their occTipations 
and their residences in 1770 when their connection with the Deep Creek enter- 
prise was being terminated, though Persifor Frazer was, in 1762, doubtless liv- 
ing in Philadelphia. It is likely that -John Frazer and David McMurtrie went 
into the enterprise, the former as a merchant, and the latter as a capitalist. 
They were friends before they made this venture, as Robert Frazer sent his 
regards to McMurtrie and his family in a letter to his brother Persifor, dated 
January 5, 1763. The money used in the company seems to have been largely 
McMurtrie's, while Frazer is active as the merchant. These parties applied 



3i^ THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTEY. 

to the aiitliorities of Pennsylvania, Avhicli then controlled the property, for 
5,000 acres of land containing timber suitable for making iron. This was 
granted and John Lnkens, Surveyor General, was directed to survey it. 

The company probably found that it was short of resources, and ]\Iay 18, 
1764, it was reorganized with the addition of some new members for the pur- 
pose of "enlarging, completing and finishing Deep Creek Furnace and Nanti- 
coke Forge." The latter enterprise was about three miles west of the furnace 
at a place known as Middleford, Maryland. 

Persifor Frazcr owned one-sixth interest in this enterprise and was the 
merchant. He seems to have had charge of the finances and of the company's 
store. The country was too young and capital too scarce to carry on the work 
successfully, and the partners in the company soon resolved to separate their 
-interests. ]\Iuch time and trouble were taken to agree on the terms of settle- 
ment, and an agreement was made in October, 1707, by which Persifor Frazer 
retired from Deep Creek ownership. There are many documents relating to 
this settlement among Persifor Frazer's papers, and he was not finally quit of 
his obligations for many years, tlie last note of his transactions with McMur- 
trie being in September, 1790 ; and one of the family traditions speaks of his 
contemplating a visit to Deep Creek at the time of his death in April, 1792. 

The iroii works themselves were largely developed, and continued to pro- 
duce the brand of "Old ^leadow" iron till the outbreak of the Revolutionary 
AVar, when, Chesapeake Bay being blockaded, the iron industry ceased. 

After the Revolution the grist and saw mills and the stores connected with 
the enterjirises w^ere kept in operation, but the iron business was not resumed. 
The estate was divided in 1802. 

After Persifor Frazer's connection with the Deep Creek operations closed 
he confined his interest to the Sarum Iron Works, Avhich had belonged to Dr. 
John Taylor, who was the grandfather of Frazer's wife, Mary Worrall Taylor. 
He died in 1756 and his son John Taylor, who was interested in his farms, and 
did not appear to care for the iron business, which was probably not very 
profitable, did not wish to take the management of Sarum. 

In the division of Dr. John Taylor's estate Sarum was put under the 
control for her life of his widow, Elizabeth Taylor, who leased it to the man- 
ager, her friend Daniel Calvert. 

Not having the means necessary to carry on the enterj^rise, Calvert sought 
the help of Jonathan Vaughan and Dr. Samuel Kennedy. Of Jonathan 
Vaughan some account is given in the sketch of the Yaughan family. Dr. 
Kennedy lived at what was afterward the "Steamboat Inn," on the Philadel- 
phia and Columbia tiirnpike, where my gTandfather, Joseph Smith, lived 
from 1824 to 1840. He was afterward the Surgeon of the Fourth Battalion 
of the Pennsylvania line, and was later the senior surgeon of a military 
hospital, and was tlie friend of Persifor Frazer. 

October 4, 1760, Vaughan and Kennedy made an agreement with Dennis 
Whelen, of Uwchlan. Vaiighan sold to Whelen his Lionville property Sep- 



THE FRAZER FAMILY. 33 

tembcr 21, 1761, to raise money apparently for the Sarum venture, and 
Vaiighan and Kennedy in the agreement of October, 1700, above named, bound 
themselves to purchase and manage Sarum Forge. 

Jonathan Vaughan contracted with George Pearce, of Thornbury, that 
Pearce should cut from his own plantation 400 coi'ds of wood, suitable for 
making charcoal, for 2s, 6d, per cord, to be delivered April 1, 1761. 

Just how Persifor Frazer became interested in Sarum does not clearly 
appear, but his mercantile education fitted him for the accounting and the 
mercantile part of the company's business, and it was probably the work that 
the handsome fellow did there that won the heart of Mary Worrall Taylor 
and led to their marriage October 2, 1760. 

As Frazer was the merchant of the Deep Creek enterprise it is probable 
that he had at first that position in regard to Sarum also, and we may fancy 
that his attachment to Mary Worrall Taylor, who had a good deal of property 
in lands, and who by the death of her father in 1761 became an orphan, led 
Frazer to close his connection with Deep Creek and become especially inter- 
ested in the management of Sarum. He made these changes of interest in 
the fall of 1767, and then took up his permanent residence at Thornbury, 
where his wife's farms were. At a later date he seems to have had the cutii-e 
management of the Sarum iron works. 

His marriage to Mary Worrall Taylor was objected to apparently by both 
families ; by the Frazers, as is shown in the letter of Samuel Osbonie, the 
Frazer correspondent at Bai'bados, West Indies, of Xovember 14, 1769, in 
which he asks him "if his wife is the lady of whom his father disapproved ;" 
and by Mary Taylor's family, probably because Frazer was a Presbyterian, 
there being at that time a strong feeling of disapproval among Friends of the 
marriage of their young people with the later comers of another faith, who 
were pushing their way so vigorously into a colony which Friends had founded, 
and which they hoped was to remain their special preserve, and the nursery of 
their faith. 

The records of their meetings about this time are full of cases of people, 
who, having married out of meeting came back and said they were sorry for 
having committed a breach of discipline. 

The religions objection may have been the cause of the opposition to the 
marriage on the part of the Frazer family also. Both Friends and Presby- 
terians having been bitterly persecuted for their faith in the British Isles were 
now enjoying full liberty to believe and practice what pleased them, and there 
are many evidences in the records of the time of bitterness of feeling between 
them. The preachers of both faiths had gi'eat influence with their congrega- 
tions in those days, and it was doubtless very much frowned on by them that 
their communicants should marry out of their own folds. It was held to Ix; a 
dangerous doctrine that any one should so far depart from the rigid rules laid 
down in their churches as to marry out of meeting to please themselves. It has 
taken several generations for each to learn to recognize the other as Christiana. 



34 THE SMITH COLLATERAL AXCESTKT. 

Persifor Frazer's wife was aftenvard much pressed to make an acknowl- 
edgment of her error in her marriage, but trhe would go no further than that 
"she was quite ready to say that she was very sorry to have wounded the 
feelings of Friends, but nobody should ever hear her say that she was sorry 
she had married Persifor Frazer." 

They were married in the ]\Iiddleto\\Ti Presbyterian Church by Rev. John 
Ewing, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia, of which 
church the family of John Frazer were members, as many of their descendants 
continued to be for a centxiry. Dr. John Ewing was Provost of the University 
of the State of Pennsylvania from 1780 to 1791, and Provost of the University 
of Pennsylvania from 1791 to 1S02, and was in 178-1 Chief of a Commission 
to extend Mason's and Dixon's line to the Ohio river. The marriage is noted 
on the records of the church in Philadelphia, but the family tradition that the 
ceremony took place at ]\riddletoAvn is doubtless correct, that church being 
within two miles of the bride's home. It is remembered that when the young 
couple appeared in the church the popular verdict pronounced them the hand- 
somest couple ever seen there. 

It is not easy to follow the changing ownerships of the iron properties in 
which Persifor Frazer was interested by means of the remaining notes of 
the various negotiations in regard to them. May 16, 1770, an agTcement 
was made to settle the ownership of Sarum forge between the parties who 
owned Deep Creek furnace, who were Jonathan Va\ighan, William Douglass, 
Persifor Frazer and David !MeiIurtrie. 

It does not appear how the others above named became interested in 
Sarum forge, nor do we understand how Calvert regained possession of the 
property, but on March 21, 1770, he rented to James Thomson and Persifor 
Frazer, who were brothers-in-law, having married sisters who were John Tay- 
lor's (XV 3) daughters, a two-thirds interest in the saAV-mill, grist mill, iron 
forge and other messuages and buildings devised to Calvert by Elizabeth 
Taylor. Thomson and Frazer were to keep the mill in repair and to pay as 
rent £23, 6s, 8d, annually. 

May 21, 1771, John Potts, of Whitemarsh township, Philadelphia, and 
James Thomson and Persifor Frazer having been vested in fee of the whole 
of this property (Potts holding eight-twelfths, Thomson five-twenty-fourths, 
and Frazer three-twenty-fourths), agreed to pay Daniel Calvert £76 rent 
annually and to put the works in order and operate them. The property to 
be managed in the interest of Elizabeth Taylor. This plan worked well for 
a time. August 16, 1776, Mrs. Frazer writes to her husband, then at Ticon- 
deroga, that Air. Potts has brought sheet-iron to gTeat perfection at his mill, 
that the old mill has been pulled down and made larger and in general the 
iron trade seemed prosperous. 

Persifor Frazer's business undertakings do not seem to have been profit- 
able thus far. The ventures of the family to the Carolinas and the West 
Indies turned OTit badly. Frazer became involved in debt in the Deep Creek 



THE FRAZER FA-MTT.Y. 35 

enterprises and appears for several years to liave been engaged in trying to get 
his indebtedness adjusted. 

Samuel Osborne, John Frazcr's old correspondent, writes to Persifor from 
Barbados, Xovembcr 1-i, 1769, asking him how he "met with these great losses," 
and John Pierce, May 6, 1771, reproaches him with "living in some measure 
upon the labors of others." 

He rescued himself from debt finally, but he seems to have had hard times 
in his early life. It was a period when ventures upon insufficient capital were 
usual and when it was hard to get an industry working permanently success- 
fiilly. It can only be said for Frazer that he was one of the many persons who 
in those days were working to the best of their ability to get the industries of 
the country established on a paying basis. 

John Taylor, son of Dr. John Taylor, died in 1701, and John Pierce 
was appointed to administer his estate August 14, 1762. He married his 
widow, who had been Sarah Worrall, about 176:5, and ajiparently went to live 
at her house. Persifor Frazer came to live with them after his marriage to 
Sarah Taylor's daughter, ilary Worrall Taylor, in October, 1766 (John Tay- 
lor's estate not having been yet divided), and continued thei-e imtil after the 
birth of his first child, who was born Jamiary, 1769. 

Contention arose upon some jioint and there are a number of angry letters 
on the p)art of John Pierce to Persifor Frazer and several accounts were pre- 
sented. The first account, in which Pierce maintains that Frazer is indebted to 
him, begins December 6, 1766, two months after Persifor's marriage. John 
Taylor's property was being divided and this apparently was partly the cause 
of the contention. 

February 11, 1768, Persifor Frazer buys of Joshua Bean, of Whiteland, 
a house and farm of 48 acres, 130 perches, in East Whiteland, at the inter- 
section of the old Colonial road with the road leading from the Steamboat Inn 
to the Rod Lion, where the White House store was kept till about 100 years 
later. The consideration named is £239, to be paid May 1, 1769. June 29, 
1769, Persifor Frazer contracts with Thomas Green, carpenter, to build him 
a frame barn 45 x 20 feet before July 10, and to build a dwelling house 21 
X 28 feet after harvest. 

December 9, 1709, seems to have been the tiuie at which Frazer removed 
his household, though it was apparently to some other house belonging to 
John Taylor's estate in Thornbury, perhaps the one that Thomas Green built, 
and not to the Whiteland house bought of Joshua Beau that he removed. 

The controversy with John Pierce was acute for a year or two. Mrs. 
Pierce left John Pierce's house probably in January, 1769, and lived thereafter 
till her death in 1780 largely with her daughter Mrs. Frazer, though Mrs. 
Frazer's daughter Sarah represents her as living with John Pierce at the time 
of the Battle of the l^randywine in September, 1777. She had left him again 
in Augiist, 1775, and seems to have had on the whole an unquiet time with him. 

John Pierce seems to have taken the tory side in the Revolution. June 



36 THE SMITH COLLATEKAL ANCESTEY. 

7, 1771), Thomas Cheyney, Esq., deputed Hugh Eeed, Jacob Vernon and Persi- 
for Frazer to call upon live persons, of whom John Pierce was one, "to see 
if they have not grain enough to spare to feed the poor." This course was 
taken with a number of persons whose loyalty was doubted during the Revolu- 
tionary War. 

When the trouble with Pierce subsided Persifor Frazer seems to have 
lived happily at home for several years. 

The storm blew over. Friends of those days \\ho would not fight, did not 
consider themselves debarred from the privilege of making themselves dis- 
agreeable and using harsh words, but Sarah Pierce continued to live at times 
with her daughter, and John Pierce contented himself as he best could, though 
occasionally growling as late as August, 1775. 

Other than this family jar, nothing seems to have marred the happiness of 
the Frazer home. Four children came to it before they celebrated the tenth 
anniversary of their wedding day, and Mrs. Frazer in after years, when the 
country's troubles took her husband so much away from home, looked back 
with fond regret to those early peaceful days. 

It can be fairly said for Persifor Frazer not only that he had a charm- 
ing and noble wife, but that he must himself have had much attractiveness to 
have won and kept such devoted love as she gave him. Such expressions of a 
warm and heartfelt though perfectly dignified and sane affection as constantly 
occur in her letters to him are rare in the formal correspondence of the days 
in which they lived, and throw a pleasing halo over their busy and earnest 
lives. 

In the years that immediately followed 1771 Persifor Frazer seems to 
have been mostly occupied with farming euterj^rises and with a certain unde- 
fined interest in the mills and the iron works that originally belonged to Dr. 
John Taylor's estate. We have, however, some records of other transactions 
of this time. 

John Reed, gentleman, makes a contract May 16, 1772, witli James 
Smither, engraver, both being of Philadeljihia, that Sraither shall engrave a map 
of the City and Liberties of Philadelphia from original suiwej's made by 
Thomas Holmes, Surveyor General of the province of Pennsylvania, and others, 
which map shall have the measurement 63 x 29 inches. Price to be paid to 
Smither £100 by January 25, 1773. This contract John Reed assigTicd Sep- 
tember 23, 1772, to Persifor Frazer. Accompanying this is a list of sub- 
scribers, 295 in all, who promise to pay to John Reed forty shillings upon deliv- 
ery of the work. Anthony Wayne, Persifor Frazer, Isaac Taylor and Caleb 
Parry are among the subscribers. I do not know that tliis map was ever pro- 
duced. Subscriptions to the amount of £590 should have been sufficient to 
ensure the publication, unless James Smither died before its completion. 

May 21, 1768, Persifor Carr, Sergeant in the 4St]i Regiment (of British 
troops), Avrites from New York, entreating Persifor Frazer to give him an 
account of his sister. He asks Frazer to advise her of Carr's good health. 



THE FRAZER FAJIILY. 



37 



This evideutlj is the Persifor Carr of whom the elder Persifor Frazer of Gen- 
eratiou XIV writes to his son, John Frazer, June 3, 1737, in which he calls 
Carr "a very bad boy." He was an acquaintance, possibly a relative of the 
family, but nothing more is known of him. 

Persifor Frazer, David McMurtrie and two others, who do not otherwise 
appear in this history, were interested in 1762 in acquiring lands on the 
Juniata river. Frazer seems to have retained some interests in the middle 
or western part of Pennsylvania throughout his life. Lands which were cheap, 
being unsettled, were a favorite subject of speculation in that period of the 
State's development. 

Persifor Frazer's connection with public affairs, which was to continue 
throughout his life, began before his marriage, for we find it of record that in 
January, 1765, shortly before the death of his father, before he got out of 
touch with aifairs in Philadelphia, he was appointed a delegate to a provincial 
convention, among whose acts was the adoption of a resolution recommending 
the passage of a law which should prohibit the importation of slaves into the 
provinces. 

When, after the French and Indian War of 1757-1763, England thought 
that her colonies should bear part of the burden which the war had imposed 
upon her, and for that purpose proposed to tax them, the merchants of Phila- 
delphia adopted a set of Non-Importation Kesolutions October 25, 1765. On 
the original co'pj of these resolutions, which was in Independence Hall in 1877, 
and probably is there still, Persifor Frazer's name appears as one of the sign- 
ing merchants. 

We have no further note of the part he took in the affairs of the province 
in the next eight years. Family tradition and official documents show him 
engaged in an extensive business at the iron \vorks of Sarum, while the farms 
owned by his wife and himself in Thornbury, where he lived, near Goshen 
meeting house, and at Do\vningtown, all in Chester county, must have engaged 
no small share of his time and thought. 

At Thornbury, during this time, much additional land was brought under 
cultivation, and tlie homestead, a substantial stone hoiise, which is still stand- 
ing, was built. He was doubtless ranked in those happy days as a fortunate 
and prosperous citizen. 

When, in 1774, the first Continental Congress, resenting the pressure which 
England was putting on the colonies in the matter of taxation, resolved that 
no more English goods should be imported, nor should any exportations be 
made to England after December, 1776, unless the obnoxious taxation laws 
should be repealed before that date, the Congress being without means to 
enforce its resolutions, popular meetings were held everywhere to ratify and 
carry into execution the recommendation they had made. 

The people of Chester county met at the Chester Court house December 
20, 1774, and named a committee of sixty-nine persons to act for the county 
in this matter. Of this committee Persifor Frazer was a member. This com- 



38 THE SMITH COLLATEEAL ANCESTET. 

mittee was authorized — "to be and contiune from this time until the month 
after the rising of the next Continental CongTess with full power to transact 
such business and enter into such associations as to thc-ni shall appear 
exfKi'dicnt." 

The committee advised that a Provisional Convention should be called to 
take into consideration — "the present unhappy situation of public affairs" — 
and such a convention assembled in Philadelphia January 23, 1775. In this 
convention Chester coimty was represented by ten members, of whom Persifor 
Frazer again was one. The convention took action looking to the prohibition 
of the importation of slaves into the pro^-ince, slavery being opposed in their 
view to the idea of a free Constitutional Government. The committee for 
Chester county met on March 20, and appointed a sub-committee of seven to 
draft a petition to the General Assembly with regard to the manumission of 
slaves. Of this sub-committee also Persifor Frazer was a member. 

The committee continued to meet frequently as the affairs of the country 
grew more disturbed. On the 22d of !May they unanimously recommended — 
"in order to avert the evils and calamities which threaten our devoted country 
that the following association be entered into by the good people of this county : 
We, the subscribers, do most solemnly resolve, promise and engage under the 
sacred ties of honor, virtue and love to our country that we will use our utmost 
endeavors to learn the military exercise and promote harmony and unanimity 
in our respective companies, that we will strictly adhere to the rules of decency 
during duty, that we will pay a due regard to our officers, that we will, when 
called upon, support, with our utmost abHities, the civil magistrate in the 
execution of the laws for the good of our country, and that we will, at all times, 
be in readiness to defend the lives, liberties and properties of ourselves and 
fellow-countrymen against all attempts to deprive us of them." 

The con^mittee, v>'hich became known as the "Committee of Safety," was 
reappointed by the Pennsylvania Assembly October 19, 1775. November 25, 
1775, the Assembly adopted rules to perfect the organization for the several 
counties, and December 2C the committee reorganized in conformity with the 
suggestions of the Legislature, and appointed eight persons, of whom Persifor 
Frazer was one, — "to represent the county if occasion be in Pro^^sional Con- 
vention during the ensuing year." 

The work which this committee did, and the course of events in Xew Eng- 
land where the oppression of the British Government was more decided and 
bore earlier fruit, proved to the Peunsylvanians who were interested in the 
welfare of their country that an armed struggle was near, and they began to 
prepare for it. 

The provincial authorities at this time were very active in pushing for- 
ward military organizations, as General Washington kept urging Congress to 
fill his army, then besieging Boston, with fresh men to take the place of such 
of his troops as were ncaring the end of the period for which they had enlisted. 

December 9, 1775, Congress directed that four battalions should be raised 



THE FRAZER FAMILY. 39 

in Pennsylvania, and December 15 asked the Committee of Safety to recom- 
mend proper persons as officers. January 5, 1776, the committee having pre- 
viously recommended as officers of the Fourth Battalion, Anthony Wayne as 
Colonel, Francis Johnston as Lieutenant-Colonel, and Nicholas Hausseger, of 
Lancaster county, as Major, proceeded to name eight captains for the several 
companies. Persifor Frazer was named first, and on the list of thirty-one cap- 
tains then appointed he stood eighth. He was assigned to the comuaand of 
the first C(impany of the Fourth Battalion, which had eighty-six ])rivates on 
the roll and numbered in all 104 persons. 

The battalion rendezvoused at Chester, Delaware county, on February 9, 
177G, and on February 17 Colonel Wayne rejiorted that he had in camp five 
hundred and sixty men and officers, and that the officers who were absent on 
recruiting service had secured sufficient recruits, as he believed, to make the 
battalion complete. Three companies of the Fourth Battalion had reported at 
Xew York under Major Hausseger on January 28. Colonel Wayne took com- 
mand April 26, and despatched Major Hausseger to Philadelphia to bring up the 
remaining companies, one of which was Captain Frazer's. They marched for 
ISTew York May 16, 1776, arriving in Xew York Saturday morning, May 18, 
and crossed over to Long Island — "f miles distant from New York" — Sunday 
morning, J\Lay 19. 

From that date till June 29 he was serving in or connnanding detach- 
ments which scoured the island to arrest tories, and preparing to resist the 
expected attack by the British troops. 

As a number of the soldiers were not fiilly armed, they were drafted off 
to reinforce the Northern Army, and took boat for Albany June 29, arriving 
there July 2. They left Albany for Lake George Thursday, July i, where 
they arrived on Sunday, Jiily 7, marching on foot sixty out of the seventy 
miles. They were encamped about Fort Ticonderoga, where they arrived July 
10, until December. 

During Persifor Frazer's stay about Ticonderoga he was appointed Major 
by General Gates September 4, 1776, Nicholas Hausseger, who had held that 
position, having been promoted to the Colonelcy of a German regiment. 

It was supposed at first that these troops were to be sent to reinforce 
Arnold in his attack on Quebec, but that movement having failed, they were 
not all sent beyond Ticonderoga. Colonel Wayne went north with part of his 
battalion before Frazer went north, but soon returned. The whole battalion 
met for the first time at Ticonderoga in July. Part of them had been in 
the liattle of Three Rivers. 

Dr. Kennedy was the surgeon with these troops, and the correspondence 
between Captain Frazer and his wife passed largely through his hands. j\Ir. 
David Jones was the chaplain. 

Frazer gives a very poor account of the New England troops, who lie 
says are largely composed of inefficient and unsuitable material, and ho 
expresses himself strongly in condemnation of them. 



40 TIIK SJIITir COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

He sjjeaks largely of the army's work at and about Ticonderoga. He 
says that that place was made quite strong by repairing the old defenses, that 
CroA\-n Point would have required too mueh work done to make it defensible, 
and that when it was attacked on the 13th of October the Americans withdrew 
to Ticonderoga. The British finding them strongly posted there did not attack 
Ticonderoga and withdrew from Cro\vn Point to Canada November 2. After 
they left the position at Ticonderoga it was put in order for the winter. 
General Gates, of whose condiTct Captain Frazer always speaks highly, re- 
turned to Philadelphia, and Colonel Wayne was left in command. He says 
that Wayne did the engineering work to put the old fort in good repair, and 
that his services were very highly thought of. Captain Prazer was sent home 
with despatches December i, 1771!. 

There are many letters of this time between Captain Frazer and his wife, 
though the irregularity of the mails and the delays in receiving correspondence 
seemed to him unaccountable. The letters from home are largely taken up 
with domestic details about the farm, the children and the neighbors, and with 
prayers for his safe keeping and his speedy return. There are a good many 
details as to the attitude of the community on the questions of the day, the 
Independence from Great Britain which had just been proclaimed, etc. Mrs. 
Frazer says, Augiist 27, 1770, "the people ai-e pretty well reconciled to Inde- 
pendence, but fear the heavy taxes that are to come, but, above all, they fear 
the New Englanders should the Americans gain the day." 

He was not without honor in his own country. His wife writes him in 
October, 1776 — "No person can Ix" in greater esteem than you are both with 
Whig and Tory. Your letters ai'e often called for to decide disputes." 

The American troops were partly withdrawn from Ticonderoga in the 
autumn and sent to assist Washington, who was withdrawing his force across 
the Jerseys to defend Philadelphia. The Fourth Battalion commenced to 
move in the spring of 1777, Greneral Wayne accompanying the troops. Frazer 
was assigned to recruiting service in Chester county. He was given $1,000 
for that service Februaiy 6, 1777, and July 2, 1777, he accounts to Michael 
Kemmel, Paymaster of the Fifth Battalion, for $3,067 which he had spent 
in the duty. 

He was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of the Fifth Battalion March 12, 
1777, Colonel Francis Johnston being in command. When the appointment 
was confirmed by Congress, then sitting at York, Pa., November 12, 1777, it 
was made to date from October 1, 1776. Colonel Johnston set out for the 
Jerseys from Chester in the beginning of April, 1777, leaving Lieutenant- 
Colonel Frazer in command at Chester. Frazer moved to Mount Pleasant, near 
Bound Brook, N. J., arriving there early in June. He found General Wayne 
there, and reports him in excellent health. At the end of June the American 
army advanced and the British retreated by New Brunswick to Staten Island. 
In the beginning of June our army was at Morristown, N. J., having moved 
there on the rumor that the British were going up the Hudson river to make 



THE FKAZEK FAMILY. 



41 



a junction with Burgoyno. They moved a little later to the Clove, fourteen 
miles from West Point, as the British army was evidently preparing for some 
movement, having gathered their forces in New York. At the next date of 
his writing the army had been withdrawn from this advanced position, and on 
July 29 they were at Howell's Ferry, on the Delaware river, above Trenton, 
having marched sixteen regiments 90 miles in four days, the British having 
taken ship and sailed southward. They moved slowly down southward, having 
heard August 22 that Howe's fleet had entered Chesapeake Bay, and on Sep- 
tember i the army was near Wilmington, Delaware. They were making them- 
selves ready for an engagement, and on August 29 they sent three wagons 
loaded with chests from their advanee<l position soiith of the Brandywine to 
Colonel Frazer's house for safety. 

The advanced parties of the British and American armies had now met, 
and after a few days' preliminary movements they fought the Battle of Brandy- 
wine. The Brandywine battle consisted of two separate engagements, the first 
near Chadd's Ford, on the Brandywine, where General Knyphausen defeated 
General Wa;vTie, and the second about Birmingham meeting house, where Lord 
Cornwallis defeated Generals Stirling and Sullivan. The first conflict in 
which Colonel Frazer was an actor was about five miles southwest of his home, 
and the seccjud was about five miles west of his house. The firing, which was 
heard by his daughter Sarah Frazer's school teacher, on the morning of Septem- 
ber 11, and by Mrs. Frazer herself, as nan-ated by her (see Taylor record), 
must have been that between Knyphausen, who was making a strong feint at 
Chadd's Ford to occupy the Americans and direct their attention from the 
movement of the main body of the army under Cornwallis, and the American 
troops under Wayne. He is reported in the family tradition as having the 
rank of Major in this battle, which is probably true, as his appointment as 
Lieutenant-Colonel was not confirmed till ]^ovember, 1777, and he seems to 
have been on special duty and not acting with his regiment. 

The American army, after the defeat, retreated on Chester, twelve miles 
distant, which they reached that night. The most considerable portion of Gen- 
eral Howe's army remained for five days at Dilworthtown, about two miles 
northeast of Chadd's Ford, his own headquarters remaining there. This was 
only about four miles from Colonel Frazer's house, and it is doubtless from 
this position that the body of British troops was detached which plundered 
Colonel Frazer's house on Saturday, September 13. For damages from 
ravages of the British troops under Captain do West's command on that date 
Frazer made afterward claims for £287 .5s. 

We can trace Colonel Frazer's movements for several days about this time 
by his wife's narrative of the plundering of their house, and by his own state- 
ments. She says that he stayed on the field of battle till evening, and then 
moved, probably with the rear guard, to the Seven Stars tavern, now the hamlet 
known as Village Green, about nine miles east of Chadd's Ford, and four miles 
northwest of Chester, to which point the American army had retreated. 



42 THE SJIITII COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

Late that night, having apparently been selected as familiar with the 
ground, to watch the movements of the enemy, he returned to his home, about 
five miles from Village Green. The next day a party of American riflemen, 
■who were also aj)parently on duty as a corps of observation, called at his house 
and advised him to keep away from his home, as the baggage of ten regiments 
was stored there, of which fact some of his Tory neighbors would probably 
inform the British, who would come to seize it, and might take him prisoner. 
He made light of the danger, and having been ordered to obsen^e the motions 
of the enemy, he started the next morning early to the Blue Ball tavern, on the 
Chester road, about half way between his house and Village Green, Major John 
Harper, innkeeper of Turk's Head, and his and Harper's brother-in-law, Jacob 
Vernon, joining him there. While absent on this duty his house was plundered, 
and the baggage of the officers of his division was taken, although the arms and 
ammunition which had been there, and which were the chief object of the 
British raid, had been removed some time before. 

In spite of the defeat of the American army at the Brandywine, General 
Washington thought it necessarv to risk another battle for the defence of Phila- 
delphia, then the chief city of the young republic, and ordinarily the seat of 
government. He had some hope of a favorable result, as he foimd the spirit 
of the army unimpaired by their late disaster. He, therefore, after retreating 
on Chester, moved around by Philadelphia and Germantown, and marcheil 
westward up the Lancaster road, reaching the White Horse tavern on the 15th 
of September, his army stretching along that road from the White Horse tavern 
about three-quarters of a mile west of my father's house, to a point near the 
Admiral Warren tavern, about two miles east of the Harris homestead. 

As soon as this movement became known to General Howe he moved that 
portion of his army under the command of Lord Cornwallis, which had been 
halted at Village Green for a few days, to the northward to become the right 
wing of his army, the remainder of the army, which had been posted at Dil- 
worthtowu moving also northward on j'arallel lines to form the left wing. 

Cornwallis' movement, which was commenced on the morning of Tuesday, 
September 16, caught Colonel Frazer, Major Harper and Jacob Vemon, who 
were again out on reconnoissance at the Blue Ball. Vernon, who was a civilian, 
escaped, but the two officers were made prisoners, and forced to fall in with 
the northward march of their captors. The two armies met that day on the 
high gi'ound just south of the siimmit of the South Valley hill, about a mile 
south of Frazer station on the Pennsylvania Railroad. A skirmish opened the 
battle, but had not proceeded far when a heavy rain came Tip and so wetted 
the insufficiently protected ammunition of the Americans that they withdrew 
to their original position near the White Horse tavern in East Whiteland town- 
ship, and the next day moved northward by way of Yellow Springs, crossing 
a few days later the Schiiylkill river about five miles above Phipnixville. It 
was the rain alone which prevented a general engagement which could hardly 
have failed to result in great disaster to the American cause. Our armv was 



THE FRAZEE FAMILY. 43 

inferior in numbers, in equipment, in discipline, and in morale, having just 
suffered defeat at IJrandywine, so that it was of great value to the liberties of 
America that the battle was not fairly joined. 

It is among the family traditions that just after the American army in 
retreat crossed the Schuylkill, the British who were in pursuit reached the 
ford, but the rains of several days had by that time so swollen the river tliat 
they could not cross it. The family, it is said, always spoke of this as a special 
interposition of Providence for the rescue of the American ai-my, as a battle 
in their then condition Avould have been certain dcstnTctiou. It was also said 
that General 'Washington took a similar view. 

While the tradition may have been correct concerning some detached body 
of troops, it is not true as to the main army, with which General Washington 
took no such risk, but crossed some twenty miles further np stream. 

The British army remained during the storm, which lasted several days, 
encamped on the Soutli Valley hill, a portion of them on fields which afterward 
belonged to the farm of Joseph Smith, my grandfather, who married Persif«n- 
Frazer's daughter Mary. The British had not found, since they had been in 
America, so rich a country as the one they were then in, and they plundered it 
without mercy. My great-grandfatlier, Thomas Harris, whose farm lay a mile 
or two to the northward, was one of the sufferers by these depredations, and, 
with other citizens, made claim in 1782 for rennmeration. 

The party who captured Frazer and Harper was the advance g-\iard of a 
considerable body of British troops, commanded by General Grant. The pris- 
oners were deprived of their horses and their swords, and were obliged to tramp 
along on foot. General Grant, riding near Colonel Frazer, entered into con- 
versation with him, and asked him his name. He replied — ''Persifor Frazer." 
"That is a Scotch name," said Grant, "and should not belong to a rebel." 
"England has called other men rebels who have resisted her Government 
besides those who resist it in America," retorted Frazer. "For that answer 
yon shall have your horse," said General Grant, whose family had taken the 
Pretender's part in the rising of 1745 in Scotland; and when the horse was 
brought, he restored Frazer's sword also. 

In the course of their conversation they discovered that they were cousins. 
General Grant's mother, whose name was Frazer, being a cousin of John 
Frazer (XV 5). This conversation took place as they wei-e passing the Goshen 
Friends' meeting hoiise on the Chester road, in East Goshen toAvnship, and 
just before they joined the main body of the British army. 

After his capture, his Colonel, Francis Jolmston, wrote to Mrs. Persifor 
Frazer : 

,iT\ T\r "Cross Roads, Xew Loxdox, Octol)er 1, 1777. 

"Dear Madam: — ' ' 

"I should have written to you soonei", but unfortunately fell sick innne- 
diately after the action at Chadd's Ford. 

"I am heartily sorry for your loss. I trust, however, that it will be of 
short duration, as I have great reason to believe a general exchange of prisoners 



44 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

will soon take place. The enemy will find your husband a man of honor and 
a gentleman; so that you have nothing to fear. He will be treated well. 

"If you have not already sent some hard cash and clothing to the Colonel, 
you Avill please let me know, that I may use my endeavors to procure some hard 
money, which, with his baggage, shall be sent with a flag of truce the earliest 
opportunity. I should be glad to know Avhether my papers, and some little 
clothing which I had in the Colonel's chest, be secure, and where they are. 

"I am, dear madam, yoiirs, etc., 

"Fr. Johnston." 

"N. B. When you write send yoTir letter to camp."' 

Thanks probably to General Grant's interest in him. Colonel Frazer says 
that while they remained under the guard of the Fourth and Sixty-fourth 
regiments he and Major Harper were well treated, but on the third day after 
their capture on the march of the troops from the White Horse, familiar 
gi-ound to Frazer, as it was here that he had kept store perhaps fifteen years 
before, they were turned over to the Provost Guard, and remained in their 
custody till they reached Germantowm, about a week after their capture. 

The Commander of the Provost Guard was Major Procter, whose brutality 
Colonel Frazer and many other Americans had frequent opportunities to experi- 
ence afterward. Frazer says in his statement of their experience — '"During 
the time of the march from the White Horse to Germanto^ra we were exposed 
to the insults of the army twice a day. In the morning the prisoners were 
drawn up near the road on which the troops were to march, and remained till 
all had passed, and then fell into the rear. In the evening we passed from 
the rear to the headquarters, near the front, at which times every kind of 
abusive language was made use of by the troops as we passed, without the least 
check from the officers. It had been frequently said by an oflicer of the first 
rank that when we came to the City we should be admitted to our parole. On 
our arrival there on the 30th of September I was informed by the Provost 
Marshal that we were to go to such qmirters as he chose, and remain there till 
further orders, our paroles having l>een previously signed at Germantown. 
Thus we remained till the 7th of October, when the Commissioner of Prisoners 
(one Dumont) informed us that he had orders to take us to the State House, 
where we were to be kept in close confinement. The reason given for this was 
that, there being so large a number of prisoners, it might be prejudicial to 
their interests to have us at liberty. Many of us were six days without hav- 
ing any provisions sent to us, and for many weeks after our allowance did not 
exceed from four to six ounces of salt pork and ab<:iut half a pound of ordinary 
biscuit per day. 

"Had it not been for the supplies sent by the citizens we must have per- 
ished. We remonstrated, but were told that we had the same allowance as 
their own troops when on board transports. We were told to purchase what 
we had need of in the City. Upon ]\[r. Ferguson being appointed Commis- 



THE FKAZER FAMILY. 45 

sary, oiir allowance was lioiipstlj dealt out for a considerable time, but by inat- 
tention it is now far short of what it should be. 

"At the first of our confinement our acquaintance were sufltered to visit 
us, but that and every other privilege was, under various pretexts, withheld 
from us except in some instances where particular officers of more humanity 
than the rest had the guard. 

"And it was not until they began to insult and restrain the prisoners that 
any attempted to escape. Sentries were placed in each of the rooms, who often 
picked our pockets and stole our clothes while we slept. Letters sent to lis 
were withheld, and often considerable sums of money. 

"The persons who brought our victuals were treated with abusive language 
and women with indecent behavior, and kept waiting at the outside door for a 
long time in bad weather. 

"This treatment, we have reason to suppose, was to prevent citizens from 
supplying the wants of the prisoners. 

"The soldiers also stole food and clothing they were entinisted with to 
deliver. 

"We were refused the liberty of going from one room to another. The 
windows were nailed down, though the smoke from a stove below stairs in the 
guard room, owing to the badness of the chimneys, has, for many days, been 
almost intolerable. 

"There were forty of us in the two upper rooms in the State House, which 
served for every purpose of kitchen and bedchamber. We were often insulted 
both by officers and soldiers. A negro, who was appointed to attend to our 
room, being ordered by Lieutenant Lefevre to sweep it, answered with very 
abusive language. Lefevre attempted to strike him, when the fellow swore he 
would run his bayonet through him. On Lefevre complaining to a subaltern 
officer of the Guard he was refused redress, and told that the negro was as good 
as he was. Application was made to the Captain of the Guard to as little 
purpose. 

"About the latter part of December we were informed that we were about 
to be removed to the new gaol (at Third and Arch streets). As we had been 
told by the physician who attended the prisoners that a very malignant fever 
raged among thom, and as we frequently saw six or eight bodies taken out to 
be buried in a day, we thought it our duty to complain to General Howe of 
this inhuman order. We were answered that the General intended by our 
removal to put us in a more comfortable sitiiation, and that we might be more 
agreeably accommodated, that he would order the physician to examine the 
state of the gaol and report thereon. 

"The doctor reported that no infectious disorder existed there, and con- 
seqtiently we were desired to hold ourselves in readiness for removal, with 
promises that the rooms allotted to us should be cleansed in the best manner, 
and everything made as agreeable to us as possible, which was neglected in 
almost every particular. One hundi-ed and eighty of the private soldiers were 



46 THE SMITH COLLATEEAL ANCESTItT. 

sick -nben we wore sent to this place, which, together with the causes, occasioned 
such a ." 

The narrative, which ends abruptly, was ])rol)alily written as justification 
for Colonel Frazer's escape from prison. Whether the statement was never 
finished, or whether this is an imperfect draft of it, is not known. He held 
and maintained successfully before a Court of Inquiry that the British admin- 
istration, in confining in a jail oflicers who should not have been subjected to 
such an indignity, and in depriving them of privileges to which they were 
entitled, had itself violated the terms of the pai'ole, and had thereby absolved 
the imprisoned ofiicers from its obligations. 

He had addressed a communication, relative to the sufferings of the pris- 
oners in Philadelphia, and to the subject of exchanges, to General Washington 
on the 9th of October, which, with some of the mouldy bread served to the 
soldiers, was carried by his wife to headquarters at White Marsh, eliciting a 
reply from "Washington on the 4th of November, in which he speaks of the 
efforts he is making to bring about exchanges on a proper basis, and deplores 
the distress of the prisoners. His gi-anddaughter, E. "W. Smith, says that 
during the winter of 1777-S, jail fever broke out among the American prisoners, 
and the prisoners were taken out of the jail and lodged in different parts of 
the City. Colonel Frazer, Major Harper and Colonel Hannum, who was a 
neighbor, and a friend of the other two, a civilian, a zealous whig, a relative 
of 'Squire Cheyney, who lived in West Bradford township, where the town of 
Marshallton now is, were lodged at the White Swan tavern, on Third street 
above Market street. Notwithstanding they had given their parole, the doors 
of their sitting-room and bedrooms were kept locked, their windows were barred, 
and a guard was placed over them. They considered that these restrictions 
were indefensible by military law, and felt themselves therefore released fi'om 
their parole, and at liberty to escape if they could. On St. Patrick's Day, 
March 17, 177S, when the Guard who were Irishmen got patriotically drunk, 
they escaped from their rooms, and clambering over a stone wall in the rear 
of the house went, some to the house of a Mr. Frazer, who was a distant rela- 
tive of Colonel Frazer, living in Front street near Pine street, and others to 
the house of Mr. Blackstone, who lived in the same neighborhood. 

Vigorous efforts were made to find the escaped prisoners ; all the avenues 
leading from the City were closely watched, and many of the houses searched. 
On one occasion when some of the party were hidden in a deep closet behind 
shelves, on which china was so arranged as to conceal them, the house was 
entered and the closet searched without discovering the fugitives. 

Their escape was aided by the indiscretion of some yoimg British officers, 
who, calling on a lady of their acquaintance immediately after the jail delivery, 
told them of it, which news they received with apparent surprise. The officers 
said that, while the prisoners had disappeared for the moment, they could not 
get out of the City, and ])roceeded to speak of the plans for their recapture. 



THE FRAZER FAMILY. 



47 



Being encouraged, they talked freely, and ai? the escaped ])rif;oners knew what 
traps were set for them, they took good care not to spring them. 

They remained in the City several days till the ardor of the chase had 
somcwliat abated, when 'Slv. Tilackstone procured a boat on which they crossed 
the Delaware, passing through the British fleet, and landed in Xcw Jersey, and 
in a short time rejoined the army. 

The British naturally thought that the officers had broken their parole, 
and General Howe demanded their return from General Washing-ton, but on 
investigation of the circtimstances, the Court of Incpury held that they were 
justified, and the demand was withdrawn. 

The prisoners, while doubtless suffering many inconveniences, some priva- 
tions and some annoyances, do not seem on the whole to have been badly 
treated. Mrs. Frazer having credentials from General Washington was 
allowed several times to see her husband, and Mrs. Gibbons, who was a sister 
to Colonel Hannum, and a neighbor of ilrs. Frazer, sometimes accompanied 
her. They were allowed sometimes to supply them and their friends with 
food and other necessaries, and though those, at times, failed to reach their 
proper destination, they did much to ameliorate their condition. 

After his escape he rejoined the American army and was at Valley Forge 
for a time, his name being signed Jime 4, 1778, as Lieutenant-Colonel, Fifth 
Pennsylvania Regiment, to an address from the officers to the Supreme Execu- 
tive Council on the want of clothing for their troops. He left Valley Forge 
June IGth, and joined the army in Xew Jersey. 

His command took part in the operations in New Jersey and Xew York 
in the summer of 177.'^, and he is said to have commanded his regiment at the 
battle of j\Ionmonth Court House, June 28, 1778, Colonel Johnston being 
absent from sickness, Avhich frequently disabled him. It is the family tradi- 
tion that during part of that action he was the brigade commander. Colonel 
Johnston was invalided for a considerable time after the battle. 

His wife, on the itth of September, 1778, addresses a letter to him in 
General Wayne's brigade at White Plains, X. Y., written in some distress, as 
she has had no news of him since the I7th of August, when he was ill, and the 
children since then have had the whoo]iing-cougli badly. 

Her next letter, written at several dates from Scptendjer 28 to October 
4, is written under still greater pressure. She has been bitterly disajipointed 
in her expectation of his return home. She has been very ill herself, and her 
son Persifor is still sick. 

There had been much dissatisfaction in the army on account of the action 
of Congress in promoting junior officers over the heads of those who had suf- 
fered imprisonment, who held that their sacrifices entitled them to continue to 
hold their relative rank. It was, perhajis, in recog-nition of this claim, that 
Congress had confirmed Colonel Frazer as Lieiitenant-Colonel of the Fifth 
Pennsylvania Begiment, but for some reason he was not wholly satisfied. He 
and his wife had many pecuniary sacrifices for the army, had sold a con- 



48 THE SMITH collateral ancestry. 

siderable part of their property to aid it, and his affairs had fallen into some 
disorder at home, the iron works were not running satisfactorily, and his wife, 
whose health had not recovered from the trials and exertions of the fall and 
winter of 1777, which were responsible for the loss of the child who was born 
in IMay, 1778, who died before it reached the age of two months, and whose 
brave spirit was temporarily broken so that she was a good deal dispirited, was 
greatly mourning his absence. At this time the appointment of his junior, 
AValter Stewart, to take precedence of him seems to have made his cup over- 
flow, and he resigned from the service on the 2d of October, probably about 
the time he received the letter from his wife which has just been quoted. He 
had presented in a manly way his complaints to the committee who were 
appointed to settle these matters of precedence at "White Plains, N. Y., Sep- 
tember, 1778, and says that he thinks he is injured by Walter Stewart being 
piit before him, though he had recognized the propriety of their advancing 
Colonels Richard and William Butler. His resignation was accepted by the 
Comnuuider-iu-C"hief October 9. 

His descendants must regret that he yielded to his chagrin and to the 
pleadings of his wife for his return home to her, but they must admit that 
their ancestors were the best judge of the circumstances, and must respect their 
decisions. A number of officers who felt that Congress was not acting to them 
in good faith, or in accordance with the promises made to them, left the service 
about this time. 

On the occasion of the acceptance of Colonel Frazer's resignation, October 
9, 1778, the following letter was addressed to him by his old commander, 
General Wayne : — 

"FRKDEEicKSBURci, October 13, 1778. 
"Dear Sir :— 

"It is with real concern that I part with a gentleman who has more than 
shared the dangers and fatigues of war with me ; but, as you must have 
maturely considered the matter previous to your resignation, I can only wish 
you a safe arrival, and a happy sight of your expecting friends. 

"At the same time I can't help expressing my regret at the loss of an 
officer, who, in every vicissitude of fortime and upon every occasion, has proved 
himself the friend of his country, the gentleman, and the soldier. 

"Adieu, my dear sir, and believe me, with every sentiment of esteem, 

"Yours most affectionately, 

"Lieutenant-Colonel Frazer." "Anthony Wayne." 

After his resignation from the army Colonel Frazer returned to bis farm 
at Tlionibury and took up again the work which had suffered from the absence 
of the master's hand for two years. 

He was appointed by Congress Clothier General July 15, 1779, biit 
declined it fi-om the inadequacy of the pay as comjiared ^vitll the necessary 
expenses, to say nothing about compensation. 



THE FKAZER FAMILY. 49 

Joseph Keed, who was then the President of the Supreme Executive 
Council of Pennsylvania, addresses him October 15, 1779, and says that 
General Washington has made a requisition on the State for 1500 men whom 
Reed is personally to command, and as he wishes to have the assistance of some 
gentleman of knowledge and experience as Adjutant General he offers the posi- 
tion to Persifor Frazer, pointing out that it will give himself very great pleasure 
and perhaps lay a foundation for some office of greater value and importance 
to the State for Persifor Frazer. This position he did not accept. 

April 1, 1780, he was appointed by the Supreme Executive Council Com- 
missioner of Purchases for Chester county. 

April 5, 1780, he was appointed by Quarter Master General Nathaniel 
Greene as his deputy, but on April 29, 1780, he declined to accept the apiX)int- 
ment, thinking the pay inadequate and the service unattractive. 

His name is borne on the roll of General James Sullivan's exfjedition 
against the Seneca Indians from January 8 till October 22, 1779, as Deputy 
Commissary General, though there is no family tradition, no letters and no 
records to show that he accompanied Sullivan in that enterprise. 

May 25, 1782, the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania appointed 
him Brigadier General of the militia of Pennsylvania, to rank second among 
the Brigadiers. 

This completes, I think, his military record. 

March 22, 1781, he was appointed County Treasurer, but was not re- 
appointed the next year, probably because he had then been elected to the 
Legislature. 

He was elected to represent Chester county in the Pennsylvania General 
Assembly October 15, 1781, and October 12, 1782, and again October 21, 1784. 
At this time, and until the adoption of a new constitution in 1790, the Legis- 
lature consisted of but one house. 

In an account which was made up June 1, 1784, the Comptroller General 
of the State of Pennsylvania admits that the State is indebted to Persifor 
Frazer, Lieutenant-Colonel, Fifth Regiment, in a smn which with interest 
amounted to £240, 5s., 8d., and March 15, 1786, the same authority reports 
that there is a balance due to him as Treasurer amounting with interest to 
£364, 16s., 5d. 

In September-October, 1786, he made a journey to Frankstown on the 
Little Jxmiata to take up lands so that the indebtedness of the State to him 
might be discharged, as the State had plenty of land but little money, and 
proposed to pay its creditors in imseatcd lands. 

Certain of the lands so taken up by Persifor Frazer were forfeited, as 
were so many of the lands located on Revolutionary warrants. His son and 
executor, Robert, allowed them to be sold for taxes, but parts of them were 
rescued by Jonathan Smith, who married Mary Anne Frazer, Persifor's daugh- 
ter, and thov went into the possession of .Tonathan Smith's daughter, Sarah 
Graves (Smith XVIII 52). 



50 THE SMITH COLLATERAL AJfCESTRY. 

The inrst assessment of land to Persifor Frazer on the i-ecord was in 
"Whiteland in 1754. This was probably the house afterward owned by Richard 
Richison, who lived at an earlier date at the White Horse store in East 
Whiteland. 

At a later time he was possessed of 49| acres of land in East Whiteland 
township in the northwest angle formed by the roads leading to Lancaster 
(the old Colonial road) and to Yellow Springs. This tract Robert Frazer 
(XVII 2), who was his father's executor, sold to Joseph Smith who had mar- 
ried Robert's sister Mary (XVII G). It came to Persifor Frazer in 1768 in 
settlement of an account with Joshua Bean. In was unlawfully seized by 
William Noblit in April, 1777, and held for two years, which seizure was 
the cause of much litigation. It was in the possession of Colonel Frazer at 
the time of his death. 

In 178[), upon the division of Chester county, Colonel Frazer's home in 
Thornbury township being left in Delaware cotinty, he removed to Westtown 
to a farm which he purchased there from Josiah Haines, that he might remain 
in Chester county, as he wished to continue to hold his offices of Justice and 
Register of Wills and Recorder of Deeds. 

Later, the family tradition states that he removed to Goshen township, 
near SugartoAvn, where his last years were spent. 

He followed a fashion of the time among military men — George Wash- 
ington being the most illustrious example — in that he became a member of 
the Society of Free Masons. There is among his papers a call to a meeting 
at NomstowTi February 9, 1789. 

Persifor Frazer was one of the twelve charter members to whom, 
December 6, 1790, the Grand Lodge granted a chai-ter to hold a lodge at the 
sign of the "White Horse, in East Whiteland, or at any place Avithin five miles 
of it." It was Lodge No. 50, the first lodge chartered in Chester county. 

January, 1783, he was on a committee of the Pennsylvania Asseniblv to 
meet President Dickinson of Pennsylvania, and was appointed January 21 
in the same year on a committee to make representation to Congress about 
certain seiztires of property. Persifor Frazer, John Hannum and Joseph 
Gardner reported to Congress that great abuses had been attempted in 
smuggling British goods from the ship "Amazon" under cover of a pass to 
bi-ing in clothing for British and German prisoners, and Congress resolved, 
January 24, to have the goods which had not been delivered to the prisoners 
examined. 

In 1785 Colonels John Bayard, Persifor Frazer and George Smith were 
appointed by the Supreme Executive Council, imder a resolution of the Gen- 
eral Assembly of April 8, 1785, Commissioners to Wyoming, where serious 
disturbances had been caused by the conflicting claims to jtirisdiction made 
by the States of Connecticut and Pennsylvania, each State claiming Wyoming 
as a jiart of its oaati territoiw. 

They left Philadelphia going by way of Bethlehem, and following prob- 



THE FBAZER FAMILY. 51 

ably what is now the Wilkes-Barre and Easton turnpike, which for many years 
was the principal avenue of approach to AVyoming Valley from the southward, 
avoiding the deep defile of the Lehigli and crossing the streams near their 
heads. 

They started on April 23, but were dclaj-ed by high water in the streams, 
and by awaiting the return of an expressman whom they had sent from 
StroudsbTirg into the enemy's countiy. Notwithstanding they waited till the 
waters had fallen. Colonel Frazer's horse stumbled at the crossing of the 
Lehigh, and threw him into the stream, from which he emerged with a wetting 
and the loss of his hat. They reached Wyoming May 3. They had a con- 
ference with Colonel Butler and Mr. Meade, who represented the Connecticut 
claimants; the answers of these gentlemen to questions propounded by the Com- 
missioners appear to have been peacealde and satisfactory, but it does not 
appear from Colonel Frazer's diary what jjrogress they made toward a 
settlement. 

After remaining there aboiit a week they returned down the Susquehanna 
river, reaching home May 13. They report to His Excellency the President 
of the Supremo Executive Coiincil, but the report is incomplete. 

Colonel Frazer was treasurer of the party, whose expenses amounted to 
£36 10s. besides £18 l7s. which Colonel Bayard spent, mostly for the pur- 
chase of a horse. They seem to have advanced tlie money themselves, and 
May 18, 1785, the Comptroller General having approved their accounts, an 
order was drawn on the Treasurer for £57 to reimburse them. 

April 8, 1736, the General Assembly elected Persifor Frazer Register of 
Wills and Recorder of Deeds for the Coimty of Chester, to which officer he 
was appointed September 4, 1790. He held these offices till his death, 
April 24, 1792. 

He was appointed by the Supreme Executive Council June IG, 1786, a 
Justice of the Court of Common Pleas for the term of seven ^yeai-s, which 
term he did not live to complete. 

He was also Prothonotary of Chester coimty, probably from 1786 till the 
division of the county in 1789, that office being frequently held by the same 
person as held the offices of Register and Recorder. 

ilarch, 1786, David Rittenhouse advises him that tliey have employed 
Mr. Wilcocks to make a considerable quantity of paper for public use, and 
asks him to oversee the workmen on such terms as may be agreeable to him. 
The mill at which this work was to be done was on Chester crock close to the 
Sarum forge. The Wilcoxes still own it. 

In 1787 he appears as the owner of several tracts of land, each containing 
about 400 acres, on the waters of Hannan's river in Washington comity. 
These, or some of them, were tlie lauds wliich his granddaughter, Sarali Smith 
(XVITI 52), lived on near Kittanning. 

Probably the last official pa^^er in the collection wliich remains is a draft 
of a communication which he addressed to some person in authority, probablv to 



52 THE SJIITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

Governor Mifflin, containing a number of suggestions as to changes desirable 
in the laws relating to the registering of wills and recording of deeds. 

It is of interest, as it refers to the bad state of his health, which for a 
considerable time had interfered with the discharge of the duties of his offices. 
It has no date nor address, and there is nothing to show that it was ever com- 
pleted and sent. 

Persifor Frazer had, in his eaidy life, been a man of gTcat endurance, 
though the record shows that he contracted ague while at Deep Creek 
funiace. After his Kevolutionary service, say from the age of forty years, 
he had, occasionally, attacks of sickness of whose nature there is no particular 
record. ISTo pennanent menace to his health was known to exist till May 13, 
1788, when his youngest child, Elizabeth (XVII 9), a baby of two years old, 
was drowned by falling into a well six feet deep, whose water flowed over the 
top. Her father was several miles from home when word of the accident was 
brought to him. The day was a hot one. He made great haste to return, and 
the exertion, his grief at her loss and self-reproach at not having better secured 
the well brought on a heart attack from which he never fully recovered. 

In April, 1792, he had occasion to go South — one account says to the 
Virginia Springs for his health, which, perhaps, is the correct account, though 
another account says to Deep Creek furnace on business. His baggage was 
packed for the journey, as he intended to start the next day, when Sally 
Mattson, a cousin of his wife, a "public friend," or Quaker preacher, visited 
the house for the purpose of dissuading him from the journey. She read to 
him the thirty-first chapter of the book of Isaiah, which begins — "Wo to them 
that go down to Egypt for help," and warned him that the journey would not 
be for his health, would be attended with great inconvenience and privation of 
many comforts, and that it was deeply imijressed on her mind that he should 
not go. 

He and his wife were accustomed to think highly of "Cousin Sally's" 
counsel, and of her spiritual discernment, and the journey was given up. 

Soon after Colonel Frazer went to Philadelphia to consult Dr. Duffield, 
who was a relative, and died there within a few days. Dr. Duffield had written 
him April 7, 1792, advising him in regard to his proposed journey to Virginia 
Springs, hoping that the journey would restore him to health. 

Whether his death had any ctt'ect on Sally ]\Iattson is not knovTi, but she 
soon after fell into a melancholy, and terminated her own life by cutting her 
throat. 

In Dunlap's American Advertiser, published in Philadelphia, appeared 
this notice of his career, which was written by Dr. Benjamin Rush: — 

"On Tuesday evening, the 24th instant, departed this life in this City, in 
the 56th year of his age. Colonel Persifor Frazer, late Register and Recorder 
of the County of Chester, and formerly a Colonel in the Continental army. 
Yesterday his corpse was removed to his late dwelling near West Chester for 
intennent. 



THE FRAZEK FAMILY. 53 

''This respectable citizen served his country as an officer in the Continental 
army with zeal and activity, and though an active and decided friend to the 
Eevolution in every stage of it, yet such was his candour and moderation that 
he acquired the general esteem and confidence of those who were not perhaps 
entirely of his ijolitical opinions. 

"Since the Eevolution he has been honored by several public appointments, 
all of which he discharged with such fidelity as will reflect honour on his 
memory. 

"By his death society is deprived of one of its most useful and ornamental 
members, and a respectable family have suffered an irreparable loss. 

"He was an elder in the Middletown Presbyterian Church of ]\Iiddletown 
for some years before his death. 

"He was tall, and, though slender, was very active, and had great endur- 
ance. He was of a genial and lovable disposition." 

Persifor Frazer's life is more fully told in the collection of papers which 
his great-grandson, Persifor Frazer, ptiblished in 1907. This sketch is in- 
serted here chiefly to make the Frazer history complete so far as is applicable 
to this publication. 

Eobert Frazer (XVI 7). We have a number of memorandums about his 
career which show his life to have been spent in commerce. Eneas McCarthy 
gives him a promissory note for £5 February 2, 1755, which Eobert endorses 
to his father. A letter to his father shows him, to have been in Kingston, 
Jamaica, July 21, 1758. He expects to sail thence in two weeks with a cargo 
of rum, sugar and molasses. His own venture ttirned out badly. It seems 
to have been of soap, which proved unremuucrative. William Crookshanks 
notes in a letter to his father, .John Frazer, that Eobert landed at Dublin, Ire- 
land, March 8, 1759, expecting soon to return to America. 

Samuel Osborne, who was the correspondent of the fimi in Barbados, 
writes to his brother, Persifor Frazer, from that point January 23, 1762. He 
congratulates his correspondent on his brother's safe arrival, and condoles with 
Eobert for his loss in trading. 

In the fall of 1762 the sloop "Eanger" loaded at Philadelphia. Austin 
Bartholomew and Eobert Frazer insured the vessel and cargo for £1200, ten 
persons or firms joining in the insurance for £100 or £200 each. 

The insurance was made jSTovember 12, 1762, at nine per cent., and agi-eed 
"to be of as much force and efl'ect as the surest writing ou a policy of assur- 
ance heretofore made in Lombard street or elsewhere in London." This seems 
to have been the form of marine insurance in Philadelphia before it was 
assumed by companies. Bartholomew and Frazer were probably supercargoes. 
Outerbridge was the master of the vessel. 

The "Eanger" sailed on November 12, 1762. Eobert Frazer reports to 
his father from Cape Ilenlopen on I^Tovember 16th, noting a pleasant voyage 
and pronouncing the "Eanger" a very speedy craft. 
4 



54 THE SJIITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

Janiiarv 5, 1763, he writes to Persifor Frazer from St. Eustatius, or St. 
Eiistatia, both forms of the word being used. St. Eustatius is the name at 
present. It is a small Danish island, 150 miles east-southeast of Porto Pico. 

They seem to have sold the ship and to have bought a brigantine or to 
have changed the description of the rigging. The name is still the "Panger." 
They had secured a cargo of salt and propose to sail from Charlestown, S. C, 
as soon as peace is certain. The Peace of Paris was signed in 1763, but the 
news of its signing had not yet reached the West Indies. 

Outerbridge had ceased to be master of the vessel and Kobert Frazer suc- 
ceeded him, Bartholomew becoming supercargo. They sailed January 17, 
1763, for Charlestown. The vessel was armed with eight or ten four-pounder 
gnms, and carried 1800 bushels of salt and thirty or forty cases of Geneva. 
They sailed in company with two sloops, one of them unarmed, the other a 
Letter of Marque, with thirteen or fourteen guns, Joseph Thompson Com- 
mander. 

Benjamin Davis, Austin and Thomas Bartholomew, and Pobert Frazer 
insure the boat and cargo for £800, February 21, 1763, in Philadelphia. It 
was also insured in Charlestown, and that insurance held, the Philadelphia 
insurance being surrendered. 

The vessel seems to have been lost, becaiise it was afterward paid for by 
the insurers, but Robert Frazer is heard of again. He must have returned 
from his voyage of January 17th, finding that no news of peace had been 
received and must have started again soon. Mr. Wilcocks, Jr., writing to 
Persifor Frazer from St. Christopher (now a British island, fifteen miles 
southeast of St. Eustatius), June 4, 1763, tells him that his brother sailed 
from there about Jlay 25th, was captured and carried into St. Martin's (now 
a French island, fifty miles north-northwest of St. Christopher), where he 
ransomed his vessel and cargo for £396. It was decided to sell the vessel at 
St. Eustatius. He left St. Christopher last May 28th. 

This is the last that we hear of Robert Frazer. His vessel was settled 
for in 1765 by the Charlestown insurers. Robert Frazer probably died in 
June, 1763, his vessel being lost in a storm. 

Sarah Frazer (XVI 13) lived within a short distance of her brother 
Persifor, half-way between Colonel Frazer's and Chadd's Ford, and it was to 
her house that Mrs. Persifor Frazer sent her children for safety when the 
British raided her house in September, 1777. Her husband, Jacob Vernon, 
was a son of Jacob Vernon, who married April 20, 1730, Elizabeth Cheney, 
widow of Thomas Cheney, whom she had married in 1726. Thomas Cheney 
was a son of John Cheney, of !Middletowu, who died in 1722. Elizabeth was 
a daughter of Benjamin Hickman and Ann Buflington, of AVestown. Thomas 
Cheney died in August, 1728. Jacob Vernon and Elizabeth Cheney had 
children — Abraham, Lydia, Elizabeth, Phebe, who married Major John 
Harper, and Jacob, Jr., who married Sarah Frazer. Joshua Vernon, who 



THE FRAZEE FAillLY. 55 

married Anne Frazer, was perhaps a cousin of Jacob Vernon. John Cheney, 
Jr., who was a brother of Thomas, married Xov. 3, 1730, Ann Hickman, a 
sister of Elizabeth Hickman. Their eldest son, Thomas Cheney, born 
December 12, 1731, died January 12, 1811. Jacob Vernon died in 1788, and 
Sarah Frazer married, about 1700, Samuel Hewes. 

In 1793 Samuel Hewes was granted a license to keep the "Seven Stars"' 
tavern, in Aston to\vnship, Delaware county, which license was renewed from 
time to time till his death, in 1821. His widow, Sarah, continued to keep 
the "Seven Stars" till 1824. 

The "Seven Stars" Avas located at Village Green, and was famous as the 
headquarters of Lord Cornwallis, the commander of the British forces which 
lay in that vicinity for some days after the battle of Brandywine. The tavern 
dates back to 17G2, and it Avas a well known house for a hundred years after 
that time. 

Samuel Hewes, who was born June 20, 17C2, was his wife's junior by 
several years. He died April 22, 1821. 

Anne Frazer (XVI 15) lived M-ith her brother Persifor, to whom she was 
devotedly attached, till her marriage. Persifor Frazer proposed that they 
should go to the East Whiteland property when she married in 1778, but 
ISToblet, who had seized the house, was unmovable, and they went to Dihvorths- 
town, a few miles west of Persifor's home, in September, 1778. 

The property on which Persifor Frazer proposed to settle his sister Anne 
after her marriage to Joshua Vernon was that which he came into possession 
of in 17CS in a deal with Joshua Bean. Frazer had a tenant in possession of 
the property, but he moved out April, 1777, and William Koblet took imme- 
diate jjossession. Frazer urged his wife to take measures to dispossess him, 
but his ejectment was postponed till Frazer should return from the army. It 
took some years to get rid of Xoblet. 

Some years later Joshua and Anne removed to Eedstone, Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, about thirty miles south of Pittsburg, and near the ]\Iouongahela 
river. Anne was, as her correspondence shows, a person of much sju-ightliness 
and warm alfections. Her husband, Joshua Vernon, died March, 1798. 

Phcbe Vernon, who was a sister of Jacob or Joshua, married John 
Harper, and this relationship doubtless promoted the companionship which we 
know to have existed between Persifor Frazer (XVI 6) and Major John Har- 
per, as he came to be known during the Revolution. 



56 



THE IIAKEIS COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 
GENERATION XVII. 



INDBS 
NO. 



MBMBER OF i'AMILY. 



BIETH. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Persifor Frazer (XVI 0) and Mary Wobeall T.aylor (XVI 1). 



SVII 

1 

2 

3 

4 
5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

10 


Sarah Frazer. 
Robert Frazer. 

Mary Anu Frazer. 

Persifor Frazer. 
Martha Frazer. 
Mary Frazer. 
John Frazer. 
Martha Frazer. 
Elizabeth Frazer. 
Elizabeth Frazer. 


neyer married. 
I. Mary Ball. 
II. Elizabeth Pries. 
III. Alice Yarnall. 
Jonathan Smith. 

neyer married. 

Joseph Smith. 

William Morris. 

Henry Myers. 


Jan. 
Aug. 

Feb. 

Feb. 
May 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Oct. 
May 
Dec. 


11, 1769. 
30, 1771. 

17, 1774. 

26, 1776. 

22, 1778. 
14, 1780. 

27, 1781. 
14, 1783. 
17. 1786. 
17, 1788. 


I. May 3,1798 
II. Oct. 1.5,1803 
III. Feb.ll.lSlS 
Oct. 16, 1794. 

Feb. 27, 1800. 
Oct. 15, 1818. 
Jan. 9, 1812. 


Mar. 3, 1841. 
Jan. 20. 1821. 

Feb. 19, 1845. 

Sept. 29, 1798. 
July 20, 1778. 
May 23, 1862. 
Aug. 3, 1783. 
Jan. 27, 1807. 
May 13, 1788. 
Apr. 25, 1857. 


Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

West Chester Pa. 
Bethel Twp., Pa. 
Upper Darby Twp., 




1 


'he Children of Sarah Frazer (XVI 13) and Jacob Vernon. 




11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
IS 


Abraham Vernon. 
Mary Vernon. 
Keujamiu X'tniion. 
Elizabeth Vernon. 
Persifor Vernon. 
Sarah Vernon. 
Anne Vernon. 
John ^'ernon. 


Edward Hewes. 
Sarah Harry. 
Josiah Richards. 
Rachel Cadwalader. 
Joel K. Ball. 
James Ball. 


Aug. 


28, 1778. 








The Children of Sarah Prazee (XVI 13) and Samuel Hewes. 


19 
20 


Samuel F. Hewes. 
Jemima Hewes 


Margaret McCullough. 
Isaac Massey. 


May 

Apr. 


16, 1795. 
16, 1707. 


May 6, 1819. 


Mar. 26, 1864. 





The Chiu)ren of Anne Frazer (XVI 15) and Jo.suua Vernon. 



21 
22 



Lydia Vernon. 
Anne Vernon. 



Job Vernon. 
Joshua Gibbons. 



1802. 



Sarah Frazer (XVII 1) had the family appreciation of humor, and many 
odd stories are told of her. She was lame, having dislocated her hip, thongh 
at what age is not knowai, probably after reaching maturity. She was plain 
spoken and somewhat eccentric. In her later years she was asked by a person 
who knew her slightly if she was not the mother of some person who was 
named. She replied with emphasis, and, ])erhaps, not without regi'ct — "I am 
not the mother of any living thing; I am nothing but a nasty old maid.'' 



THE PEAZER FAMILY. 



57 



She became, in middle life, a convert to the ilethodist faith, and identi- 
fied herself very thoroiighly with that body, which had at that time but little 
social position. She lived with her mother at Thornbury till about 1825, when 
her mother went to live at the house of her daughter (Mrs. Joseph Smith) in 
East Whitcland. She was an inmate for a short time of the family of her 
sister Martha (Mrs. William ilorris), but accepted a little later an invitation 
to make her home in Philadelphia with her sister Mary Ann (Mrs. Jonathan 
Smith). This was a Presbyterian household, and as interdenominational 
charity was quite undeveloped in those days, she found that she had rather 
live with those who were of the same household of faith with herself than with 
her kindred who held views not in sympathy with hers. She returned to West 
Chester, and took up her abode with an English family named Hodson, Avho 
lived on Gray street. She spent the rest of her life with them, and died at 
their house. 

Robert Frazer (XVII 2) was born in Middletown township. He received 
an unusually expensive education, entered the University of Pennsylvania in 
1786, and started to practice law in possession of a law library imported from' 
England at a cost of £100, being admitted at Chester to practice at the Chester 
County Bar July 30, 1792. He lived in Chester county till about 1807, when 
he removed to Philadelphia, where he remained till after the death of his 
second wife, who died in 1814, when he again removed to Chester county to 
a fann at the intersection of the road from West Chester to Philadelphia with 
the road ininning south from Paoli to Media and Chester, about wdiere the 
AVest Chester road crosses Crum creek, about ten miles from Chester, probably 
about where Edganont P. O. now is. It was here that he died. 

The family tradition says in regard to him, that he was the leading mem- 
ber of the Bar of Chester county, a most beautiful and winning speaker, but 
terrible in denunciation. He had a melodious voice. He was the idol of the 
place, and was held by his friends to be the equal of Sargent and Binney. 

He drew, in 1820, the petition to the Legislature for the removal of the 
county seat of Delaware county from Chester. He was Deputy Attorney-Gen- 
eral from May, 179.3, to February, 1800; from February to November, 1816, 
District Attorney of Delaware county; and a member of the Pennsylvania 
House of Assembly, 1795. 

His Philadelphia home, where his son John was born in 1812, and his 
son Persifor in 1809, was on the site of the Mariner and Merchant building 
at Chestnut and Third streets. 

His first wife, Mary Ball, was a daughter of Joseph and Sarah Ball, born 
April 23, 1778. She died without issue June 21, 1800. 

His second wife, Elizabeth Fries, daughter of John and Ann Fries, 
Quakers, of Arch street, Philadelphia, was born June 16, 1778, and died in 
childbirth, June 19, 1815. She was the mother of all of his children, except 
the youngest. 



58 THE SMITH COLLATERAL AXCESTEY. 

His third wife, Alice Yarnall, born August 28, 1778, died March 23, 
1830, was a daughter of Joseph and Sarah Pennell, Quakers of Chester county. 
Her gi-andfather was Joseph Pennell, born August 3, 1706. Her great-grand- 
parents were Joseph Pennell, of Edginont, Delaware county, born December 
12, 1674, and Alice Garrett, of Darby, and her great-great-gTandparents were 

Robert Pennell, of Middletown, and . She died and was buried at 

Middletown. 

Alice Pennell had married, first, Eli Yarnall, a son of Dr. Peter Yarnall, of 
Concord township, born 1754, died 1798. 

Mary Anne Frazer (XVII 3) has left no history that I know of, except 
that she was especially beloved by her namesake, my mothei". The record of 
her husband's life will be found in the Smith genealogy. 

Persifor Frazer (XVII 4). His father proposed that he should be a 
fuller, there beiug opportunities doubtless at some of the mills on Chester 
creek to learn that business. It was, however, distasteful to the son, who 
thought that he preferred a mercantile life. He made a voyage to Lisbon at 
the age of 17, the year after his father's death. The return voyage was a long 
one, 104 days from Lisbon to Philadelphia. They ran out of provisions, were 
forced to live on short allowance, and had to draw largely on the ship's store 
of figs, raisins and Lisbon wine. They had divided their last biscuit when 
they were relieved by a passing vessel. 

On their next voyage, which was to have ended in a French port, they 
were taken by an English vessel, and the whole ci'ew, except the captain, 
Frazer, who perhaps was supercargo, and tlie steward, were put in irons. 
They, however, overpowered the prize crew and regained possession of the 
vessel. They again shaped their course for their port, but ran into a fog. 
When it lifted they found themselves in the middle of an English fleet. They 
were recaj^tured, and Frazer was sent to Halifax, Xova Scotia. He was re- 
leased through the exertions of the American Consul, Phinehas Pond. This 
ended his seafaring life. He was appointed to a i^osition in the first United 
States bank, of which he became cashier. In the summer of 1798, the vellow 
fever raged in Philadelphia. The president of the bank died, and it was 
decided to remove the institution to Germantown. In making this removal 
in the hot humid weather of September, Frazer exerted himself greatly, with 
the result that he sickened and died of yellow fever after five days' illness, on 
the 29th of September, 1798, within a week after the bank's removal. Such 
was the confusion at the time, and so restricted was the intercourse, that he 
was dead and buried before his mother knew that he was sick, and it was 
\vith considerable difficulty that she discovered the place of his burial. 

Mary Frazer (XVII 6) was a woman of vigorous mind and body. Like 
her elder sister, Mary Anne (XVII 3), she was of the severe type of piety, 
common among Presbyterians at the beginning of the last century, and so was 



TilE FKAZER FAMILY. 59 

less popular among lier young relatives than if she had l)een more genial, but 
her children always spoke in warm praise of her, and she was doubtless an 
estimable wonuui. Her daughter, Ehoda, says that her mother and her aunt 
Martha (XVII 8) had very fine voices, and in their later life often sang for 
hours from an old music book in Mary's possession, ^Mary's voice being a sweet 
soprano, and Martha's a rich contralto. If Mary had a fine voice, she did not 
transmit it to any of her children, who were all deficient iu musical ability. 

For an account of her husband, see Smith i-ecord. 

She was a woman who had had claims to beauty iu early life. She was 
of medium height (say 5 feet 3 inches), and of rather spare figure, though 
not abnormally thin. 

Martha Frazer (XVII 8) married, at the age of thirty-five (later than 
■was usual in those days), William ^Morris, who was a small farmer living near 
West Chester. When her mother's estate was settled, she took her share of 
the inheritance and bought a farm in Bethel township, not far from Marcus 
Hook, where she lived till she was quite advanced in years, after which she 
made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Samuel Arthur. 

She followed the faith of her husband, who was a Methodist, and though 
she was in but moderate circumstances, she was of such smmy temper, and had 
so great a sense of the humorous, that she was an universal favorite in the 
family. Her husband, who was born in May, 1787, died about 1873. He 
was not a person of much culture, and it was the fashion among his wife's 
relatives to laugh at him, but he was an honest and upright, if not an enter- 
prising, man. 

Elizabeth Frazer (XVII 9) met an early death by drowning about sunset 
when two years old in a well six feet deep near her father's house, the water 
flowing over the edge of the well. Her father, who was at Sharpless' mill when 
he heard of the accident, hastened home, and the exertion of the walk, joined 
to his regi-et that his neglect to secure the top of the well should have caused 
the death of the baby to whom he was tenderly attached, brought on or aggrav- 
ated a heart trouble, from which he never wholly recovered. 

Elizabeth Frazer (XVII 10). It is not known why Colonel and ^Irs. 
Frazer should have been so attached to the name Elizabeth as to give the name 
to two of their children. Mrs. Frazer's gTandfather's second wife was named 
Elizabeth, as was her brother Isaac's wife, but neither of them were favorites 
in the family. It is probable, however, that it was the last-mentioned person 
for whom these children were named. The second Elizabeth was always called 
Eliza in the family. 

Henry Myers, whom Elizabeth married, was at that time a prosperous 
farmer of Concord township, Delaware county. He was of a family who were 
originally French Huguenots, living near the Swiss border. The original name 
was Mai, Maiere or Maiercs, which was changed to ]\[yers after the emigration 



60 THE SMITH COLLATERAL AXCESTKY. 

to America. The gi-andfather of Henry Myers was named Henri, an officer 
in the Swiss army. His oldest son, John, also a Swiss farmer, was captiu-ed 
and sent to Holland prior to 1770, but was afterward ransomed, and sent to 
America, settling in Chester connty. He married one of the Mcndeuhalls of 
that locality, and his eldest son, born January 1, 1789, was the Henry Myers 
who married Elizabeth Frazer. He was the prothonotary, recorder of deeds, 
register of wills and clerk of the Court of Delaware county from January 17, 
1824, to December 30, 1S32. In 182-t he was appointed one of the committee 
to receive General Lafayette. December 27, 1833, he was conmiissioned one 
of the Associate Judges of Delaware coimty, and while discharging the duties 
of that office was elected, in 1836, State vSenator for the district comprising 
Delaware, Cliester and Jjancaster counties, in which capacity he served for iowr 
years. Unfortunately, the temptations of Harrisburg were too gTeat for his 
strength, and his career was not a prosperous one thereafter. He lost the confi- 
dence of his fellow-citizens, who no longer elected him to office; he dissipated 
his property, and on February 23, 1855, he was frozen to death on the public 
road near Cobb's creek, where he was foimd the next day. 

The family home at that time was in Upper Darby township, Delaware 
county, a short distance west of Cobb's creek. It had been in Concord town- 
ship in their earlier life. 

Abraham Vernon (XVII 11) and ]\Iarv Vernon (XVIT 12) were twins. 
Edwai-d Hughes, born November 22, 1702, or Hewes — the name is spelled 
both ways — the husband of Mary Vernon, was the younger brother of Samuel 
Hewes, Mary's stepfather, her mother's second husband. j\Iary and her hus- 
band removed to Redstone, Pennsylvania. 

Sanmel Frazer Hewes (XVII 19) held the license for the "Seven Stars" 
tavern from 1824 to 1826. His wife, Margaret McCullough, was born April 
16, 1797, and died May 6, ISIO. 

The husband of Jemina Hewes (XVII 20), Isaac Masscy, born July 10, 
1795, died April G, 1825, was a son of Israel and Rachel Massey. In 1826, 
after her husband's death, she succeeded her brother, Samuel F. Hewes, as the 
proprietor of the "Seven Stars" hotel, in Aston township, Delaw'are county, 
and continued to hold a license for that hotel till 1834. 

I remember her only as a most extraordinarily ugly old woman, but she 
seemed to be much liked by my grandmother, her cousin, Marv Frazer 
(XVII 6). 

Anne Vernon (XVII 22). Her husband, Joshua Gibbous, born 1769, died 
1855, was a son of James Gibbons, 3d, born 1736, died 1823. who married, 
in 1756, Eleanor Peters. He was a great-great-grandson of John Gibbons and 
Margery, who were of Warminster, Wiltshii-e, England, and who emigrated to 
Bethel, Delaware county, in 1681. 







THE FBAZER FAMILY. 
GENERATION XVIII. 




61 


INPE.X 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


The Children of Robert Frazer (XVII 2) and Elizabeth Fries. 


SVIII 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 


John Pcisifor 

Frazer. 
Jacob Taylor Frazer. 
Anne Fries Frazer. 
Persifor Frazer. 
John Fries Frazer. 

Mai-y Worrall 

Frazer. 


John Rhea Barton, 
never married. 
Charlotte JefEers 

Cave. 


Dec. 20. 1804. 
Apr. 8, 1806. 
July 7, 1807. 
June 19, 1S09. 

July 8, 1812. 

Jan. 15, 1814. 


Dec. 28, 1825. 
Sept. 1, 1838. 


Mar. 14, 180.5. 
Apr. 10. 1S0(!. 
Nov. l.*?. 1837. 
Apr. 11, 1880. 

Oct. 32, 1872. 

June 11, 1814. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 




Tl 


IE Children of Robeb 


T Frazer (XVII 2) and Alice 


Tarnall. 





Joseph Pennell 

Frazer. 



Jane Biddle Wood. 



Dec. 29, 1818. 



May 26, 1846. May 4, 1878. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 





The 


Children of Mart Anne Frazer (XVII 3) and Jonathan Smith. 




8 


Margarettt. Smith. 




Aug. 14. 


179.5. 




Aug. 


14, 


1795. 




9 


Margaretta Smith. 


David Correy. 


Aug. 7, 


1796. 


Mar. 17, 1818. 


Mar. 


10, 


1878. 


Germantowu. Pa. 


10 


Persifor Frazer 

Smith. 


I. Frances Jeanette 




















Bureau. 


Nov. 16, 


179S. 


I. Jan. 19,1822. 


May 


17. 


1S58. 


New Orleans. La. 






II. Ann Monica 




















Armstrong. 






II. Apr. IS. 1854. 










11 


Mary Frazer Smith. 


Ehakim Littell. 


Oct. 2S, 


1800. 


Feb. 12, 1828. 


Jan. 


31. 


1873. 


Boston, Mass. 


12 


Beaton Smith. 


I. Mary Ann 




















Huddleson. 


Sept. 29, 


1802. 


I. Mar. 18,1820. 


Mav 


20, 


1861. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 






II. Theodosia Pettit. 






II. June 4,1839. 










13 


Robert Frazer Smith. 


never married. 


Nov. 1, 


1804. 




Feb. 


6. 


1826. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


14 


Marv Ann Smith. 




May 26. 


1807. 












15 


Sarah Smith. 


Levi M. Graves. 


July 18, 


1809. 


June 25. 1844. 


Aug. 


1, 


1808. 


Kittaning, Pa. 


16 


Anna Maria Smith. 


Samuel Robert 




















Slaymaker. 


Sept. 7, 


ISll. 


Jan. 9, 1833. 


June 


27, 


1877. 


Evanston, 111. 


17 


Harriet Romeyn 

Smith. 


James Musgrave 




















Aertsen. 


Sept. 1. 


1813. 


Nov. 3, 1S34. 


May 


7, 


1RS7. 


Germantown, Pa. 


18 


Howard Smith. 




Oct. 18, 


1815. 




Dec. 


25. 


1819. 




10 


Jane Correy Smith. 




Nov. 18, 


ISIS. 




Sept. 


11. 


1819. 









The Children of Mary Frazer (XVII 6) and Joseph Smith. 




24) 


Elizabeth Wright 














Smith. 


never married. 


Jan. 6, 1801. 




Dec. 27, 1885. 


Philadelphia. Pa. 


21 


Emma Vaughan 


Henry Augustus 












Smith. 


Riley. 


Dec. 3, 1802. 


Sept. 28. 1832. 


Feb. 17. 1S43. 


Montrose. Pa. 


'>•> 


Marianne Smith. 


Stephen Harris. 


Apr. 2, 1805. 


Apr. 4, 1833. 


Mar. 12, 1890. 


Germantown, Pa. 


23 


Persifor Frazer 


Thomasine Susan 












Smith. 


Fairlamb. 


Jan. 23. 1808. 


July 24, 1833. 


May 25, 18S2. 


West Chester, Pa. 


24 


Martha Smith. 


never married. 


Jan. 13, 1810. 




Nov. 4, 1872. 


New York, N. Y. 


25 


Vaughan Smith. 


Marj- Elizabeth 














Shepperd. 


Feb. 14, 1S12. 


Sept. 1, 1842. 


Nov. 21, 1901. 


Wilmington, Del. 


26 


Rhoda Wright 














Smith. 


never married. 


Aug. 22. 1«17. 




June 27. 1903. 


Germantown. Pa. 



62 



IMDKX 
NO. 



MKMBER OF FAMILY. 



THE SMITH COLL.\TERAL ANCESTRY. 
GENERATION XVIII. 



MASEIAGE. 



BESIDBNCB. 



TitE Children of Martha Frazer (XVII S) and William J.Iouris. 



XV 1 11 

27 
28 

29 



Mary Aiine Slorris. Samuel Arthur. Nov. 17, ISIO. 

Robert Frazer 

Morris, never married. June 10, 1S22. 

Joseph Roberts 

Morris. Arabella Darlington. Mar. 26, lS2.j. 



1S48. 



Mar. 1, 1S80. 
Mar. 22, 1845. 
Dec. 4, 1859. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
Media, Del Co., Pa. 



The Children of Elizabeth Frazer (XVII 10) and Henry Myers. 



30 

31 

32 



Persifor Frazer 

Myers. Eleanora de Sanno. 
Mary Anne Myers, j never married. 
William Henry j 

Myere. .Josi'phine Rinker. 



Oct. 25, 1812. 
Jan. 31, 1815. 

Dec. 29, 1821. 



1840. 

1851. iMar. 15, 1801. 



Apr. 27, 1802. 
Feb. 20, 1865. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Children of Samuel F. Hewes (XVII 19) and Maiig.vret McCui.lough. 



33 


Sarah Ann Hewes. 


Samuel Williams. 


Feb. 


4, 1820. 


Sept. 9, 1847. 


1861. 


Minersville, Pa. 


34 


James C. Hewes. 


Julia Y.Tlin. 


Jan. 


26, 1822. 


Oct. 12, 1847. 


Nov., 1SU8. 


Ft. Wayne, Ind. 


35 


Samuel Frazer 


Hannah Maria 














Hewes. 


Woodward. 


Nov. 


24, 1824. 


Dec. 25, 1855. 


Nov., 1903. 


Philadelphia, I'a. 


36 


Margaretta Hewes. 


never married. 


Mar. 


25, 1S27. 




1S73. 




37 


William Henry 
















Hewes. 


Eliza Hutchinson. 


l-'eb. 


11, 1829. 


Sept. 14, 1870. 






38 


Jemima Hewes. 




Dec. 


17, 1833. 




JIar. 4, 1840. 


Bridiioville. Del. 


39 


Robert McCullough 
















Hewes. 


Annie Howel. 


Oct. 


1, 1837. 




1840. 


Harrington, Del. 



40 
41 



The Children of Jemijia Hewes (XVII 20) and Isaac Massey. 



Sarah Hewes 

Massey.' June 19, 1821. 

Rachel Ann Massey. Reuben J. Halderman. July 28, 1S23. 



Aug. 13, 1828. 
1875. 



West Chester, Pa. 



42 



The Children of Ann Vernon (XVI 22) and Joshua Gibbons. 



Joshua Vernon 

Gibbons. 



Maria Louisa 



Oliphant. 



1803. 



1S41. 



1882. 



Fayette Co., Pa. 



THE FltAZEK FAMILY. 63 

Anne Fries Frazer (XVIII 3). Her husband, John Rhea Barton, was 
perhaps, the most distinguished surgeon of his day in Phihidelphia. x\fter 
the death of his first v>'ife he married Susan La Roche, born Susan Eidgeway, 
widow of Dr. La Eoche, and daughter of Jacob Eidgeway, a wealthy mer- 
chant of Philadelphia. 

Persifor Frazer (XVIII 4) was educated for the legal profession, but 
when he had finished his studies, traces of pulmonary weakness induced him 
to spend a considerable time abroad. After his return home he found that per- 
sons with whom he had commenced life had progressed so far that should he 
then begin the i>ractice of law he would no longer be in the same class with 
them, and as he had a competence, he decided that he would not embark in 
business. He spent much of his life abroad, though he considered it to be the 
dut}^ of a loyal American to be in his own country during the Civil War. But 
on the whole, he found a larger society of congenial people with interests 
similar to his own on the continent of Europe, so that he returned there from 
time to time, and he was in Eome, Italy, when he died from an attack of 
typhoid fever. 

He was a man of literary tastes, well read in history and belles lettres. 
He had kindly impulses, and a strong family affection, and he did many things 
to make easier the lot of those of his relatives who were less fortunate than 
himself. 

He gave a good deal of attention to the question of the Frazer ancestry, 
and his researches in France, Ireland and Scotland throw a srood deal of lieht 
on the question. 

John Fries Frazer (XVIII 5) was graduated from the University of Penn- 
sylvania with the highest honors in the class of 1830. He afterw-ard took com- 
plete courses of study in medicine and law, and was admitted to the Bar of 
Philadelphia in 1835. As he had a taste for scientific pursuits, he entered 
the service of the First Geological Survey of Pennsylvania, in which he was 
an assistant in 1836 under Henry D. Eogers, State Geologist. 

Upon the organization of the Central High School of Philadelphia by his 
life-long friend, Alexander Dallas Bache, as the capstone of the structure of 
public school education in Philadelphia, John Frazer was ap]iointed Professor 
of Natural Philosophy in that institution, wdiich position he held from October, 
1842, to April, 1844. 

In 1844 he was appointed to a similar position in the University of 
Pennsylvania and continued to discharge the duties of that position during the 
rest of his life. He received from the University of Lewisburg the degree of 
Ph.D. in 1854, that of LL.D. from Harvard" College, in 1857, was the 
Vice-Provost of the University of Pennsylvania from 1855 to 1868, a Vice- 
President of the American Philosophical Society from 1855 to 1858, a life 
member of the Academy of X'atural Sciences, one of the incorporators of the 



64 THE SJIITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

National Academy of Science, of which he continued a member throughout his 
life, and Editor of the Journal of the Franklin Institute from 1850 to 1867. 

He had, to an exceptional degi-ee, the family gift of wit and humor. He 
was the intimate associate of many of the leading scientific men of his day. 
He was very much respected and admired by those who came under his influ- 
ence as a teacher, and was one of the strongest men who have held a professorial 
chair in the University of Pennsylvania. 

He died suddenly of a heart attack at the University soon after its removal 
to its present position in West Philadelphia, the day after the faculty took 
possession of the new buildings. 

His wife, who was a daughter of Thomas and Sarah HoUinshead Cave, 
of Philadelphia, born September 12, 1815, died at Lennox, Massachusetts, 
August 19, 1881. Her father was a merchant of Philadelphia, and her mother 
was a daughter of Major John HoUinshead, of New Jersey, an officer of the 
line of the Continental Army in the Revolutionary AYar, and a member of the 
Society of the Cincinnati. 

Joseph PenucU Frazer (XVIII 7), was also educated as a lawyer, and 
was admitted to practice at the Bar of Delaware county, February 24, 1845. 
His inheritance was left in the hands of Henry Myers, husband of his aunt, 
Elizabeth Frazer (XVII 10), who failed to account for it satisfactorily, so 
that his fortune proved less than that of his half-brothers and half-sister. His 
name was changed at his father's death, and it was Robert Frazer after that 
time. He was Deputy Attorney General of Pennsylvania in 1845, being 
appointed in February of that year. He was the second President of the 
Camden and Atlantic Railroad, and was afterward President of the "Wilming- 
ton and Reading Railroad. He died of apoplexy. 

Plis wife was a daughter of Samuel and Fanny Collins Wood, born Feb- 
ary 14, 1820. She died AiTgiist 29, 1879. 

For sketches of XVIII S to XVIII 2G, see Smith Record. 

Mary Anne j\Iorris (XVIII 27). After the death in 1870, by consump- 
tion, of her husband, Samiiel Arthur, who for some years conducted a boys' 
school at Chester, in which service his wife was his able assistant, and who 
afterward was a clerk in the banking house of Jay Cooke and Company, Phila- 
delphia, she lived vv'ith her father in Philadelphia, and later, for some years, 
with her cousin, Mrs. William Darraeh, in Germantown. 

Robert Frazer Morris (XVIII 28), was a law student with his coiisin, 
Persifor Frazer Smith, in West Chester. Of somewhat delicate constitution, 
he had lowered his vitality by hard study and brought on a fatal sickness by 
over exertion in walking over to East Whiteland to summon my father, Dr. 
Stephen Harris, on the occasion of a serioiis illness of his cousin and pre- 
ceptor, Persifor Frazer Smith. One account says he died of bilious fever. 



THE FRAZER FAMILY. 65 

Joseph Eoberts ]\Iorris (XVIII 29), was also educated as a lawyer, and lie 
also studied under Persifor Frazer Smith. He was admitted to practice at 
the Bar of Delaware county, August 28, 1848. He acquired a large practice 
and prospered until on Sunday, December 4, 1859, while talking to a friend 
in Media, he suddenly dropped dead of heart failure. 

Persifor Frazer Myers (XVIII 30), was a commissary storekeeper at 
the Philadelphia United States Navy Yard. 

William Henry Myers (XVIII 32), was for many years agent of the 
Estate of George Pepper in Philadelphia. 

The husband of Sarah Ann Hewes (XVIII 33), Samuel Williams, was 
born July, 18 IG, and died March 15, 1864. 

The wife of James C. Hewes (XVIII 34), Julia Yahn, died December, 
1902. 

Samuel Frazer Hewes (XVIII 35) was a carpenter. His wife, Hannah 
Maria Woodward, died May, 1898. She was of Woodsville, X. J. 

The wife of William Henry Hewes (XVIII 37), Eliza Hutchinson, was 
horn December 2, 1845. 

Robert McCullough Hewes (XVIII 38) is a real estate agent. 

The husband of Eachel Ann Massey (XVIII 41), Reuben J. Haider- 
man, born June 16, 1818, was a Baptist clergyman. They lived in West 
Chester until the time of her death. 

Joshua Vernon Gibbons (XVIII 42). His wife, Maria Louisa Oliphant, 

born 1805, died 1884, was a daughter of Colonel John Oliphant and 

Woodbridge. The Oliphants were of Scotch origin. 



TTIE FRAZER FAMTT.Y. 



NOTES. 



TlfE FRAZER rA:MII.Y. 



NOTES. 



THE FRAZKI! FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE FRAZER FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE VAUGHAN FAMILY. 

Vaiiglian means "little of stature." Lower says, ''It is a family name of 
great antiquity. The Vaughans of Burlton Hall, Salop, descend from Tudor 
Trevor, tlie patriarch of many Welsh nobles and gentles ; the Vaughans of Pen- 
maen from Seissylt, lord of Mathavarn in the 14th century, through Jenkin 
Vychan, body squire to Henry VII, whose son adopted the name Vychan or 
Vaughan. The Vaughans of Court Field, Monmouth county, are of good 
antiquity, dating beyond the IGth century." 

This family of Vaughans were Welsh Baptists, and came to America as 
a land of I'cligious freedom. 

The family tradition says that the first Vaughan who came to this country 
took up a large tract of land in company with many of his countrymen who left 
Wales at the same time. This refers perhaps to the purchase of the Welsh tract. 
The Vaughans settled north of Downingtown in a hilly country, which they 
preferred to the more fertile Great Valley, because it was more like their own 
old home, because the valley was thought to be less healthy, and largely because 
they preferred the taste of the water of the hills, which came from the rocks 
underlying the limestone, to the limestone water of the valley, which created 
bowel disturbances. They called the settlement "L'wchlan"' or "Ywchlan," 
'"Upland" or "higher than the valley." 

The Vaughans do not appear as holders of property in the township in 
1715, but John is on the list for 1721. In 1728 David Lloyd, of Chester, who 
in 1718 had purchased at sheriff's sale a part of "Cox and Company's 30,000 
acres," sold 200 acres of his purchase to John Vaughan (XV 1). This tract, 
which includes what is now known as ''Lionville," and was then, or soon after, 
known as "Red Lion" tavern, passed to John's son, Jonathan, who with Ann, 
his wife, sold it to Dennis Whelen, September 21, 1761. This was probably a 
part of the transaction in which Jonathan Vaughan and Samuel Kennedy, of 
Whiteland, raised money to buy Sarum Forge in 1760. They then made an 
agreement with Dennis Whelen. 

GENERATION XV. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. CONSOHT. 


BIBTH. 


MAIililAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


XV 

1 


John Vaughan. 


I. 

II. Emma Parry 

(XV 14). 


June 5, 1G90. 


I. 
II. 1729. 


May 24. 17,50. 


UwcUlau Twp., 

Chester Co., Pa. 



John Vaughan (XV 1) was a man of education. His family Bible, which 
remains in the family, printed "Yn Llundain in 1677" in the Welsh language, 
contains a record of the birth of his five children. For his four boys he used 



67 



68 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 



the English language, but for his only daughter the records read — "Margaret 
Vaughan was born the first of November, 1735 Anno Christi, near three- 
quarters of an hour to the southing of the seven, stars — or Vel Septimo Stella — 
in the conjunction of the moon Vel Luna 1 to the planet Mars d, about 
eleven o'clock at night Vel ISTocte Milesimo Septingentesimo thricessimo Quinto 
N^ovembris die." 

"Johanis Vaughauuni His Liber Scriptsiaris probatum est." 
John Vaughan M'as allowed a license in 1740. This is the first notice of a 
tavern at Lionville. In his will, made December 30, 1749, probated May 30, 
1750, he mentions all of his family, but adds John to the number of his children, 
placing him first. He provided for the education of his three younger children. 
His wife long outlived him. For an account of her, see Parry Record. 

GENERATION XVI. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of John Vaughan (XV 1) and 



XVI 
I . John Vaughan. Ruth. 



about 1720. 



The Children of John Vaugh.\n (XV 1) and Emma P.\eby (XV 14). 



<> 


Joshua Vaughan. 




Sept. 1!X 1730. 












3 


Jonathan Vaughan. 


Ann. 


Aug. 7. 1732. 










Worcester Co., Md. 


4 


, Margaret Vaushau. 


Robert Smith. 


Nov. 1. 1735. 


Dec. 


20. 


1758. 


1S22. 


Uwchlan Twp. 


o 


, .Joseph Vaughan. 




June 3, 173S. 












6 


1 Isaac Vaughan. 




Oct. 23, 1743. 








died young. 





John Vaughan (XVI 1), who is mentioned first in his father's will, and 
who is to have an equal share in his estate, may have been a child of an early 
marriage, which seems likely, as the first John Vaughan was thirty-nine years 
old when he married Emma Parry. 

In 1748 he appears as one of the lieutenants in Captain George Taylor's 
company in one of the "Associated Regiments." In 1759 he appears as hav- 
ing furnished one wagon and ten barrels of flour to the supplies that were gath- 
ered for General Stanwix's ex])edition to rebuild Fort DuQuesue, which had 
been destroyed in 1758 by General Forbes when he abandoned it. My great- 
grandmother, Margaret Vaughan (XVI 4), often spoke of Colonel John 
\"aughan of the Revolutionary army, who migrated to Sottth Carolina, as a 
near relative of hers, which, if he were an elder half-brother, she might well do. 



Jonathan Vaughan (XVI 3) is said to have built the oldest end of the 
present Red Lion tavern; it is of l)rick. a rare building material in those days. 



THE VAUGHAN FAMILY. 69 

He sold the property in 1761 to Dennis Whelen, who laid out there the town 
of Welshpool, which did not succeed as a land speculation. Lionville is about 
four miles north of the Steamboat Inn, in the highland north of the Great 
Valley. Jonathan is taxed in Uwchlan in 1757 and 1758, but not later, his 
property interests being then transferred to Delaware and Maryland. This 
transaction probably furnished the money with which Jonathan Vaughan 
started work at Deep Creek furnace. He was an iron master, and was inter- 
ested in Deep Creek furnace, Worcester county, Maryland, and in Sarum 
forge, in regard to which the first notice we have is that in 1760 Jonathan 
Vaughan, Dennis Whelen, both of Uwchlan, Chester coimty, and Samuel Ken- 
nedy, of Whiteland, entered into agreements in relation to the working of 
Sarum Forge ; Dennis Whelen apparently being the capitalist of the partner- 
ship. Persifor Frazer seems to have been interested in these enterprises, and 
to have been originally the storekeeper and the cashier. Jonathan Vaughan 
and Persifor Frazer were also interested in the operation of iron works in 
Oxford township, Chester county, near the Maryland border. These interests 
continued till 1767, and probably to a later date. In the agreement about a 
settlement of the interests in Sarum Forge, May 16, 1770, Jonathan Vaughan 
is recorded as of Worcester Co., Md., ironmaster. 

Jonathan Vaughan calls himself of Uwchlan, Pa., in 1760. After begin- 
ning to take an interest in the Deep Creek enterprise he apparently removed to 
Maryland. 

There are very numerous notes in the Frazer correspondence in regard to 
Jonathan Vaughan. Vaughan and Company, who were Jonathan Vaughan, 
of Worcester Co., Md., ironmaster; William Douglass, of Worcester Co., Md., 
ironmaster; Persifor Frazer, of Thornbury township, Pa., fanner, and David 
McMurtrie, of Philadelphia, merchant, found deposits of iron ore at Deep 
Creek, Delaware, but the development of works there had to await the settle- 
ment of the Delaware-Maryland boundary, which was nm in 176.3. They 
applied about that time to Pennsylvania for a grant of 5,000 acres of land con- 
taining timber suitable for making iron. This was given them, and John Lukens, 
Surveyor General, was appointed to survey it. The building of the furnace must 
have commenced in 1762. As was frequently the case in the colonies, with a 
scarcity of money and little knowledge of the cost of new enterprises, the com- 
pany soon found itself short of money, and it was reorganized May 18, 1764, 
Daniel Wishart and Jemina Edwards, both of Philadelphia, becoming partners. 
The purpose of the reorganization was stated to be to enlarge, complete and 
finish Deep Creek furnace and Nanticoke forge, the former being on Deep 
Creek, a tributary of Nanticoke river, three miles from the present town of 
Concord, Del., and Nanticoke forge being three miles to the west of the furnace. 
These operations developed into a large business, and produced what was called 
"Old Meadow" ii-on imtil the breaking out of the Revolution, when the busi- 
ness ceased, Chesapeake Bay being blockaded by the British. After the Rev- 
olution the iron business was not resumed, but the grist and saw mills and the 
5 



70 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 



stores continued to do business. The estate was divided in 1802. In relation 
to Saruui forge, Jonathan Vaughan and Joim Chamberlain operated it in 
January, 1764. November 20, 1769, Jonathan Vaughan contracts with George 
Pearc<? that Pearce shall cut from his plantation 400 cords of good wood, suit- 
able for making charcoal, at 2s. 6d. per cord. 

There are many conferences and disputes about the settlement of the affairs 
of these iron industries for several years. The works were carried on witli 
considerable pecuniary difficulties up to the time of the Kevolution. 

Margaret Vaughan (XVI 4). After the death of her husband, Robert 
Smith, she lived part of the time on her own property in Uwchlan, and part 
of the time with her children, but mostly with General Matthew Stanley, who 
married Robert Smith's cousin, Sarah Cunningham. Matthew Stanley took 
care of her property, and was a very dear friend. 

In her later life Margaret Vaughan was spare and small of stature, a great 
reader of history, biography and theology, a cheerful person and a hearty 
laugher. Her wedding ring, which bears the inscription "As God decreed so 
we agi-eed," camo into my possession by demise from her great granddaughter, 
Esther Saffer, in October, 1907. 



INDEX 
NO. 



GENERATION XVII. 



MEMBER OP FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



BBSIDBNCE. 



The Children of John Vaughan (XVI 1) and Ruth. 



XVII 
1 



Joshua Vaughan. 



Jane Taggart. 



1749. 



Aug. 30, 1S08. 



The Children of Margaret Vaughan (XVI 4) and Robert Smith. 



2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



Emma Smith. 
Susanna Smith. 

John Smith. 
Sarah .Smith. 
Margarpt Smith. 
Jonathan Smith. 
Robert Smitli. 
Joseph Smith. 
Isaac Smitli. 
Isaac Smith. 
James Smith. 



Robert Porter. 
Nathan Grier. 

Elizabeth Bull, 
never married. 
Samuel Kennedy. 
Mary Ann Frazer. 
Esther Kennedy. 
Mary Frazer. 

Margaret Fleming. 



Nov. 17, 1759. ! about 1785. 
Dec. 25, 1760. I Nov. 13. 17S7. 



Apr, S, 


1762. 


IVc. 


28, 


1790 


Oct. 1, 


1763. 








June 24. 


1765. 








Aug. 2, 


1767. 


Oct. 


16, 


1794 


May 29. 


1769. 








Sept. 24, 


1770. 


Feb 


27, 


1.S0O 


Feb. 9. 


1772. 








July 20, 


1773. 


Apr. 


19, 


1R04 


Nov. 9, 


1777. 









Jan. 2, 1812. 



Apr. 2, 

Nov. 7, 

July 12, 

Nov. 20, 

Feb. 5, 

Dec. 18, 

Mar. 14, 

Oct. 8, 
Aug., 



1815. 
1785. 
1847. 
1839. 
1822. 
1845. 
1772. 
1840. 
1778. 



Finleyville, Pa. 
Brandywine Manor, 
Pa. 
Joanna, Berks Co. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
Frazer, Chester Co. 
Lancaster Co., Pa. 



THE VAUGHAN FAMILY. 



71 



Joshua Vaughan (XVII 1) was originally a blacksmith, living near the 
Red Lion tavern. He was a man of vigorous, independent mind, who read much 
and gained the regard and confidence of his fellow citizens. At a critical 
period of the Revolution he was deputy sheriff and keeper of the prison at 
Chester, where he performed his duty under trying circumstances with signal 
firmness and courage. The last note in regard to him in the Frazer corre- 
spondence speaks of him as a blacksmith, and notes the payment of an accoimt 
by him June 20, 1787. 

He was converted under the preaching of Philip Hughes, a Baptist 
preacher of Chester, and was baptized in 1780. On entering the water for his 
baptism the clergyman replied to some one who questioned him as to his com- 
panion — "we are Philip and the jailer." He was ordained December 1, 1809, 
and became a great and siiccessful preacher. He was courageous and self- 
possessed, and he carried into the ministry enough physical vigor to be a terror 
to the ruffians who at times proposed to interfere with his preaching. He was 
buried a half mile east of Chadsford on the Brandywine, where his farm lay. 

For notices of the children of Margaret Vaughan (XVI 4) and Robert 
Smith see Smith record. 

GENERATION XVIII. 



NDBX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDBNCa. 



The Childben of Joshua Vaughan (XVII 1) and Jane Tagqabt. 



VTTT 








1 


Isaac Vaughan. 






o 


John Vaughan. 


Elizabeth Lewis. 


June 25, 1775. 


3 


Jane Vaughan. 


John Curry. 




4 


Ruth Vaughan. 


David Johns. 





Mar., 1797. 



Mar. 25, 1807. 



Columbia. Pa. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



John Vaughan (XVIII 2) was a very able physician of Wilmington, 
Delaware. He was also a licensed Baptist preacher. He died at an early age 
of nervous fever. His wife was a daughter of Joel Lewis, Esq., of Christine, 
Delaware. 



THE VAUOHAX FAMTI.V. 



NOTES. 



THE VAUGHAN FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE VAUOHAN FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



TTIK V.vrnTIAN FAjriI.Y. 



NOTES. 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY 

GENERATION XII. 



INDSZ 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSOBT. 


BIBTH. 


MARBIAGX. 


DEATH. ' 


RESIDENCH. 


XII 

1 

2 
3 


Christopher Taylor. 
John Taylor. 
Thomas Taylor. 


Prances. 
Hannah Osbom. 
Prances. 


before 1620. 

about 1625. June 6, 1664. 
March, 1628. 


June 4, 1686. 
1686. 
1682. 


Tinioum Island, Pa. 
Mifldletown Twp., I'a. 
England. 



GENER.\TION XIII. 
The Chlldben of Chbistopuer Taylor (XII 1). 



Israel Taylor. 
Joseph Taylor. 
Mary Taylor. 



Phebe. 
John Busly. 



1690. 



1725. 



Bucks County, Pa. 



The Children of John Taylor (XII 2) and Hannah Osborn. 



Elizabeth Taylor. 
Jacob Taylor. 

Isaac Taylor. 



Hugh Durborow. 
never married. 

Martha Roman. 



1665, 
about 1673. 

about 1674. 



Mar. 11, 1686. 
Jan. 1695. 



June 1, 1722. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mar. 2, 1746. Thornbury Twp., 

May, 1728. Thornbury Twp., 



Pa. 
Pa. 



We meet, at the commencement of the histoiy of the Taylor family in 
America, some difficulty in determining the relationship of Christopher Taylor 
and John Taylor, of the Twelfth Generation. The surname Taylor was a 
very common one in south-western England, ranking next in frequency after 
those of Smith and Jones. This adds to the difficulty of identifying men 
bearing that name, but there are these reasons for thinking that these two men 
were near relatives, and, possibly, brothers. 

Dr. Smith in his history of Delaware county, which is a work of high 
authority, says that they were probably near relatives, biit does not give his 
reasons for thinking so. Christopher Taylor was a man of exceptional attain- 
ments — "one of the best scholars who arrived with the first settlers," says Dr. 
Smith. He had an important school in England. 

Jacob and Isaac Taylor were both, as the family tradition and the work 
they did unitedly testify, men of unusual scholastic attainments, and it is 
reasonable to suppose that Christopher Taylor had been their preceptor, as 
they probably had no opportunity for an education in England. Besides a 
knowledge of astronomy and its kindred science, astrology, which we know 
Jacob Taylor to have had, he possessed a literary faculty, and a knowledge of 



73 



74 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

books which was exceptional in Pennsylvania in his time, and i)(>th he and 
Isaac Taylor had more than an ordinary surveyor's knowledge, or they would 
not have been chosen to trace State boimdaries, which required astronomical 
determinations. 

Furthermore, Jacob Taylor adopted as his first choice of a profession, 
that of a teacher, and, like Christopher, his classical school was one of good 
repute. 

Isaac Taylor, like Christopher's oldest son, Israel, was a physician, and 
they may have been educated together under Christopher's giiidance, or, Israel 
may have acquired his medical knowledge at an English school, and Isaac may 
have been his pupil. 

It is also noteworthy that John Taylor who came to America holding 
an important commission from Penn's father-in-law, Thomas Callowliill, to 
locate a large tract of land in and about Philadelphia, part of which land was 
to have been his own, should go at once to Christopher's home on Tinicum 
Island, and settle there, as if the ties between them were so close that this was 
the nattiral thing to do. 

Isaac Taylor's grandson, John Taylor, named his oldest son Israel, which 
was the name of Christopher's oldest son. This was an unusual name among 
the early settlers of Pennsylvania, but if the older Israel Taylor was Isaac 
Taylor's near relative and his preceptor, there would be reason for the bestowal 
of the name. 

Christopher and John Taylor were nearly of the same age, and emigrated 
to Pennsylvania nearly at the same time. It is probable that Penn's friend- 
ship for Christojiher may have influenced Thomas Callowhill to appoint John 
as his agent in Pennsylvania ; and on the whole it seems that their fortunes 
were so closely linked that it is natural to suppose that they were brothers. 
On this supposition, Christopher Taylor is introduced into these papers, and his 
family line is followed a little way. 

Martha Gray Thomson (Taylor XVII 17), born 1777, who was a great- 
great-great-grandchild of John Taylor (XII 2), said that the Taylors were 
the county family in Wiltshire, but I know of no other testimony to their 
greatness. 

Christopher Taylor (XII 1) was probably born near Skipton in York- 
shire, England. Ilis profession was that of a schoolmaster, and he was suc- 
cessful in his calling, and had a classical school which was somewhat famous. 
He became a convert to the* faitli of the Puritans, and one of their preachers, 
but having taken one step away fi-om the form of faith of his fathers it was 
easier to take the next step, and under the teaching of George Fox he became 
a Quaker and in 1652 a preacher of tiiat doctrine. lie rose to eminence 
in that calling, traveled largely around England as an advocate of the tenets 
of the faith of the Quakers, and suffered persecution for his belief. He was 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 75 

imprisoned several times, once for a term of two years, and met with much 
cruel treatment in prison. These persecutions broke up his classical school 
several times, and caused him to remove it from place to place, his last location 
in England being at Edmonton, in Middlesex. 

Such men as Christopher Taylor, possessed of a good and well stored 
mind, of good judgiuent, and weaned by persecution from his native land, 
were welcome to William Penn, and he made emigration to his new colony 
attractive to them. Taylor purchased from Pemi 5000 acres of land, to be 
located in Penns,ylvania, May 22, 1682, and he probably came over with Penn 
on his first voyage in the ship "Welcome," Robert Greenaway, Commander, 
sailing from Deal, England, August 30, 1C82, and lauding at New Castle, 
Delaware, October 27, 1682, for we find him present at the first meeting of 
the Assembly of the new colony held at Chester, December 4, 1682. 

He left his school in England in the hands of George Keith, who was 
also an eminent Quaker preacher. Keith soon followed him to Pennsylvania, 
where his return to the faith of the Church of England, caused great dis- 
sension among his co-religionists, and troublous times in the colony. 

Christopher Taylor first settled in Bucks county, and represented that 
county in the first Assembly. Thomas Holmes' "Map of the Improved part 
of the Province of Pennsylvania," begun in 1681 shows several tracts of land 
in Bucks county belonging to Christopher Taylor, the principal ones being 
on Neshaminy creek, about eight miles above its mouth, and another lying on 
the Delaware river. 

William Penn showed Taylor many marks of his esteem, making him 
a member of the Provincial Council, in which body he sat from its first meeting 
at Chester, December 14, 1682, till the end of his life. He at once took a 
prominent part in its work, served on the most important committees, and it 
was probably the need of constant attendance there, that led him to remove 
from Bucks county in 1684, and take up his residence on Tinicum Island in the 
Delaware river, ten miles south of Philadelphia. 

Thig island had a somewhat interesting history. Being fertile and easily 
accessible, it was early considered a desirable residence, and it was the first 
point within the present limits of Pennsylvania at which a permanent settle- 
ment was made by Europeans. In its immediate vicinity the whole popula- 
tion of the Swedish colony was settled for some years, and upon the island 
their chief defensive work, Fort Cristinu, was located. A tablet has been 
erected near the Swedes church, Wilmington, to mark the site of Fort Cris- 
tina. The island was given by Queen Cristina, of Sweden, to Governor John 
Printz, the third Swedish Governor of the colony of New Sweden, November 
6, 1643. Governor Printz took command of the colony February 16, 1643, 
and lived on Tinicum Island, having named his residence there "Printzdorp," 
till the fall of 1653, when he returned to Sweden, leaving Lieutenant Pape- 
goya, who had married his daughter, Armegat Printz, to hold the command 
till the arrival of the new Governor, John Rysingh. 



76 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

Printz left the island in fee or in trust to his daughter Amiegat. Lieut. 
Papegoya, who had brought to Printz a letter of commendation from his 
sovereign in 1643, and had married Armegat in 1644, is supposed to have 
left the country about 1656, and to have returned to Sweden. His wife, who 
was a woman of strong character, resumed her maiden name, remained in Penn- 
sylvania, and figures frequently for some years in the public records. She sold 
Tinicum Island to Joost Delagrange, May 9, 1662, and returned to Sweden, 
but the failure of the purchaser to complete payment required her to come 
back and commence a litigation to recover possession. After many delays she 
succeeded, in 1675, only to see the property again slip from her hands in 
October, 1683, through the technicality that the son of the defendant had not 
been named in the suit, and his title, therefore, had not been extinguished. 
This brought the island into the possession of Arnoldus Delagrange, the son 
of Joost, who sold it February 2, 1685, to Christopher Taylor. He gave it 
the name "College Island," and is said to have had there a school in Avhich 
the higher branches of education were taught. 

With all the honors that came to him, he still, in 1685, styled himself 
''schoolmaster," considering, doubtless, that there was no more honorable occu- 
pation. Dr. Smith says: "He was well acquainted with Latin, Greek and 
Hebrew, and in 1679 published his Compendium Trium Linguarum of those 
languages. His literary qualifications were considerable, and he frequently 
exercised his pen in the cause of truth. He and his brother Thomas wrote 
much in England in the Friends' cause." 

Christopher Taylor was constantly in request for public duties duriug the 
short term he had to live after his emigration. June 6, 1683, the Proprietor 
appointed him one of the Commissioners to the Government of East Jersey to 
remonstrate against certain misrepresentations which had been made by that 
colony to England, and which were bringing Perm's colony into discredit, and 
June 11, 1683, he names Taylor first in a similar Commission to treat on a 
similar subject with the Governor and Council of West Jersey. 

Upon his removal to Chester county he was appointed President Judge 
of the county court, which position he retained till his death in 1686, and 
March 17, 1686, he was by jiarticular commission constituted one of the 
Justices of the Peace — or Judges, for the ofhce then had that dignity — for the 
town and county of Philadelphia. He was also for some time and until his 
death Register General of the Province. 

He died in June, 1686, the office of Register General being put into other 
hands July 5, 1686. It is possible that his pleasant home on TiniciTm Island 
may have been responsible for his short life there, as settlers in the new land 
had not then learned by experience what deadly fevers lurked in such beautiful 
spots. At a later time Tinicum Island was reported as being so unhealthy 
"that farmers were compelled to get their work done before September, by 
which time ague and remittent fever left nobody able to work." 



THE TAYI.OK FAMILY. 77 

John Taylor (XII 2) is stated in his letter of instructions from Thomas 
Callowhill to have been of Alderton, in Wiltshire, England, though the usually 
accurate family tradition reports him to have been of Staffordshire. He is 
supposed to have been a surveyor, as Callowhill, who was the father of William 
Penu's second wife, in a letter of instructions to him, gives him directions 
about locating and mapping a tract or tracts of land, amounting to iifty-five 
hundred acres, which he has bought from Peun. He may have paid an earlier 
visit to America, for the family tradition says that he came over before Penn 
did, and it is recorded that in July, 1679, the Court of Whorekills county, now 
Sussex county, Delaware, orders that "A Magistrate of the city of ]^ew York 
having unadvisedly taken an oath of one Taylor concerning fees which he 
claimed for surveying at Whorekill (Cape Henlopen), the Magistrates of that 
city having nothing to do in any other part of the Government of these pre- 
cincts, and the said oath being taken contrary to law, you are to take no cog- 
nizance of it and by no means admit it as proof of evidence for Taylor." 

The Taylors who were surveyors in those parts at that period must have 
been few in niunber, and it is probable that John Taylor was the surveyor 
referred to. It is also noticeable that Callowhill gives him no instriictions 
about his work in the neighborhood of Philadelphia, such as would naturally 
be given to a stranger to the country, from which it may be inferred that the 
locality was not new to him. 

He was, however, doubtless in England in July, 168-t. Callowhill's letter 
speaks of him as a basket maker, which occupation may have been his ordinary 
business, as surveying in England would not probably occupy his time fully. 

Callowhill's instructions, dated July IS, 1684, provide for Taylor's depart- 
ure with his family on the first opportunity. He advances him £18 for this 
purpose, and appoints him his attorney to take up 5500 acres of land which 
Callowhill had bought of William Penn. Taylor is to receive -±00 acres of 
these lands, to continue to be Callowhill's agent in charge of his property, and 
he is to pay for the advance of money and the land allotted to him a quit 
rent of three pence per acre yearly, the grant being a perpetual one, but the 
quit rent being reserved as was originally intended by Penn in all his grants. 

Until the 25th day of December, 1685, however, the rent tO be paid is to 
be only one dressed buckskin. For Taylor's services he and his heirs are to 
receive sixteen shillings and four pence yearly, and one shilling out of every 
twenty shillings of rent that may be collected. 

Five hundred acres are to be laid out in the first and second streets of 
the city of Philadelphia, and the other five thoiisand are to be laid out in one 
township "accommodated with a navigable river and convenient harbor" (as 
if these were to be had on demand), and Taylor is to "draw the said five thou- 
sand acres in a figure or map expressing what rivers and other bounds is on 
the South, jSTorth, West and East part thereof." 

At the usual rate of voyaging in those days, John Taylor with his family 
probably reached Pennsylvania in the fall of 1684. They presented in 1684 



78 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

two certificates of recommendation from Wiltshire to the Philadelphia Friends' 
Meeting, but there is no record that the elalwrato instructions of Thomas 
Callowhill about locating his lands and building houses and mills were ever 
carried out. 

John Taylor leased a plot of ground on Tinicum Island from Christopher 
Taylor soon after its purchase by Christopher, March 10, 1685, to be used 
as a_ garden or nursery, but it did not prove a suitable location, and he took 
up, in 1G85, a jilot of sixty-three acres of land in Middletown township, near 
what is now called Glen Riddle, in Delaware county, but I have found no other 
note than these of his work after his arrival in America. 

Callowhill had anticipated some diiliculty in having his lands satisfactorily 
located, aiul dir(>cted Taylor in that case to refuse to lay them out, and to 
report to him for further instructions, but communication between Pennsyl- 
vania and England was very slow; John Taylor probably died in 168G, and 
no actual location of Callowhill's lands seems to have been made by him. The 
land m Middletown township was sold in 1717 by his grandson, John Taylor 
(XIV 15), to William Pennell, who built a saw mill there. 

It is noteworthy that among the early settlers of Pennsylvania, the men, 
who were more exposed to the hardships of out-door life than the women, 
were ordinarily much shorter lived. 

After his death, John Taylor's family removed to Thornbury township, 
Chester county, and December 12, 1687, they presented their certificates of 
membership to the Concord Friends' Meeting. The certificate of John Taylor 
and Daniel Osborn was from Kineton Mee'ting in AViltshire. His marriage 
to Hannah Osborn is recorded in the parish register of Alderton, in Wiltshire, 
England. 

The date of his wife's death is not knowTi. She probably did not long 
survive the removal to Thornbury. 

Hannah Taylor and Daniel Osborn were appointed administrators of the 
estate of John Taylor. Daniel was probably Hannah's brother. 

Thomas Taylor (XII 3), of Worthenbury, Flintshire, Wales, bought land 
of William Penn, March 8, 1682, but did not so far as is known come to 
America. His widow, Frances Taylor, passed meeting with John Worrall in 
October, 1683. She married John Worrall in December, 1683. Little else is 
known of Thomas Taylor excejjt that, as has been said before, he acted with 
Christopher Taylor in England as an advocate for the doctrines of the Friends. 

Israel Taylor (XIII 1) was a surgeon. Governor Goodkin in 1709 speaks 
of Israel Taylor, "whose daughter liad like to have been stolen by color of a 
license lately granted to one James Barber, of Chester county." He represented 
Chester county in tiie Pennsylvania Assembly in 1720, 1721 and 1722. He 
was_ Sheriff of Bucks county in 1693, and had the unenviable distinction of 
having hanged the first man who suffered death for crime there. He was his 
father's principal heir, receiving at his death 500 acres of land on the Nesham- 



THE TAYI.OE FAMILY. 79 

iny creek, and 1000 acres on the Delaware river; and he i)nrchased from his 
brother and sister their interests in Tinicum Ishnid, ilarch 1), 1698. He 
lived after that time on Tinicum Island, and practiced his profession there. 
In his will, dated November 17, 1725, he speaks of himself as of Mattiniclinck 
Island, and directs that he shall be buried by his wife in his orchard, where 
several of his children lie. 

ISTotliing but her marriage is known of Mary Taylor (XIII 3). 

The husband of Elizabeth Taylor (XIII 4), Hugh Durborow, was boru 
in Somersetshire, England, about 1660, became a Quaker in early life, suf- 
fered persecution therefor, and emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1684, being then 
apparently engaged to marry Elizabeth Taylor. He probably came over in the 
company of John Taylor. He brought to America a certificate of membership 
from the Friends' Meeting of Ilchester, England, which he presented Decem- 
ber 12, 1687, to Concord Meeting, at the same time as John Taylor's family 
presented theirs. Both he and his wife were preachers. They removed to 
Thornbury township, Chester county, with the rest of John Taylor's family 
in 1687. He bought 100 acres of land in Thornbury township from Thomas 
Bradford, March 1, 1692. In 169.3 they removed to Philadelphia, where he 
died in 1740. He was Constable of Thornbury township in 1687. 

Jacob Taylor (XIII 5) is supposed to have received his early education 
in Christopher Taylor's school, but his father died when he was about thirteen 
years old, and as we find a record of his having been instructed by Thomas 
Holme, Surveyor General, July 5, 1689, when he was sixteen years of age, 
to copy some papers relating to a Iwundary line to be run for the purpose of 
locating one of Penn's purchases of land from the Indians, it is evident that 
he early began life on his own account. He seems to have retained a connection 
with the Surveyor General's office, but his first profession was probably that 
of a schoolmaster. He is said to have been teaching in Abington, now Mont- 
gomery county, in 1701, and Davis in his history of Bucks county says that he 
taught an academy in Philadelphia in 1738, and he elsewhere speaks of his 
"celebrated classical school" in Philadelphia. 

In the earliest days of Penn's colony, when every grantee was urgent to 
have his laud surveyed, and the supply of competent surveyors was inadequate, 
there was much inaccurate work done, the errors made being generally in favor 
of the purchaser, who received much more land than his warrant entitled him 
to have. Many also of those who purchased failed to complete their pay- 
ments and allowed their grants to lapse, so that Penu finding the land accounts 
in confusion, and his revenue quite inadequate to the maintenance of his 
government, was obliged in 1701 to order resurveys made, to define the relative 
rights of himself and his grantees. These resurveys were naturally unpopular, 
the community making practically common cause against the proprietor, and 
they were the cause of nuich heart-burning for several y( ars. 



80 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

James Logan, Secretary of the Province, wrote to \Yilliam Penn under 
date of May 3, 1702 :— 

"Very much as regards reveniie depends upon resurveys, which go on 
briskly enough in such places where we can expect to get anything. 

"We are all well provided" (with surveyors) "in Bucks and Chester. 
Jac. Taylor, the young man there mentioned, who has wrote a pretty almanac 
for the year, one of which comes enclosed, has also had the same distemper, 
now greatly reigning amongst lis, which has been a second hindrance." 

The previous mention of the "yoimg man" Jacob Taylor had been in 
a letter from Isaac Norris; the "distemper" was the small-pox, and the 
first "hindrance" to the resurveys was the death, by that disease, of the Surveyor 
General, Edward Pennington, which occurred Januai-y 10, 1702. Penning- 
ton was the third Surveyor General of the province, having succeeded John 
Wilkinson, April 26, 1C9S. Upon his death Jacob Taylor, who was then teach- 
ing in Abiugton, was put in charge of the land office, but he was not com- 
missioned Sui'veyor General till March 20, 170G. The reeoi-ds of his work 
in this capacity are very vobiminous, but are not generally of special interest in 
a narrative of his career. A few notes of the siirveyor's work which he did 
outside of his regular land office duties will suffice to illustrate this depart- 
ment of his activity. 

December 14, 1719, Mayor William Fishbourne and Alderman Hill, in 
conjunction with the Regulators, were requested by the Philadelphia City 
Council "to Imploy Jacob Taylor to run out the seven streets of this city, and 
that they cause the same to be staked out to prevent any Incroachment that 
may happen for ye want thereof." 

A draft of this survey is among the Taylor papers. 

He accompanied Governor William Keith in 1722 to locate lands west of 
the Susquehanna river, which were in the belt so long in dispute between Penn- 
sylvania and Maryland. In 1729 he surveyed for the proprietor "Conestoge 
Manor," in what is now Lancaster county. 

But while all of his work as Surveyor General seems to have been well 
done, that which brought him most esteem and praise among his contempo- 
raries was in the direction of literature, and while his attempts in that line 
are as likely now to create anuisement as any other emotion, they are of 
interest as showing what were the highest attainments of the literary art in 
this province in those days, and what entitled a man in the estimation of his 
contemporaries to the hope of lasting renown. 

He compiled from his own original writings, from the contributions of 
his fellows, and from standard works, an almanac, to the first number of 
which, that for the year 1702, James Logan alludes in the letter quoted above. 
This he continued to publish for many years. 

Bean in his history of Montgomery county says that the publication was 
carried on from 1702 to 1746, with the probable omission of the numbers from 
1715 to 1718, both inclusive, and tlio number for 1722. An almanac in these 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 81 

days in an unimportant affair, but in the beginning of the eighteenth century 
it was the sole literary equipment of many a household, the Bible being, per- 
haps, the second book in frequency of possession, and a book or two of theology 
the third and fourth, but after a long interval. 

Paul Leicester Ford, in his late introduction to the republication of some 
of Benjamin Franklin's wise and witty sayings originally published in Poor 
Richard's Almanac, says: "Few, if any, now living can appreciate how large 
a space this little pamphlet of a dozen leaves filled only one hundred years ago, 
and this importance increases as we trace it back to its first appearance in 
this country * * *. With the exception of the Bible, it was often the year's 
sole reading matter in many families * * *. To their readers, who still 
believed in witchcraft, governing stars and horoscopes, the composition of an 
almanac savored of magic, sorcery, if not illicit communication with departed 
spirits, and the authors were therefore to them most awe inspiring beings." 

"Perhaps nothing better illustrates the place once held in American 
literature by these ephemera than the annals of American printing. A col- 
lection of the first issues of the early American presses established in the 
various towns would, with hardly an exception, consist of these little waifs." 

Franklin commenced the issue of Poor Richard's Almanac in 1733, and 
continued it for twenty-five years. Jacob Taylor's Almanac, therefore, ante- 
dated it a quarter of a century. 

Ford says, quoting largely from Poor Richard's Almanac for 1747, "In 
1746 by the death of that 'Ornament and Head of our Profession, Mr. Jacob 
Taylor, who for upwards of forty years (with some few intermissions only) 
supplied the good people of this and the neighboring Colonics with the most 
complete ephemeris and the most accurate calculations that have hitherto 
appeared in America, and who was said to have assisted in the preparation of 
Poor Richard's, the most serious rival of this latter was removed.' " Franklin 
says further of Jacob Taylor in the same article, "He was an ingenious mathe- 
matician, as well as an expert and skilful astronomer, and, moreover, no mean 
philosopher, but what is more than all, he was a pious and honest man. 
Requiescat in pace." 

Franklin goes on to announce that, "since my friend Taylor is no more, 
whose ephemerides so long and agreeably served and entertained these Provinces, 
I have taken the liberty to imitiate his well known method." 

He follows this notice by nineteen lines of poetry, apostrophizing Taylor's 
blest spirit now gone into the starry heavens, and asking his guidance there, 
but rather, apparently, for astronomical purposes than for any spiritual end. 
But the poetry is too poor and too pointless for quotation, though it seems 
quite sincere in its panegyric. Franklin's pen was usually somewhat caustic, 
and there must have been few persons whom he so unreservedly praised as he 
did Jacob Taylor. 

The "accurate calculations" are said to have been made by Jacob Taylor 



82 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

himself, and this alone showed an amount of mathematical and astronomical 
knowledge which was probably possessed by but few people at that time, so 
that his contemporaries were probably right in considering him one of the most 
learned men in the colony. He probably wrote a large part of the literary 
contents also, but as the almanac became famous many of the aspiring writers 
of his time contributed "copy" which they hoped he would find good enough to 
print. The almanac evidently, in addition to all its other uses, filled the place 
now taken by the magazines, and many young birds essayed in its pages to try 
their wings for their first flights in literature. 

There are among the Taylor papers many of these offerings, and most of 
them are very poor stuff. Xo doubt they are mostly rejected work, and they 
generally richly deserved to die. Perhaps the best of them, which modesty, 
or want of space, may have prevented Taylor from publishing, is the following, 
which well shows the esteem in which he was held as a man and as a teacher: 

"The Toil of teaching, and the Master's s-kill, 
To lead his Pupils up that arduous hill 
Which he himself ascended long before. 
Repeats the Labours which in youth he bore; 
As then he knew that in the steep ascent 
Laborious days and studious nights' were spent, 
So still he feels the beating Pulse of art; 
No less the Task that Learning to impart 
In human Life and all below the Sun, 
Such constant Streams of Endless Labours run; 
The patient Plowman suff'ring cold and heat. 
In harvest reaps the price of dripping sweat. 

"So learning grows, with hard and bitter roots. 
But fragrant branches and delicious fruits; 
But fruits unknown, and strangers to the taste. 
In rural groves where now your Lot is cast; 
What Muse can sing, what Prophet can declare, 
What strange caprice of Fortune brought thee here? 
And say yet further with unerring s-kill. 
If your approach presages good or ill. 
The work is good with skilful hand to sow. 
The seed of Learning where the Grain will grow: 
• ' •■ But tender hearts the dreadful sound may fear 

Of Moods and Tenses, Tropes and Figures here. 

• ' • "Survey the spot, consider well the ground. 

With ten mile Radius- draw the circle round; 
Some pretty schools within the circle lie. 
Whose Masters may your labored art defie, 
The case is past dispute, for one of these 
In half a year, a quarter, if you please. 
May by his- Dictates bring young men or boys 
To as much Learning as himself enjoys; 
But thy Disciples must with patience bear 
Some years of Labour, and thy forming care. 
Before their Learning will with thine compare." 

The allusion to "rural groves" relates probably to Taylor's announcing, 
in 1733, hi.s purpose to call his nephew's residence in Chester county his home, 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 83 

and tlie "circle with ten miles radius" was, perhaps, suggested by the circular 
northern boundary of Delaware which his brother Isaac surveyed in 1701. 

In his almanac for 1723 he calls in his art as a writer and his science as 
an astrologer, to portray the future destiny of the infant city whose streets 
he had laid out four years before, and we have the following prediction : — 

"Pull forty years have now their changes made, 
Since the foundations of this town were laid; 
When Jove and Saturn were in Leo joined. 
They saw the survey of the place designed; 
Swift were these planets, and the world will own 
Swift was the progress of this rising town. 
The Lion is an active regal sign, 
And Sol beheld the two superiors join; 
A City built with such propitious rays. 
Will live to see old walls and happy days; 
But Kingdoms, Cities, men in every State 
Are subject to vicissitudes of fate, 
An envious cloud may shade the smiling morn. 
Though fates ordain the beaming sun's return." 

One contributor sends material for Taylor to work over into an epitaph 
to Dr. John Keariley, and asks him "to compose it in a few verses to be set up 
in a frame in our church," which was Christ church, Philadelphia. Examples 
appear among the communications sent him of rhyming rules to ascertain the 
content of ground ; and suggestions of various sorts are made in the hope that 
Taylor will find them worthy to be worked up for his almanac. 

Among these papers are some of scientific interest. Thomas Godfrey, 
M-hose invention of the sextant in November, 17-'jO, conferred honor on the city 
in which he lived, and has ever since proved the greatest of boons to all who 
navigate the seas, sends him, under date of November 4, 17-41, observations 
made with a twelve-foot telescope of "the transits behind the moon of Jupiter 
on March 12, 1741, and of Venus October 31, 1741, which phenomena," says 
Godfrey, "you had foretold in your almanack." 

James Logan forwards to him similar observStions of the transit of the 
star Aldebaran on February 25, 1718. 

James Logan, who was, perhaps, the most learned man in Pennsylvania, 
apparently considered Taylor's almanac a very serious production. He writes 
him, December 20, 1743, in the playful and affectionate tone which one so 
rarely finds in the writing of his strenuous and uncompromising time in a post- 
script to his letter: 

"Since ye above I have got thy new Almanack, and I wish thou wouldest 
inform mc where thou pick't up that ridiculous story of the Tyrant Cloritius 
Censorious, and ye ingenious villain (as thou calls him) Paterculus. If from 
Plutarch's Parallels, the parallels there to ye other more credible stories are 
generally accounted Greek fictions, and tho' they may do for an Almanack, they 
are unworthy of thine. I like thy last Invectives against Lies, which prevail 
most exceedingly, much better than thy Collection of Stories in thy last." 



84 THE SMITH COLL.VTEEAL ANCESTRY. 

Taylor's almanacs were published iu Philadelphia. Bean, in his history 
of Montgomery county, says that Jansen and Johnson were two of his pub- 
lishers. Andrew Bradford was the publisher in 1739, and for some years pre- 
viously; Isaiah Warner, from 1743 to 1745, and in October, 1745, William 
Bradford writes Taylor that he would like to become the publisher, Mr. Warner 
being dead. The edition for 1743 consisted of two thousand copies. 

Mr. J. Breintnall, himself an author, writes to Andrew Bradford, printer, 
October 29, 1739, that he, as publisher of Jacob Taylor's Almanacs, should 
publish "An Enchiridion that should contain a collection from his Almanacks 
for some years past, of Poetry, pieces of History, and useful observations of 
various kinds, with some of his Prefaces and Chronologies, which would afford 
good Entertainment to curious Readers, and be serviceable to all sorts." 

Among the Taylor papers there is a list of books, with prices attached, 
which is endorsed ''Acct. of Books delivered R. Gunter, 2nd mouth, 1701," and 
another list headed "Account of ye disposal of ChurchiU's Books," which 
accounts for the sale of several hundreds of valuable books, such as 25 volumes 
of Locke's various works, Dampier's Voyages, Hennepin's Voyages, Milton's 
works, Machiavelli, Sir William Temple, Diodonis Siculus, etc., etc. They 
vs^re bought by varioiis persons, the proprietor, S. Carpenter, P. Fainnan, 
James Logan and others. These transactions might indicate that libraries 
were consigned to him from England to be disposed of by him; and that he 
sold them shows that there was a market for such wares in Pennsylvania. 

Another paper seems to suggest that Jacob Taylor had charge of a library 
belonging to the proprietor. These books were loaned to proper persons, and 
charges to them for these loans appear in the account. 

Thomas Fairman, one of the prominent men iu the early history of the 
Colony, agent in Pennsylvania of the "Pennsylvania Land Company in Lon- 
don," one of Governor Markham's Council, and a Justice of the Upland Court 
before the arrival of William Penn in 1682, left to Jacob Taylor, by his will, 
dated December 12, 1710, his globes and his chime of bells; to be held by 
Taylor during his life, and to revert, after Taylor's death, to the testator's son, 
Thomas Fairman. 

When Jacob Taylor reached his sixty-first year, he was probably no longer 
able to lead so active a life as the duties of the Surveyor General's office 
required, and his other occupations may have been more congenial to his tastes. 
He retired from the position, and Benjamin Eastburn was commissioned as 
his successor October 29, 1733. 

He seems thereafter to have considered the house of his nephew, John 
Taylor (XIV 15), his home, but he must have spent most of his time in Phila- 
delphia, where his academy and his literary work largely engrossed his 
attention. 

Benjamin Eastburn, who was Taylor's assistant before he became his suc- 
cessor, had apparently incurred some pecuniary obligation to him, about which 
there was some curious correspondence. 



Till'; TAYI.OII KA.MII.V. 35 

Nicholas Scull, who in turn succeeded I'.cnjainiu Kastl)urn as Surveyor 
Gfueral, writes February 5, 1736, to Jacob Taylor, askinji; him for an order 
on Benjamin Eastburn for some money. With an expression of the highest 
esteem for Jacob Taylor, Scull concludes his letter with the hope that this 
modest request for money will not lessen their ancient friendship, and his 
emotions being stirred, he drojis into poetry after this fashion: — 

"Shall sordid Pelf our ffriendshii) ee'r Distroy" 
"Or want of Cash the sacrod Knot untie" 
"No! Jacob, No! I hope our ffriondship's pure" 
"And will whilo we have beating hearts endure." 

Eastburn does not seem to have responded satisfactorily, and it became 
necessary for Taylor to write him June 2, 17;59: — 

"Me. Eastburx : — 

"These few lines are to desire about as many from you in answer to my 
last. Procrastination (if too long) is equal to a Denial, and sometimes worse, 
but from vou T expect better. 

"I am. Sir, 

1 ours, 
"J. T." 

Eastburn replies very amiably September 19, 1T:)0, acknowledging his 
indebtedness and remitting an account thereof. 

The correspondence closes with a letter from Scull to Taylor, dated -TiJy 
10, 1743, in which he makes some suggestions as to interesting matter to he 
put into Taylor's Almanac, which he seems to consider a wonderful production. 

Jacob Taylor never married. He seems to have always retained an 
affectionate regard for his kindred, and, in fact, the records disclose in him 
the kindliest character that I have met among the eighteenth century members 
of my family. 

He writes to Isaac Taylor, who was his Deputy Surveyor, and whom he 
addresses as "Loving Brother," under date of May 14, 1713, a letter about 
some surveys that were needed, and says, referring to Isaac's illness, of which 
he has just heard — "I much prefer to hear of thy recovery, and then furnish 
thee with more of these worldly affairs." He continues — "Jose])h Robinson 
is now in haste (it's the fa.shi(m of several to come when liieir horses are 
saddled), and I shall only say with jiraycrs for the return of thy sanity and 

strength, 

"Thine, 

"Jacob Taylor." 

He writes to his nephew, John Taylor, July 1."), 1731 — "If you .send me 
a line by the messenger of this, it will seem to add something to my little life, 
much more if that informs nie that yourself will eoTue soon after." 
6 



86 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

His kindly nature elicited kind feeling in return. 

James Logan, who was one of the first men in the Province in position, 
in learning and in sterling worth, seems to have had a sincere affection for 
Taylor. He writes him from Stenton December 20, 1743, sending him two 
treatises which he had written — one on "Generation," and another on "Optics," 
the deep calculations of which latter treatise, Logan says, are entirely his own. 
He closes his letter thus — "As I am lame thou knows, and now grown vory 
feeble, I can but rarely visit Philadelphia ; were it otherwise thy distance from 
hence should not, I assiire thee, prevent me of the pleasure of one other sight 
of my old friend thyself ; their number being now so exceedingly reduced, and 
I never forget such, but more especially those of such worth as I well know 
thee to be, and I would account it a very great obligation to be favored by a 
visit from thee, in which I hope thou would find some entertainment from the 
company of thv old affectionate friend. 

"J. Logan." 

His life drew peacefully to its close. His humor grew gradually in bis 
later years to be rather serious ; he has a kindly sarcasm for what he calls 
"the little foolish farse of life," and he fell in his writing, as ageing men are 
apt to fall, somewhat into the vein of "the weary king Ecclesiast." 

He ended his life March 2, 1746, at the house of his nephew, John Taylor, 
who was then his nearest living relative. He was always a member of the 
Society of Friends. His nephew, John Taylor (XIV 15), was appointed 
to administer his estate. 

Isaac Taylor (XIII 6) was a "practitioner of Physick," as well as a sur- 
veyor. As there was no school of medicine in America in his time, and the 
"art and mystery" of healing had, therefore, to be handed on from physicians 
who had been educated in the older countries to their pupils, it is probable 
that he gained his knowledge from his cousin, Israel Taylor. He was too 
intelligent a man to have entered upon the practice of that profession without 
proper instruction, and his calling as a physician was admitted, and was recog- 
nized in some of the documents that still siirvive. 

He married, in 1694, Martha, daughter of Philip Roman, and soon aftei'- 
ward settled in Thornbury township, Chester county, which remained his home 
during his whole life. Tlis name does not appear among the taxables in 
Thornbury in 1693, but is on the list for 1696. 

The tradition of the family, as voiced by his great-granddaughter, IMrs. 
Martha Morris, born 1783 (Frazer XVI 8), represents that "they must have 
been accustomed to pretty high living, for their house in Thornbury was 
superior to houses in this country generally, and they had a separate house for 
their servants. Isaac's wife also kept a dressing maid." 

Mrs. Morris says further that Isaac and Jacob Taylor were men of 
superior education, and there is other testimony, notably that of Smith in his 
History of Delaware County, to the same effect. 



THK TAYLOK FAMILY. 87 

Isaac Taylor was certainly a man in comfortable circumstances. In 
Thornbury township his property was assessed in 1722 at £80. Ilis Thorn- 
bury farm was on the east side of Chester creek. 

The existing records of his life, however, refer chiefly, not to his activities 
as an owner of real estate, or as a physician, but to his work as a surveyor. 
He was, in 1701, appointed Deputy Surveyor for Chester county, succeeding 
Henry Hollingsworth, and he was actively engaged during the rest of his life 
in the duties pertaining to that oiHce. Soon after his appointment he was 
commissioned on the part of Pennsylvania, October 28, 1701, to run the 
boundary lino dividing New Castle county from Chester county, Thomas Pier- 
son, Surveyor of New Castle county, holding a similar commission on the 
part of that county. The warrant for the work required the surveyors to meet 
the Magistrates of the two counties, and "in their presence to admeasure and 
survey from the town of New Castle, the distance of twelve miles in a right 
line up ye said river, and from ye said distance, according to ye King's letters 
patent and deeds from the Duke, and ye said circular line to be well marked 
two-thirds parts of ye semi-circle." 

There is among the Taylor papers a draft of the tovm of New Castle, 
Delaware, showing the beginning of the boundary line, and another showing 
in detail the streams crossed by the circidar line as it sweeps around from the 
Delaware river to the crossing of the Christiana creek. 

This work was performed December 4, 1701, and Ashmcad, in his His- 
tory of Delaware County, says that this survey is the only one ever made of 
the circular boundary between Delaware and Pennsylvania. A resurvey was 
ordered May 28, 1715, but it was not made, and the line traced by Isaac 
Taylor still remains the boundary after two hundred years. The survey was 
less costly than some later ones have been. The Grand Jury for Chester 
county found, February 24, 1702, that the proper charges for the work 
amounted to twenty-six pounds, nine shillings, and they therefore allowed the 
account. 

The circular boundary line was confirmed by the Pennsylvania Legisla- 
ture in 1715; and by the Council November 7, 1710, and Governor Keith, 
under date of August 12, 1724, notified the Assembly of Delaware that he 
"will observe it as their boundary in all fviturc orders." 

It is curious to note how much our family has been connected with bound- 
ary surveys. Isaac Taylor, who was my great-grandmother's great-grand- 
father, in 1701 ran the boimdary between Delaware and Pennsylvania; his 
son, John Taylor, ran the Pennsylvania-Maryland boundary as far west as the 
Susquehanna river, and in 1732 continued the suiwey ninety miles to the west- 
ward of the Susquehanna; my grandfather, Joseph Smith, was, in 1795, one 
of the party who surveyed the western part of the boundary between Pennsyl- 
vania and New York; and I was, from 1857 to 1864, one of the astronomers 
on the survey of the northwestern boundary of the Fnited States, from the 
Rocky mountains to the Pacific ocean. 



88 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

Tliis survey, in 1701, was by no means the last that Isaac Taylor was to 
liear about provincial boundaries. 

In November, 1722, Governor William Keith reported to the Council 
Board that the Magistrates of Cecil county, Maryland, had very unkindly made 
prisoners of Isaac Taylor, the Surveyor, a Magistrate and member of Assembly 
for the County of Chester, and Elisha Gatchel, another Magistrate of the same 
county, and bound them over to appear at Cecil Court. The Governor reasons 
that, as Isaac Taylor was taken only for surveying to the northward of the line 
which this province has always claimed, and Elisha Gatchel on an action 
founded on falsehood, and as to try such a case by either province on a matter 
in dispute between them would be no better than determining it by force, 
therefore, the Board should advise, and it did advise, that the Governor of 
Maryland be asked to stay proceedings, and the proprietor be asked to press 
in England for a final adjustment of the boundary line. 

Governor Keith asks his Council to advise him whether these men should 
report to the authorities of Maryland, as they have agreed to do, on November 
24. Council advises that they ought not by any means to do so, and that the 
Governor ought to support them in defence of their just rights. 

Isaac Taylor rendered an account against the proprietor for his time and 
expenses in this afFair, which aggregate £47 5s. lOd. 

Under date of December 16, he charges "to four and twenty days I was 
kept in prison in Maryland with expenses £20," so that it is probable that 
Isaac was as good as his word, and went back to Maryland, and stood his trial 
as he had promised to do. 

December 15, 1702, he was ordered by the Council to lay out on Kidlcy 
creek, in Willistown township, Chester county, a tract of four hundred acres 
of land as a reservation for the Okekocking Indians. On this tract they lived 
for many years. 

He held various offices in the county, and under the Proprietor. James 
Logan, as Eeceiver General for the Proprietor, appointed him, December 11, 
1704, Collector of Quit rents for the County of Chester. The latest record 
of his discharge of the duties of this position is in 1711. He was a member 
of the Pennsvlvania Assembly in 1704, 1705, 1710, 1712, 1719, 1721 and 
1722. 

He was appointed a Justice by Governor Evans in 1719, and was reap- 
pointed from time to time till his death, in 1728. 

He was County Commissioner of Chester county from 1726 till his death. 

So far as we can gather from the records of his life, Isaac Taylor, like 
Isaac of the Biblical story, was a quiet man. His career was not as full of 
interest as that of his brother, Jacob, and not as intense as that of his son, 
John, but he apparently filled creditably all positions in which he was placed, 
and was a worthy and estimable citizen. 

He was a member of the Society of Friends, and a subscriber June 10, 
1697. to the erection of the Concord Meeting house. 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 



89 



The date of his death is not exactly known. His will is dated May 14, 
1728, and proved June 4, 1728. It appoints his wife and his son, John, his 
executors, and his brothers-in-law, Philip and Jacob Roman, assistant executors, 
He gives his home plantation in Thornbury township, containing 146 acres, to 
his wife, Martha, during her life, to go to her son, Philip, after her death. To 
his son John 100 acres in Concord township, bought of James Chevers. To 
his son Jacob the northern half of his tract of 500 acres in Bradford township. 
He disposes of his large surveying instrument to Jacob his son. 

"What little is known of his wife, Martha Roman, will be found in the 
history of the Roman family. 

GENERATION XIV. 



anx 
so. 


MEMBER OP TAMILT. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCB. 


The Children of Israel Taylor (XIII 1). 


IV 

1 


Christopher Ta.vlor. 








Dec, 1748. 




2 


Thomas Ta.vlor. 












3 


Benjamin Ta.vlor. 
Israel Taylor. 








about 1734. 




4 


Samuel Taylor. 


Elizabeth Wright. 










5 


Mary Taylor. 


I. Jonas Sandelands. 
II. Arthur Shield. 










« 


Diana Taylor. 


Oartman. 










7 


Hannah Taylor. 


Lloyd. 










8 


Eleanor Taylor. 


Molloy. 










» 


Sarah Taylor. 


Bailey. 










10 


Martha Taylor. 


Enoch Elliot. 










The Children of Elizabeth Taylor (XIII 4) and Hugh Durborow. 


1 


John Durborow. 


Sarah Day. 


Dec. 24, 1686. 


Oct. 12. 1710. 




Philadelphia, Pa. 


2 


Hugh Durborow. 


Hannah Albertson. 


Jan. 11. 1689. 


July 11, 1723. 




Kent Co., Md. 


3 


Daniel Durborow. 


Sarah Coleman. 


May 4, 1691. 








4 


Hannah Durborow. 




Jan. 20, 1696. 








T, 


Elizabeth Durborow. 




Oct. 21, 1700. 








6 


Isaac Durborow. 




Jan. 8. 1694. 








7 


Joseph Durborow. 




Apr. 20, 1699. 








8 


Mary Durborow. 




Jan. 1, 1703. 








19 


Jacob Durborow. 




Feb. 3, 1705. 










1 


'HE Children of Isaac Taylor (XIII 3) and Martha Roman. 




20 


John Taylor. 


I. Mary Worrilow 

Baker. 
II. Elizabeth Moore. 


1697. 


I.Sept.10,1718 
II. Oct., 1734 


March, 175G. 


Thornbury Twp., 

Chester Co. 


21 


Jacob Taylor. 


Grace Worrilow. 


about 1700. 


Oct. 13, 1728. 


about 1745. 


Whiteland Twp., 

Chester Co. 


22 


Philip Taylor. 


never married. 


about 1702. 




about 1749. 




23 


Ann Taylor. 


I. Sam'l Savage. Jr. 
II. George Taylor. 


about 1705. 


1733. 






a 


Mary Taylor. 


I. Harry Young. 
II. Samuel Brogdon. 


about 1706. 


I. 1733 
II. 1737 




Chester Twp., 

Chester Co. 



90 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

John Taylor (XI\' 30). The date of his birth is approximate. He 
says, September 'J, 17;35, in his deposition before Thomas Lawrence, Mayor 
of Piiiladelphia, in regard to the running of the Pennsylvania-Maryland 
Boundary, west of the Susquehanna, that "be is thirty-seven years of age or 
thereabouts," and while this statement for some reason does not claim to be 
exact, it is best, perhaps, to take his birth year as 1697, though an earlier year 
would fit better with the dates of his mother's marriage and his own. He was 
live years younger than his wife, which would lead bini to state his age as 
being as great as truth would allow. 

Our information in regard to his adult life is very voluminous. There 
are few men who lived a century and a half aoo in Pennsylvania who have 
left more documentary evidence of the work of their lives. lie kept, for many 
3'ears, a memorandum book into which went all sorts of details of business and 
family affairs, and hundreds of his papers of various sorts are still in existence. 

He married, as a very young man, Mary, the widow of Joseph Baker, Jr., 
and the daughter of John Worrilow. She was somewhat of an heiress in the 
right of her father and her husband, having large landed possessions in Thorn- 
bury township. 

John Taylor's father and the widow were the executors of the estate of 
her deceased husband, Joseph Baker, Jr., but the business soon fell into the 
hands of the son. Pie and Mrs. Baker were near neighbors, and the intimacy 
which gTew up during the settlement of Joseph Baker's estate ended in mar- 
riage, after which John Taylor took up his residence at his wife's home, and 
he s]ient there his whole life. He bought from the estate of Joseph Baker 
430 acres of land in Edginont, where he settled, so that the farm became his 
own. I can find no record of the date of her death. In an agreement, dated 
April 17, 1723, relating to the settlement of the estate of Mary AVorrilow's 
grandfather, Thomas Worrilow, the names of all her brothers and sisters are 
recited, except the youngest, who was then a child of 13. Mary's name is 
missing, but it seems hardly credible that she, who bore at least five children 
to John Taylor, should have died in less than five years after her marriage, 
and I can only account for her name not appearing by the fact that her hus- 
band, John Taylor, was the jiarty with whom all the Worrilow heirs were mak- 
ing an agreement, and she probably could not appear on their side, as her 
interest would then be opposed to her husband's. If this view is correct, I 
think it probable that she lived till aboxit 1733. 

John Taylor, ado])ted the profession of his father, and is styled in some 
of the extant official documents "Practitioner of Physick." There are many 
notes in his memorandum books which relate to his medical career. Besides 
noting several medical and surgical cases, for some of which he makes a charge, 
while he makes none in other cases, he casually mentions the remedies used 
in his practice, such as Camphor, Sal. Epsom, Ipecacuanha, Sal. Vit., Mer- 
curius Ihdc, Calomel, Gum Arabick, Tart. Emetic, etc., vigorous remedies, and 
no doubt applied in heroic doses, such as befitted a sturdy race engaged in the 



THE TAYLOR FAIIIIA'. 91 

hard and manly work of anbduing a continent. He is said to have been the 
only practicing physician between Chester and Lancaster, so that he probably 
was not called in for trifling ailments. 

He was a farmer on a large scale. His home farm is said to have con- 
tained twelve hundred acres, and he followed his father's example in picking 
up choice pieces of ground which his practice as a surveyor brought to his 
notice in different parts of the county. Pie notes the sale on several occasions 
of his crop of hemp to his father-in-law, John Worrilow, and of wheat to his 
brother Jacob. In 1741t he desires James Webb to send him from Lancaster 
county as much red clover seed as will sow ten acres of land for pasture. At 
that time the use of red clover was just commencing, its virtues having been 
discovered in Great Britain only a few years before, and the seed was not easily 
obtainable. He is said to have had a large house, and a beautifully cultivated 
garden, and to have been learned in botany, which was probably considered a 
more necessary part of medical lore in days when the i>hysician had, to a great 
extent, to grow and compound his own remedies, than it is now. Scientific 
botany was then unknown of course but there was perhaps as umch practical 
knowledge of the value of herbs as there is at present. He grew large quanti- 
ties of the old English red rose, the leaves of which had a medicinal use, and 
from them, from lavender and other hcrlw he distilled "waters" on a large 
scale. 

In a community which had been set as Penn's colony was, to learn by 
experience the art of self-government, the strong men naturally gravitated 
toward public life, and John Taylor held many positions in the service of the 
colony. He was the Sheriff of Chester county by annual appointment of the 
Governor from 1720 to 1731, a longer time than the office has been hehl by 
any other man; he was a member of Assembly in 1730 and 1731, and a Justice 
of the Peace, ajipointed in 1741, and holding office till 1745. Several drafts 
of political papers, and of addresses to the authorities, and to the public remain 
to attest his activity in this line. January 2, 1741, he addresses a letter to 
the Commissioners and Assessors of Chester county, who probably were re- 
sponsible for the nomination to the Governor of fit persons for the position of 
County Treasurer. In this letter he recites "various efforts he had made for 
several years past to introduce economy in the management of public affairs, 
and feeling himself obliged, in regard to the repeated favors which the freemen 
of Chester county have shown him, to make such an acknowledgment to them, 
in defence of any unnecessary expense or exorbitant demands that should be 
attempted to be laid on them, and understanding that the Treasurer charged 
exorbitant sums for handling the public money," he advises them "that he 
is willing to ser\'e the county as Treasurer without bringing any account against 
the public for the same." 

The Commissioners and Assessors decide that, as the present Treasurer 
(who was Joseph Brinton) makes the same offer, they see no reason to change 
the incumbent. His proposition, if made now, would be considered a sus- 



92 THE SMITH COI.LATERAL ANCESTEY. 

picioiis one, but as he was a man of large means and excellent position, and 
unblemished character, it is probable that his offer was declined chiefly because 
it was thought that he had held a sufficient number of public positions. Pos- 
sibly, too, as he grew somewhat imperious in his later years, he was no longer 
popular, and the authorities may have preferred to appoint a more flexible 
person. 

He seems to have drafted papers on all sorts of subjects for all sorts of 
people, such as Wills, Deeds and Agreements, and to have been executor or ad- 
ministrator of a numlier of estates, so that it seems marvelous how any one could 
have found time to do all that he did. 

December 2, 1742, he makes for William Plumstead, Registrar-General, 
an elaborate statement of "the practice of Justices of the Peace in Philadelphia, 
in settling intestates' accounts in the Orphans' Court ;" and for his own use he 
prepared a "Memorandum of Wills," showing the points to be made, and to 
be guarded in drawing them. 

In his memorandum book he notes that he requires a copy of Swinburne's 
Treatment of Testaments and Last Wills, and The Clerk's Remembrancer, by 
G. Jacobs. 

Among the Taylor papers is a vigorous letter to William Moore, who I 
conjecture was his second wife's brother-in-law, taking him to task for some 
political intrigue in which he was engaged with Isaac Wayne, father of Anthony 
Wayne. This letter was apparently written about 1741. Evidently, the 
coalition of interests between Wayne and Moore was not to Taylor's profit, and 
he speaks harshly of both of the men. 

But his imperiousness comes out nowhere so noticeably as it does in his 
quarrel with his second wife. This marriage was apparently an imhappy one. 
There had been trouble from the beginning. Something in the manner of the 
marriage did not please the Society of Friends. It may have been that his 
Avife was not of that persuasion, but whatever it was, they called him to account, 
and set a day for a hearing. He did not attend, and afterward plead the 
urgency of the Proprietor's business as an excuse ; but he writes, December 7, 
1734, to his friends, Harry Obourn and Ralph Eavenson, expressing his desire 
for peace and harmony, but plainly intending that the case shall not be decided 
adversely to him without his defence having been first heard. June 2, 1735, 
he made an acknowledg-ment in regard to his second marriage, which was ac- 
cepted by the Meeting. The matter ended, however, by both of them being 
disowned in 1745 and May 3, 1746. 

Started badly, it continued to go badly, and at a later date he denounces 
his wife most roundly for extravagance, neglect of his interests, and of his 
children, and proceeds to such length that it would seem as if there could have 
been no reconciliation. 

Put after his death she received her share of the estate, which she con- 
trolled and managed during her widowhood. She oiitlived him sixteen years, 
and in her M'ill, dated Eebruary 28, 1772, after leaving some small legacies to 



THE TAYLOK FAMILY. 93 

her own relatives, she, having herself no children, bequeaths all the remainder 
of her estate to Dr. Taylor's grandchildren, Mary Worrall Frazer and Sarah 
Thomson, so that some way of healing the breach must have been found. Her 
own property she left to her friend, Daniel Calvert. 

There remains, so far as I can discover, no unfavorable tradition in regard 
to her, and it may be that her husband judged her too hardly. 

This second wife's maiden name was Elizabeth Jones, but at the time of 
her marriage to John Taylor she was the widow of John Moore, who Gilbert 
Cope suggests was John Moore, Jr., of Birmingham, Pa., a son of John and 
Margaret Moore, of Thornbury, Delaware Co., Pa. John Moore, Jr., made 
his will October 8, 1733, and left his widow, Elizabeth, executrix. They 
apparently had no children. 

John Taylor evidently was a masterful man, accustomed to rule, and not 
easy to deal with when his will was thwarted, and his temper did not improve 
as he grew older. 

For his time, he must have been in affluent circumstances. He was evi- 
dently the capitalist of the family; his books abound with memoranda of 
advances to his own and his first wife's family. He continued to loan money 
or to give credits at his store to his children for some years after their marriages, 
giving his sons positions in his service, but not dividing his estate. It may 
iiave been that his denial of initiative to them prevented their business develo]> 
ment. Certain it is that the ability of the family died with him, and after 
his death one gets from the family papers an impression that the business had 
no head, and that his large estate was unskillfully administered. 

One of the greatest business interests of his life was in connection with 
the iron works which he called "Sarum Forge." 

There is no definite note of the commencement of the manufacture of iron 
about the locality which is now known as Glen ilills, in Thornbury towmship, 
Delaware county. Dr. John Huddleson (XVIII 1), born 1800, who was a 
great-great-gi-audson of Dr. John Taylor (XIV 20), and who lived on the old 
Taylor place, and, therefore, was probably well informed as to the family his- 
tory, believed that Sarum forge antedated Dr. Taylor's ownership of the prop- 
erty. The land came into his possession through his marriage with Mary 
Baker, born Worrilow. It was part of a tract of 1,500 acres granted originally 
by William Penn to John Simcock, a member of the Free Society of Traders, 
and one of the largest purchasers of Pennsylvania lands in England. Joseph 
Baker, John Worrilow and Daniel Iloopes bought 500 acres of this tract, 
March 12, 1699. Mary Worrilow, who was a daughter of John Worrilow, a 
daughter-in-law of Joseph Baker, and a niece of Jean Worrilow, the wife of 
Daniel Hoopes, combined, curiously, parts of the interests of all the owners of 
this land, upon which, as the wife of Joseph Baker, she lived. John Taylor, 
who married her September 10, 1718, bought out the titles of the partners so 
far as his wife did not inherit them. 

If, then. Dr. John Huddleson is right, Sarum forge antedates 1718. The 



94 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

name given to the forge is the old name of Salisbury, the capital of Wiltshire, 
England, from which county so many of our ancestors came. 

The first notice of the forge that I have found is in that record of things 
great and small that occurred in Dr. John Taylor's busy life, his memorandum 
book, and it is dated January 2.5, 1721. Its l)0giiuiing must date back of this 
time, of course, and if Dr. Huddleson is right, we may assume 1715 as its 
probable beginning. Just what it was at first does not appear. It may have 
been but a country blacksmith shop, as the work done at it was such as "A 
pair of old plov*' irons £0 16s. Od. ;" "A pair of shoes £0 6s. Od." 

John Taylor's interest in iron works on a larger scale probably originated 
in his intercourse with JSFutt and Branson, who were among the earliest iron 
workers of Pennsylvania. As early as 1720, and occasionally for some years 
after, he was engaged in making surveys of iron ore lands for these men about 
the forks of French creek, in Coventry township, in which locality Reading 
and Warwick furnaces were afterward located — Reading going into blast in 
1737, and Warwick a few years later — and from the numerous papers which 
refer to Nutt and Branson's affairs he evidently had an intimate connection 
with them. John Potts became connected with Nutt and Branson in 1736, 
and they and Taylor evidently thought out the plan by which the pig iron of 
Reading and W^arwick could be worked into bar iron, so utilizing Taylor's 
water powers on Chester creek. 

Acrelius says that Dr. John Taylor built Sarum forge in 1742. It must 
soon have gi-own to something more important than a blacksmith shoji, as 
July, 1742, John Taylor gives an order to his son Isaac, his storekeeper, 
to take "half a ton of pig iron" in trade from his sister, Mary Brogdon, so 
that at least by that time the forge must have been in operation, as pig iron 
would not be used in an ordinary blacksmith shop, and August 31, 1743, 
Obadiah Bonsall petitions the court for license ''to open an Inn at his house 
on the road leading from the French creek Iron Works to Thornbury forge, 
for the accommodation of the public, because there were many people resorting 
to and working at or near to the said forge." 

Cope in his history of Chester county says that horses were not shod till 
the middle of the eighteenth century, and Ashmead in his history of Delaware 
county says that as at that time not one horse in fifty was shod, and wagons 
were but little used, it could not be said that an ordinary blacksmith shop in 
a sparsely settled region could give employment to many persons. 

In 1743 the forge was apparently called ''Thornbury," the first use of the 
name "Sarum" appearing in the contract with Thomas Wills in 1745. 

The forge once established it appeared important to carry the manu- 
facture further than the production of bar iron, and a rolling and slitting mill 
was added in 1746, as is proved by the returns made in 1750 by John Owen, 
Sheriff. 

As the processes then used for the manufacture of iron are now obsolete, 
it may be well to pause for a moment to consider what they were. 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 95 

The forge establishment consisted essentially of a water power derived 
from the fall of Chester creek, which operated the hammer and also fnrnished 
by means of a bellows, made of two large cedar '"blowing tubs," bound with 
hoop iron, and furnished with valves made of wood and leather, the blast 
necessary to drive two open heating charcoal tires, one of which was called 
"the finery," and the other the "chafery," and a trip hammer. 

The work of the forge consisted in taking a portion of pig iron, of say 
a hundred weight, which after heating in the finery was drawna down under 
the hammer, the dross being thus worked out, and the iron formed into "a 
bloom," about four inches square and two feet long. By two or three alterna- 
tions of heating in the finery and hammering, an "ancony" was produced, 
which was a bar of the diameter desired, three feet long, with a roughly square 
head at each end. These heads were reheated in the chafery and rehammered 
iintil a round bar of the desired diameter was produced. 

The rolling and slitting mill, which was the first built in Pennsylvania, 
was for the purpose of reducing these bars into smaller iron, such as nail rods. 
The bars were broken into suitable lengths, heated and passed through grooved 
rollers, which reduced them in diameter, after which tliey were cut to lengths 
in the slitting mill. 

These operations represented in the middle of the eighteenth century the 
most advanced processes of iron making. They used no better methods in 
England, or on the continent of Europe, and his erection of such works proves 
that John Taylor was an enterprising man, and that he could command a 
capital which was considerable for that period. 

His method of working would not now be possible, for, not to speak of 
the crudeness of his mechanical contrivances, the assembling of his materials 
must have been very expensive. Charcoal he could get from his own forests, 
and June 20, 1746, we find him making a contract with Keese Jones to burn 
two hundred cords of wood in iliddletown, at lis. 8d. per hundred bushels, 
to be paid for "half money, half goods, as customary." 

His forge work was also done under contract, Thomas Wills, forgeman 
and finer, agreeing, January 18, 1745, to work in the forge two years in mak- 
ing "anconies" at 22s. 6d. per ton. But his raw material, pig iron, had to 
be brought from Reading Furnace in Coventry township, which was probably 
twenty-five miles distant, over roads built in 1727, that were hilly and other- 
wise atrocious, and his finished product, except such as had a local sale, had 
to be carried to Marcus Hook, on the Delaware, which was a journey of 
twelve miles. Peter Kalm, the Swedish naturalist, who visited Pennsylvania 
in the autumn of 1748, says of Chichester or IMarcus Hook, "They build here 
every year a number of small ships for sale, and from an iron work which lies 
higher up in the country they carry iron bars to this place and ship them." 
This iron work was Sarum Forge. 

Pig iron cost at Reading Furnace £7 per ton in 1750; £7 10s. in 1752, 
and £6 10s. in 1755. Bar iron, v.hich was Sarum's product, sold for £18 per 



96 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

ton ill 174(t, and for £-2i) ]ipi' ton in 1754. His tilt liaiiiiiur, which weighed 
10 cwt. 2 qrs., cost him, at £16 per ton, £8 8s. 

By the time he had fairly embarked iu the iron business, Taylor found that 
to build his works, and to carry them on with the long credits that had to be 
given in those days, would require additional capital, and he made a business 
connection with AVilliam Plumstead, who was flavor of Philadelphia in 1750 
and in 1754-5, and Registrar-General of the Province from 1745 to 1765. 
Plumstead furnished Taylor, at first, supplies, such as sugar, molasses, nam, 
osnaburgs (a coarse cloth used for workmen's clothing), etc., taking pay in 
casli, flour, etc., but later, advancing cash and receiving bars and other products 
of the iron works. 

The first note of these transactions is made June 12, 1741, and they con- 
tinued till 1753, when the account was closed. The first shipments of bar 
iron to Plumstead's order were made in 1740. On April 12, 174G, the advance 
amounted to £850 2s. lid., which sum was reduced by various payments, 
standing, November 16, 1751, at £671 18s. 2d.; and when a final settlement 
was made April 12, 1753, Taylor was in credit £381 6s. 2d., so that notwith- 
standing the great cost of manufacture, there was a profit in the iron business 
in the middle of the eighteenth century. The pounds were doubtless Penn- 
sylvania currency, worth $2.fi6|, and not pounds sterling. 

In 1754 ancj 1755 Taylor purchased pig iron from Col. Samuel Flower, 
then in charge of Heading Furnace, and in 1775 the then proprietors bought 
pig iron from Potts and Putter, who then owned Warw'ick Furnace. 

March 8, 1754, he bought of Joseph Wharton a lot of plates, "the new 
at 16 pounds per ton, the old at two-thirds the price, and all the remainder 
of the castings at five pounds per ton, to be paid in bar iron at twenty-six 
pounds per ton." These plates were, I suppose, to be worked over in his 
rolling mill, and the cast iron to be first treated at the forge. 

The supply of skilled labor was deficient in the country at that time, 
and after the expiration of the contract with Thomas Wills, as forgeman and 
finer, he contracted June 25, 1748, with Csesar Andrew, of Chester county, 
as hammerman for three years. He is to work the chafery and the hammer, 
and to receive fifteen shillings per ton for all the good and merchantable iron he 
may prodiice, besides six pounds per year for cutting hammers and anvils, and 
keeping the forge in order. His wages were to be increased to 17s. 6d. per ton, 
if he could so improve himself as to become a complete hammerman. In this 
contract John Taylor speaks of himself as "of Saraim Forge and Iron Works in 
the said county of Chester." Taylor complains in 1752 that he, Andrew, 
did not jjrove satisfactory, and had absconded, not having settled his accounts 
with him. "Ca?sar neglected my business, destroyed my hammer and gears, 
and wasted my aneonies and coals, so that, upon a moderate computation, I 
am damaged by his ill conduct above £100." He says that "the practice is 
to pay for drawing the aneonies, 35s. per ton, and 5s. per ton is allowed for 
coal. Each ton finer's weight is twenty-two hundred, which will yield twenty 



TI£K TAYLOR FAMILY. 97 

hundred bar iron, and what more the luunnicruian useth he always pays for, 
and this is the rule among all ironmasters who understand their business." 

Taylor brings suit against Andrew, and sends very shrewd instructions 
to his lawyers as to the points to be nuule against him in the Lancaster county 
court, but as Andrew ran away to Maryland, it is probable that "he had his 
ti'ouble for his pains," and got nothing more. 

Andrew had produced during his engagement 143 tons 19 cwt. 1 qr. 
18 lbs. of iron, at rates of pay varying from 15 shillings to 20 shillings per 
ton, but he drew money so liberally that, as Taylor makes up the account, 
Andrew remains £93 7s. lid. in his debt. 

Robert Moulder was at this time his factor at Marcus Hook. One of 
Taylor's letters to William Plumstead refers to this, and otherwise exempli- 
fies the business between them so well that I quote it here. The letter is evi- 
dently a copy and is unsigned. 

"Sir :— 

"I have sent you by Robert Moulder two tons one hundred of bar iron, 
be pleased to ship it for Boston and let the return be made in oil, loaf sugar 
and rum, or such other goods as you may think most suitable, if these can't 
be had, in this you will extremely oblige your 

"Assured friend and very humble servant." 
"April 11, 1751. 

"To Mr. Plumstead." 

To the manufacture of bar iron at the "Pennsylvania Slitting Mill," as it 
was called, was added the production of hoop iron, sheet iron, nail rods for 
horse shoes, and deck nails for ship building. Soon after the erection of the 
mill, his storekeeper, probably his son Isaac Taylor, on one of his periodical 
visits to England, after pricing nails in Liverpool, told the merchant with 
whom he was dealing that he could buy them cheaper at Taylor's mill in Penn- 
sylvania. This alarmed the English ironmasters, and led to a Parliamentary 
inquiry as to the condition of the iron manufacture in the colonies. Pending 
this inquiry, however, it is said that an order reached Pennsylvania, before 
Taylor's storekeeper returned, forbidding the erection of any more iron works. 

In due time, September 18, 1750, John Owen, Sheriil of Chester county, 
certified to James Hamilton, Lieutenant Governor, as the result of this inquiry, 
"That there is hut one mill or engine for slitting and rolling iron within the 
county aforesaid, which is situate in Thornbury township, and was erected 
in the year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Forty-six by John Taylor, the 
present proprietor." 

The order in regard to the erection of iron mills did not forbid the work- 
ing of those already in existence, and these works were kept in repair and in 
operation, though running sometimes at a loss until after the Revolution. 

Acrelius writing soon after John Taylor's death, of the iron industry 



98 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTEY. 

in T'onnsvlvania, says, "Sarum belongs to Taylor's heirs, has three stacks and 
is in full'blast." 

In addition to the forge and the rolling and slitting mill above spoken 
of, John Taylor had, on Chester creek, a grist mill and a saw mill, each, 
apparently, having its own dam for the creation of a water power, the several 
industries being extended along the creek for a distance of about a mile. The 
saw mill probably only produced' lumber for local consumption, but as John 
Taylor had flour for export, the grist mill evidently worked for a more exten- 
sive market. 

His factor, Robert Moulder, in 1755, besides advising him that the West 
Indies is a good market for his flour, beef and pork, tells him that he will do 
well to make a shipment of iron there, as the freight is but one pound per ton, 
and it will bring thirty pounds per ton there. 

There is a tradition in the family that John Taylor had blast furnaces 
also on Chester creek, and Acrelius in 1756 speaks of there being "three stacks 
in blast." It is certain that he was a large purchaser of pig iron, and while 
it may have been that he had one or more charcoal furnaces, which did not 
make enough iron to supply his forge, I think that as there is no mention 
of blast furnace operations among his accounts, and as I know of no iron 
mines in his neighborhood, the probability is that the report in regard to the 
blast furnaces is incorrect, and that Acrelius referred to heating furnaces 
connected with the forge. 

This sketch of John Taylor's industrial operations will show that with 
his iron works of various kinds, his grist mill, his saw mill, his store, which 
evidently gathered in the produce of a considerable section of country for 
shipment by way of Marcus Hook, and supplied the same section with grocer- 
ies, clothing and various imported articles in exchange, and his several farms 
in Chester and Delaware counties, his home farm alone containing twelve 
himdred acres, he was no inconsiderable personage as an employer of labor 
and a distributor of the products of labor. 

John Taylor died at the comparatively early age of fifty-nine. Like 
many another busy man, death came to him unawares, and he left no will. 
His wife, through her widow's life-interest in the estate, came into control 
of a large portion of his property, including in her possessions the plot of 
ground, thirty-four acres in extent, on which all his mills were located. 

After his death the widow leased for the term of her life, this plot, with 
all the works thereon, to Daniel Calvert, who had been six years before con- 
nected with the iron works, possibly as John Taylor's foreman. In 1760 the 
property seems to have been in the control of Jonathan Vaughan and Samuel 
Kennedy, who bound themselves October 4, 1760, to Dennis Whelen in the 
sum of £1000 to carry out a contract which they made on the same day for 
the purchase and management of Sarum forge, and March 21, 1770, Daniel 
Calvert leased to James Thomson, who had married, in 1768, John Taylor's 
granddaughter, Sarah, and to Pcrsifor Frazer, who had married, in 1766, his 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 99 

granddaughter, Mary, both wives being children of John Taylor, the younger, 
a two-thirds interest in the saw mill and grist mill, for the term of Elizabeth 
Taylor's natural life, they stipulating to pay a rental of twenty-three pounds, 
six shillings and eight pence, annually, therefor, and to keep the works in 
repair. This rental, which was at the rate of thirty-five pounds per annum, 
for the three-thirds interest, cannot have been a large rent, considering the 
cost of the manufacturing plant. 

The works were evidently somewhat out of repair — possibly through dis- 
use for a time — and Daniel Calvert agreed to put them "into reasonable and 
tenantable repair" at his own sole cost and charge. 

He also leased all of the works, including the grist and saw mills, to John 
Potts, of White Marsh township, Philadelphia county, reserving the rights 
of James Thomson and Persifor Frazer, under the agreement of March 24, 
1770, for the annual rental of seventy-six pounds, and May 21, 1771, Potts, 
Thomson and Frazer join their interests, agreeing to rebuild the slitting mill, 
and to carry on the biisiness. 

It is stated that John Taylor's son, John Taylor (XV 3), had operated 
the works after the death of his father, but the agreement imder which he 
had done this does not appear. He died in 1761, and apparently the iron 
works as well as the saw and grist mills, had had a period of idleness, though 
Sarum forge, in 1766 was operated by John Chamberlain. 

To complete the history of these several mills — Elizabeth Taylor prob- 
ably died in 1772, her will having been made on March 30 of that year, and in 
1775 the estate of John Taylor the younger was divided. 

Anthony Wayne, later known to fame as "Mad Anthony," who was then 
following his calling of civil engineer, made the surveys preparatory to the 
partition. In the partition deed made March 13, 1775, a tract containing 
one hundred and sixty-nine acres and thirty-four perches, "on which are erected 
an iron forge, slitting mill, gi-ist mill and saw mill, with other valuable 
improvements," was divided between John Potts and Ann, his wife, James 
Thomson, and Sarah, his wife, Persifor Frazer, and Mary, his wife, and 
Thomas Bull, of East Nantmeal, and Ann (Hunter), his wife. Potts received 
a tract of eight acres sitviated where Wilcox's Upper Glen Paper Mill now 
stands, with the saw mill, gi-ist mill and the seat for a slitting mill, and 
Thomson and Frazer received thirty-one acres and eighteen perches of land, 
with the forge thereon erected, the forge being where Wilcox's lower Glen 
Paper Mill now stands, and the mansion house which stood about whore the 
Wilcox mansion stands now. The slitting mill was out of repair, having prob- 
ably not been rebuilt, as proposed under the partnership of Potts, Thomson 
and Frazer in 1771, but Potts proposed now to rebuild it and obtained the 
necessary water rights for that purpose. Potts also received four and three- 
fourths acres lower down Chester creek, and above the forge lot. 

Thomas Bull and his wife received in the division one hundred and twen- 
ty-five acres, being the upper part of the tract. 



100 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

I suppose the reason of this division to be that in the confused state of 
affairs, after the death of the elder John Taylor, for there were several changes 
of management that are not noted here, the works had lieen run at a loss. 

John Potts was one of the owners of Warwick furnace, and Thomas Bull, 
bom 1744, afterward Lieut.-Col. Bull, of the Kevolution, was a manager of 
Warwick furnace. As this was one of the principal sources of supply of 
pig iron ior Sarum forge, I suppose that the forge owners got into debt to 
Potts and Bull, either for pig iron or for advances of money, and that the 
indebtedness was liquidated liy their taking a portion of the land and of the 
works. 

Persifor Frazer and his wife were interested in the operation of these 
works till after the Revolution, and Sarah Thomson had an interest in the 
forge as late as 1784, but the Taylor family ceased to have much to do with the 
industrial operations, and they gradually passed into other hands. There is 
no note of work done at the forge later than 1807. The grist mill, the saw 
mill and the slitting mill, which latter mill was re-built in 1779, were kept 
in operation until April 2, 1830, when the whole estate became the property 
of James M. Wilcox, who erected there the Glen Mills for the manufacture 
of paper, which manufacture has been continued ever since. In digging for 
the foundation of the lower one of these mills, the workmen unearthed one 
of the old anvils belonging to Sarum forge which stood upon that site. 

The records of John Taylor's surveyor's work are still more voluminous 
than those of his iron business, and are of themselves evidences of sutHcient 
activity to satisfy the desire of an ordinary man for employment. Hundreds 
of deeds, agreements and notes of surveys remain to attest these occupations. 
He was at first his father's deputy, and after his father's death succeeded him 
as Surveyor of Chester county, which then extended to the Susquehanna river. 
He was ordered to run the boundary, which set off Lancaster county in Feb- 
ruary, 1729, but he continued to act as surveyor for Lancaster county also. 
This district was fast settling up. Before the Proprietor could make deeds, 
the lands must be surveyed, his own manors, which were numerous, needed 
to be laid out, that his grants to settlers might not conflict with them, and 
many of the original surveys had been so carelessly or unskillfuUy made, the 
boundaries of each man's land generally enclosing a much larger acreage than 
he had paid for, that there was a constant demand for resurveys on the part 
of the Proprietor, who found himself defrauded of his revenues, so that the 
lot of the surveyor was not a happy one. 

There are numerous letters from James Logan, who, in one of them, 
signs himself "President of the Province," to John Taylor as Surveyor for 
Chester county. These all relate to land surveys. Logan made the sales and 
advised Taylor, who selected the lands and laid them out. These letters indi- 
cate a continuation of the close personal relations that had existed between 
James Logan and Jacolj and Isaac Taylor, and all went harmoniously as long 
as Logan was the active director. He practically leaned on John Taylor iu 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 101 

the management of the personal estate of the Proprietor, especially as to Fagg's 
Manor, the property of William Penn's daughter, Letitia Aubrey. He ap- 
points him, September 22, 1737, his attorney in his beiialf "to take the charge 
and management of her estate of Fagg's Manor, of which charge and manage- 
ment tb.ou art undoubtedly the most capable of any I know." lie comidains, 
however, to Taylor, January 24, 1738 — "the people who squatted on Fagg's 
Manor come to me constantly to settle their cora]ilaints, I knowing nothing of 
the merits. I leave them wholly to thee, and beg thee not to disappoint me, 
who am, as I have ever been, very sincerely, thy friend, 

"J. Logan." 

As James Logan advanced in years, and had many other duties, the corre- 
spondence with Taylor fell into the hands of James Steel, who had the man- 
agement of the land office. Either because Steel was naturally less genial or 
courteous than Logan, or because the Proprietor was pressing him hard to get 
his landed interests into better shape, and he had to pass the pressure on to 
Taylor, the relations soon began to be strained between them. 

The final breach, which was not far off, came in relation to the affairs of 
Spriugton Manor. This was a large body of lands which the Proprietor desired 
to reserve to himself, and he had directed, March 6, 1700, that "100,000 acres 
in one tract out of the nearest of land unsurveyed in the County of Chester 
should be erected into a manor, and called by the name of 'SpringtoAvn.' " 
Several attempts were made to locate it, and in John Taylor's memorandum 
book he notes, under date of Mai'ch 18, 1730 — "finished Spring-town Manor" — 
but in this, and in each other case, the location interfered with gi-ants previously 
made, and the lines were still unadjusted in 1740. 

A tract of land in what is now Wallace, Honeybrook and West Nantmcal 
townships was decided on, but the region was not easily accessible. John 
Taylor was very busy about other affairs, some of them the Proprietor's and 
some of them his ovm, and, though he had been urged to complete the work 
several times after 1730, it was still unfinished. 

The last two letters which are now known, though there were probably 
others intervening, are these : — 

"My Friend John Taylok : 

"Since I last parted with thee (which I think was at Chester) our 
Proprietor has frequently asked me if the manor of Spriugton was yet divided 
and the vacant lands in that neighborhood, Coventry and Nantmeal, viewed 
and described as was desired to be done by thee. To which I could only answer 
in the terms given by thee at Chester, viz. : That as soon as the weather was 
fit to go into the woods for that purpose, thou would, without further delay, 
finish that work, but not having heard anything since relating thereto, T now 
again request that if it be not already done, it may no longer be delayed. 

"Thy assured friend, 
"Philadelphia, 23d, 2d mo., 1740." ' "J. Steel. 

7 



102 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTEY. 

This was plain and urgent, but there must have been another still more 
peremptory, to which Taylor replied in a letter directed to the Proprietor — 

"May it Please Your IIoxoue— 

"Upon my return from the woods last night, I received James Steel's 
letter of the 6th instant, signifying that your Honour required me to bring 
you in a week's time a Draught of Springtown Manor with the divisions 
therein, as also Draughts of all your vacant lands in the Townships of Cov- 
entry and Nantmcll. 

"The last part of this demand is more than any one surveyor can comply 
with in a month's time, and is ten times as much as your Honour ever before 
gave me in charge, your directions being only for Draughts of Lands taken up 
by Nutt and Eranson, which were accordingly prepared. 

"But the danger of your displeasure in case of failure in any part as 
signified in James Steel's letter, instead of hurrying me on so vast a Task, has 
given me an entire discharge from all Diiidgery of the kind, and I have no 
more to do than to wish you a better surveyor than one who is notorious to 
have done more for your interest when your affairs seemed to have called for 
the strictest assiduity than any surveyor now living, and I can wish your 
Honour no greater felicity than to be as well pleased and easy as I am. 

"Your most humble servant, 

"Chester, May 12, 1740." "John Taylor. 

So it was evident that John Taylor had grown tired of bending his back 
and of taking peremptory commands, and there was a vacancy in the office of 
surveyor for Chester and Lancaster counties. 

He did important work in connection with the boundary line between 
Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland, which had been the subject of much 
correspondence, negotiation and litigation, which began in 1680 and lasted till 
Mason and Dixon ran their famous line in 1764-7. After much work and 
much controversy, in both of which John Taylor's father took part, but which 
reached no result, as is narrated in the sketch of Isaac Taylor, an agreement 
between the sons of William Penn and Charles, Lord Baltimore, the gi-eat- 
grandson of the original Proprietor of Maryland, wfis entered into on the 10th 
of May, 1732, and John Taylor was commissioned to trace on the ground the 
lines which were so glibly described on paper. 

Voluminous notes and drafts of depositions in regard to these surveys and 
drafts of the surveys themselves are in existence. They show that between 
December, 1732, and April. 1733, he had traced part of the circular line which 
forms the northern boundary of Delaware, and had made some other pre- 
paratory surveys. In September, 1733, he went to New Castle, Delaware, to 
wait upon the Commissioners for dividing the provinces, but nothing was 
accomplished at that meeting. 

In May, 1734, he went to Annapolis, and stayed there through the session 
of the Provincial Court. 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 103 

October 19, 1734, the Proprietors, John and Thomas Penn, direct Samuel 
Blunston, Esq., Clerk of our County of Lancaster, and John Taylor, Surveyor 
of the said county, to "go to the Susquehanna, on the west side of which you 
are, by the best methods you can, to find a station in the Parallel of Latitude 
that is fifteen miles south of the southernmost part of our City of Philadelphia, 
and from thence extend a line due west as far as the branch of Patowmack 
(Potomac), called Conegochega (Conococheague), and further, if when at that 
place you shall judge it necessary." 

This survey was ordered because it was reported that several persons 
claiming to hold grants from the Proprietor of Maryland had settled in Penn- 
sylvania territory. If they find any persons north of the line who claim under 
the Proprietaries of Pennsylvania, Blunston and Taylor are authorized to make 
terms with them and to give them warrants for proper amounts of land. 

If the settlers claim to hold lands under any other authority, means will 
be taken to remove them. 

It does not appear whether Samuel Blunston ever acted imder this au- 
thority, but in due time, September 9, 1735, John Taylor deposed that he 
found Thomas Cresap, John Hendricks and Joshua [Minshall living from two 
and one-half to six miles north of the boundary, though claiming to hold under 
the authority of the Proprietor of Maryland. 

He had run the line from the Susquehanna to the Conococheague in Octo- 
ber and November, 1734. In running previously the line east of the Susque- 
hanna he says that he came across the line called Lord Baltimore's line, which 
had been run 53 years before by Colonel Talbot and other persons appointed 
by Lord Baltimore, and that he had been familiar with that line for fifteen 
years. The maps accompanying these notes make the distance from Philadel- 
phia to the crossing of the Susquehanna 70 miles, and thence to Conogochega, 
90 miles. 

These surveys, which were not made with the concurrence of the Maryland 
authorities, settled nothing, and the controversy went on till both parties 
applied to the King's Council for an order which should solve the difiiculty. It 
was finally settled July 4, 1760, by an agreement between Frederick Lord 
Baltimore and the Penns, though the final s\irvey of the line was not finished 
till seven years later, when it was completed to a point two hundred and thirty 
miles from the northeastern corner of Maryland, at which point the siirveyors 
were stopped by the Indians, who could not be made to understand what right 
white men had to be planting jxjsts in territory which still belonged to them. 

As John Taylor left no will, Edward Brinton and John Hannum were 
appointed administrators to take charge of his property March 10, 175C, and 
May 3, 1758, were appointed full administrators. 

For an account of Mary Baker, the first wife of John Taylor (XIV 20), 
see Worrilow genealog;y'. 

Elizabeth Moore, his second wife, was born Elizabeth Jones. She mar- 
ried first John ^loore, Jr., of Birmingham township, wlio made his will 



101- THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTKr. 

October 8, 1733, proved January 7, 1734. His father, John Moore, of Thorn- 
bury township, made his will October 29, 1750, proved December 29, 1750. 
His Avife's name was Margaret. Elizabeth Taylor left no children. Her 
husband, John Taylor, was complained of in Chester Meeting December 2, 
1745, for administering oaths as a magistrate, and for publishing a scandalous 
paper about her. 

Isaac Taylor (XIII 6) took up 500 acres of land in East Bradford town- 
ship in the right of ten servants. He devised the northern half of this to his 
son, Jacob Taylor (XIV 21), who, on October 3, 1728, purchased the remaining 
half from his father's executors. This was on the east branch of the Brandy- 
wine and on Valley creek. Jacob seems to have lived there till 1735, when he 
sold the whole tract to his brother, John, and removed to Whiteland town- 
ship, a letter dismissing him and his wife being granted by Concord Meeting to 
Goshen Meeting June 4, 1739. He and his wife and a child died at nearly the 
same date, and letters of administration on his estate were granted to his 
brother, John Taylor, February 26, 174G. Jacob Taylor was a blacksmith. 

Ann Taylor (XIV 23). Her husband, Samuel Savage, Jr., was a son of 
Samuel Savage and Anna Rutter. Anna was a daughter of Thomas Rutter, 
of Germantown, who was one of the earliest iron masters of Pennsylvania. 
She was born October 25, 1686, and died August, 17C0. The elder Samuel 
Savage died in 1719. Samuel Savage, Jr., and his sister, Rebecca (N^utt), 
inherited from their father the French creek ore property, and Samuel also 
inherited an interest in Warwick furnace. His will is dated September 22, 
1741. Ann Taylor was disowned by the Friends for marriage by a priest 
December 3, 1733. No issue of this family was known in 1821. 

There is no record relating to Mary Taylor (XIV 24), except a letter 
from her brother, Dr. John Taylor, to his son and storekeeper, Isaac Taj'lor 
(XV 2), ilatid July 22, 1742: — "Let Sister Mary Brogdon have goods to tlie 
value of Three pounds five shillings, being for half a Ton of Pig Iron ;" and a 
paper dated November 8, 1732, in which she signs '"Mary Taylor," so that she 
Avas vmmarried at that time. She seems to have married Harry Young soon 
after, and was disovmed Jime 4, 1733, for marriage by a priest. Harry 
Young died intestate, and letters of administration were granted to Mary 
Young February 12, 1736. She probably soon after married Samuel Brogdon, 
of Chester to\\niship. Susanna Brog-don, who was probably their daughter, 
married Joshua Sharpless, who was born aboiit 1744, and settled in Providence 
tOAvnship. 



TUE TAYLOR FAMILY. 
GENERATION XV. 



105 



MEMBER OF FAMILY, 



BIRTH. 



MARBIAGE. 



EBSIDENCB. 



The Children of John Taylor (XIV 15) and Mary Bakeb. 



XV 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 


Martha Taylor. 
Isaac Taylor. 
John Tavlor. 
Pliilip Taylor. 
Jacob Taylor. 


William Enipson. 
Helena Stevenson. 
Sarah Worrall. 
Mary Riley. 


1710. 
1720. 
1721. 


Nov. 23, 1738. 

Jan., 1742. 

1744. 

Oct. 26, 1748. 


Nov., 174.^. 
1701. 
1754. 


Wilmington. Del. 
Chichester, Pa. 
Thornbury Twp, 
Thornbury Twp, 
Hrandywine 

Hundred. 


»> 


Mary Taylor. 








died young. 





The Children of Jacob Taylor (XIV 16) and Grace Worrilow. 



Israel Taylor. 
Isaac Taylor. 
Thomas Taylor. 

Jacob Taylor. 
Joseph Tiiylor. 
James Taylor. 
Hannah Taylor. 
Ann Taylor. 
JIary Taylor. 



Elizabeth Beaumont. 
Susanna Rowles. 
I. Eleanor McDever. 1 
II. Lydia Taylor. 
Edith Gnihb. 

Jane Bonsall. 

Joseph Robinet. 

McDever. 



about 1730. 



about 1745. 



Aug. 28. 1756. 

Oct. 6, 1701. 

I. 1764. 
II. 

Jan. 10. 1771. 

1773. 

Feb. 19, 1762. 
about 1764. 



before 1806. 
1740. 



The Children of Ann Taylor (XIV IS) and Samuel Savage, Jr. 



16 


Samuel Savage. 


never married. 


about 1734. 








17 


Ann Savage. 


Lewis Walker. 










18 


Martha Savage. 


Thomas Hockley. 










I'J 


Ruth Savage. 


James Hockley. 










20 


Mary Savage. 


William Crooks. 


about 1740. 









The biisl):ui(l of Martha Taylor (XV 1), William Empson, wa.s received 
into the Friends' Meeting October 3, 1738, as a preliminary to marriage, I 
snppose. They were married at Concord Meeting house. Martha Taylor's 
father, John Taylor, says he advanced to William Empson £217 7s. 7d., and 
to Martha Empson £16G 8s. 7d. 

Little is known of the history of Isaac Taylor (XV 2), who died in his 
early manhood. He is spoken of in an official document as "Merchant of Chi- 
chester." He was probably his father's factor at that place, otherwise called 
by its earlier name, "Marcus Hook." It was a ship])ing port, and a shipbuild- 
ing locality of some importance in the middle of the eighteenth century, and 
it was the point through wliich Dr. John Taylor's export and import trade 
passed. 



106 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

Isaac Taylor's wife, Helena Stevenson, was probably of New York, though 
Mrs. Morris (Frazcr XVII 8) thinks she was of Rhode Island. After her 
husband's death she declined to act as administratrix, and returned to her early 
home soon after. She had one child, who died young. 

Helena Stevenson was perhaps not a Friend. The marriage was held by 
Concord Meeting September 5, 1743, to be "not with regard to the rules estab- 
lished among us," and Isaac Taylor was further accused of "using some words 
and customs that is contrary to the rules established among us, as putting off 
his hat and bowing by way of compliment, and saying 'you' to a single person." 
As he declined to make satisfaction, they declared him to be "no member (in 
unity) of our religious Society until he shall make satisfaction," which he 
apparently never did. He admitted the charges November 7, 17-13, but was 
finally disowned. 

In 1741, the Grand Jury and some of the substantial citizens of Chester 
county having complained of the abiises practiced in that county by the use of 
defective weights and measures, the Justices petitioned the Governor for the 
appointment of a Regulator of Weights and Measures. "Standards of brass 
for weights and measures according to his Majesty's standards for the Ex- 
chequer" were purchased of Thomas Morgan for £7 12s. lid., and the 
Lieutenant-Governor having appointed Isaac Taylor as the Regulator, the 
standards were placed in his custody September 2, 1742. 

When he went to New York to be married he appointed his father, John 
Taylor, his deputy, so that he probably exercised the functions of his office 
before he received the brass standards. 

John Taylor (XV 3) was, at least in his later life, a man of wealth. 
Besides Sarum Iron Works, he owned a very large farm, but he was apparently 
a quiet man, being probably dwarfed by the activity and masterfulness of his 
father. 

He held no public positions, and there are but few remaining records of 
his life. His father claims to have advanced to him July 20, 1744, £215 13s. 
Id. His wife, Sarah Worrall, made acknowledgment to Chester Meeting for 
"marrying out" May 28, 1744. 

His marriage offended in some way the Society of Friends, and he was 
disowned by them in 1745, but as his family in the next generation were mem- 
bers in good standing, there was probably some way found for a reconciliation. 
Slany of the Friends were married at this time out of conformity to the rules 
of the Meeting, and a determined effort was made to stop the careless practice. 

His wife was a daughter of John Worrall. For her history, see Worrall 
genealogy. John Pierce was appointed administrator of John Taylor's estate 
August 14, 1762, and, as seems to have been the custom of the day, in due time 
married the widow. The marriage was not a happy one, and Mrs. Pierce took 
refuge, at least for a time, with her daughter, Mary Worrall Taylor (XVI 3) 
(Mrs. Colonel Frazer). Her health was poor in her later years. She died 
of apoplexy. 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 



107 



Philip Taylor (XV i) was apparently a farmer, living in Tliornbury 
township. He was Treasurer of Chester county in 1775. His father's account 
of advances to him foots up £1C2 7s. 3d., besides £114 15s. 2d. advanced 
between October 26, 1718, and Augiist, 1751. 

His wife, who died 1754, was a daughter of John Riley, Esq., and his 
wife Margaret, of Marcus Hook. Her brother, Richard Riley, born Marcus 
Hook, December 14, 1735, died August 27, 1820. He was an Associate 
Judge of Delaware county from 1791 to 1808 — a member of the Legislature 
in 1790 — an active patriot during the Revolutionary war, and an influential 
citizen throiighout his life. 

After Philip Taylor's death his widow, Mary, married December 26, 1755, 
Thomas Cheyney, born December 12, 1731, died January 12, 1811, son of 
John Cheyney, who married November 3, 1730, Ann Hickman, bom February 
14, 1713, daughter of Benjamin Hickman and Ann Buffington, of Westtown. 
This Thomas Cheyney was the 'Squire Cheyney who was an intimate friend 
of Colonel and Mrs. Frazer. His wife, Mary, died in 1766. 

Jacob Taylor (XV 5) left no children. 

Mary Taylor (XV 6) is said to have died at 16 or 17 years of age of fits, 
which were probably epileptic. 

The wife of Israel Taylor (XV 7) was a sister of William Beaumont. 
They bad several children, two of whom were Grace and William Taylor. 

Isaac Taylor (XV 8) also had several children, as had also bis brother 
Thomas. 

Thomas Taylor (XV 9). He was complained of December 7, 1764, for 
marriage by a priest. His acknowledgment was accepted. 

Jacob Taylor (XV 10). He was married at Concord Meeting. 

James Taylor (XV 12). His wife, Jane Bonsall, was of Birmingham 
township. 

Hannah Taylor (XV 13). She probably died with her mother about 
1746. All of the children of Jacob Taylor (XIV 21) and Grace Worrilow 
except Hannah returned from Whiteland to Thornbury or Concord. 

Samuel Savage (XV 16) inherited from his father, Saunicl Savage, Jr., 
who died in 1742, an interest in the French creek ore properties, and in War- 
wick furnace. He died intestate and childless, and his sister, to whom these 
interests passed, sold the property to Rutter and Potts, ironmasters. There 
were said, in 1824, to be no children, the issue of the marriage of Ann Taylor 
(XTV 23) and Samuel Savage, Jr. 



108 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 
GENERATION XVI. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BIETH. 



MABRIAQE. 



BESIDBNCB. 



The Children of Martha Taylor (XV 1) and William Empson. 



XVI 
1 



Mar.v Empson. 
Martha Empson. 



I. Jonathan Hulings. 
II. Robert Ta.vlor. 



Nov., 1739. 
Apr.. 1741. 



The Children of John Taylor (XV 3) and Sarah Worr.^ll. 



3 


Marv Wonall 


Persifor Frazer. 


Apr. 8, 174.5. 


Oct 


2, 1766. 


Nov. 30, 1830. 


Thombury, 


4 


Taylor. 












Chester Co. 




Isaac Taylor. 


Elizabeth Townsend. 


Oct. IS, 1747. 




17G7. 


about 1781. 


Thornbiiry. 

Chester Co. 


5 


Sarah Taylor. 


James Thomson. 


Jan. 2.5, 1751. 


Feb. 


28, 1708. 


Oct. 2, 1836. 


Aston, Chester Co. 



The Children op Philip Taylor (XV 4) and Mary Riley. 



John Taylor. 
Margaret Taylor. 



I. Elizabeth 

Moulder 
II. Susan Price. 
John Moulder. 



about 1750. 



178.5. 



The Children of Israel Taylor (XV 7) and Elizabeth Beaumont. 



Grace Taylor. 
William Ta.vlor. 





The Children of Thomas Taylor 


(XV 


8) and Eleanor McDever. 




10 


Isaac Tavlor. 














11 


Martlia Taylor. 














12 


Marv Tavlor. 














13 


Agnes (Nancy) 

Taylor. 














14 


Phoebe Taylor. 














15 


Joseph Taylor. 


Catharine Scrooss. 












16 


John Taylor. 















The Children of Thomas Taylor (XV 8) and Lydia Taylor. 



17 


Sarah Taylor. 




18 


Hannah Tavlor. 




19 


Rachel Tavlor. 




20 


Elizabeth Taylor. 




21 


Isaac Taylor. 


Marv Jackson. 


22 


Thomas Taylor. 





May 31, 1791. 



Sept. 18, 1793. 



I 



THE TAYLOU FAJIILY. 



109 



The first husband of ]\Iai-y EiiipsDii (XVI 1) was a merchant of Wilming- 
ton, Delaware. She had no children by her second husband. 

Martha Empson (XVI 2) was, in early life, engaged to be marricKl. Her 
betrothed died, and his death distressed her so much that slie expressed a wish 
that she might drop dead if she ever married any one. The time came when 
she changed her mind, and did marry. The curse she had invoked on her head 
fell — she did drop dead, and licr sjiirit was supposed to haunt the bouse where 
she died. 

Mrs. Morris told another version of this story. It states tliat on the 
night of the marriage of Mary Empson (XVI 1) her mother died suddenly, 
having an apoplectic seizure, which ended her life the next moming. She 
haunted the house in which she died. The daughter was very gay, though of 
Quaker origin, Aveariug a scarlet riding habit trimmed with gold lace. 

Mary Worrall Taylor (XVI 3) exhibited during her life the most marked 
character of any woman among my ancestry, partly because of her strength 
and the sweetness with which she was endowed by nature, and partly because 
she was placed during a critical ]ieriod of her life — the Eevolutiouary war — 
in circumstances in which she had to guide the business of her own estate, as 
well as to take some part in public affairs. 

It is through her that a large part of the traditional lore of the family 
has been preserved. She outlived her husband nearly forty years, and during 
most of that time her home in Thornbury was the gathering place of her chil- 
dren and grandchildren, who learned much of the past family history from 
her, and who, without exception, conceived the highest admiration tor her 
abilities, for the excellence of her character, and her charm. 

The grandchildren have now all passed away, my Aunr Khoda Wright 
Smith, who died in June, 1903, in her eighty-sixth year, being the last survivor 
of the band which once was fifty in number. 

She was her father's principal heir, her only brother dying in early 
middle age after removing his family to Xorth Carolina, and as their mother, 
Sarah Worrall Taylor, outlived him for ten years, she inherited largely from 
her also. 

She spent almost all her life on her farm in Thornbury township, leaving 
it only a short time before her death, to make her home with her daughter, 
]\Iary, wife of Joseph Smith. 

She married at the age of twenty-one; children came into the family as 
rapidly as they ordinarily did in those early wholesome days, and her life for 
the first ten years after her marriage was doubtless the ordinary life of a pros- 
])erous matron of the time, except that her husband's business interests and 
his absorption in public affairs took him a good deal from home, and left the 
management of the estate somewhat in her hands. His public duties became 
more absorbing in the year 1775, and after January, 1770, his seiwice with the 



110 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

army laid the care of the farms and of the Sarum Iron Works very largely 
upon her shoulders. 

A number of the letters that passed between her husband on one side, and 
herself and some of the members of his family and his neighbors on the other 
side, have been presented, and well illustrate what has been said above of her 
character. They show great affection between them, and on her part the feel- 
ing that life in her husband's absence had lost its charm, but they also show 
that she is vigorously attending to her duties of supervision over her domestic 
and her business affairs. 

In her first letter, written August 25, 1776, to "Captain Persifor Frazer, 
at Ticonderoga, IST. Y.," she says — "May you still enjoy that greatest of bless- 
ings" (his health), "and return to me, who cannot regard life without you." 

She adds, "I often paint to myself your coming, and your little babes all 
around you," and with a beautiful woman's desire to remain beautiful in her 
husband's eyes, she continues, "and your surprise at seeing your Polly turned 
into a yellow Dutch-looking woman." 

Fortunately, the sim and the wind, which she encountered in her care of 
the estate, wrought no such havoc in her appearance as she feared, as we shall 
see a little later. 

His sister, Ann Frazer, writes him August 21, 1776 — "Your wife drives 
your business on extremely well, I assure you. It would please you very much 
to see what pretty order she has everything in." And she writes again, October 
8, 1776 — "It must give you the greatest satisfaction to hear that no person ever 
behaved in a more prudent, prettier manner than your wife doth. I assure 
you she is admired by every one in the neighborhood, for her good conduct and 
excellent management." 

And his old friend, the sterling patriot farmer, Thomas Che_\^ley, tells 
him October 15, 1776 — "Your wife, I do assui-e you, has managed your busi- 
ness to admiration. She has the new land cleared completely, twice ploughed, 
and sown in good time. She turns out a very good farmer. I believe the 
buffet must be neglected, for the farming seems to engage all her attention." 

The wife writes October 20, 1776, while he is still in the wilds about 
Saratoga with the rigors of a northern winter in near prospect — "I can scarcely 
bear to think that you are now so uncertain of coming home, when you gave 
me so much hope in your letter by Colonel Hausegger. If you cannot come 
this winter, pray let me know for certain, and give me leave to come to you, 
and you shall see that neither mountains nor lakes, frost nor snow, shall Ije 
able to keep from me the delight of seeing you. 

"Your being promoted, I fear" (will delay your return); "if so, I could 
wish it otherwise, my love outbalances my pride." 

But at the time when she thus expresses her pain at separation, she is 
evidently diligent in her business. She writes him October 2 — "I have spent 
the greater part of the day in the new land." And, October 15 — "I have got 
the new land sown, and have done all but a little rve that we shall finish this 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 



Ill 



week. The neighbors have been very good. They brought their ploughs and 
helped me. Your old friend Cheyney brought his negro, and stayed and sowed 
all the field." 

Many of her letters tell of the provision she is making to replenish his 
wardrobe, going frequently to Philadelphia to get articles to send to him in 
camp. In July, 1777, he is with the army in New Jersey. Being a con- 
noisseur in horses, she writes him July 6th of "a very gay horse about four 
years old that she is trying to buy for him." July 9th she writes — "I reaped 
the new-land wheat yesterday, and part of the rye, with 26 hands. Every man 
tried who could do the best for you. There were both Whig and Tory in the 
field, and not the least dispute among them." 

Soon after this Major Frazer was stationed nearer home, about the time 
of the Battle of Brandywine, September 11, 1777, and afterward for six months 
he was a prisoner in Philadelphia, so that there is a gap in the correspondence 
until 1778. 

About October 1, 1778 — the letter has several dates, he being then with 
the army in New Jersey — his wife writes him, as she so often does, first about 
the comforts she is about sending him in the way of suitable clothing. She 
has been ill with fever, and the little children have been sick, and life seems 
hard to her. 

";My dearest Percy, I little thought that ever such a dreadful separation 
would fall to our lot. O ! this unhappy war, that has made life almost unsup- 
portable to me! If it was not for the pleasing thought of seeing you some 
time, and in that how often am I disappointed!" 

But all the while, though her woman's heart must now and then have its 
word, her care for him, and her sympathetic interest in seeing that he has all 
obtainable comforts, and her humorous narration of the little incidents in the 
life of their children, show that she is by no means always dwelling on her own 
deprivations ; and she tells him of the little ones going to school, Mary Anne 
amone thorn, who at tlie mature age of two is coming on nicely with hrr letters, 
of their childish ailments and recoveries, and of the news and gossip of the 
neighborhood. 

Another side of her character appears in her relation to the stirring public 
events of her life. 

Her daughter, Sarah Frazer (XVII 1), writing in 1840, says that she 
was at school with her younger brother and sister on the morning of the Battle 
of Brandywine, when her teacher, coming into the school house about 9 or 10 
o'clock, after listening intently outside for some minutes, said — "There is a 
battle not far off, children, you may go home." "As we returned, we met our 
mother on horseback, going over to the place of action, knowing that her hus- 
band and our father nuist be in the affray. She rode first to the house of John 
Pierce, her stepfather, who lived about half-way between our house and Chads- 
ford. Where else she went I do not know, but she was riding all day. She 
came home once, but was off again until dark." 



112 THE SMITH COLLATEUAL ANCESTRY. 

She, herself, gave this accoivut of the pillage of her house to her gi'and- 
daiighter, Elizabeth Wright Smith (Smith XVIII 62), Aiigiist 17, 1822, who 
wrote it down immediately afterward. I follow her manuscript closely, but 
have made a few verlial changes : 

The next day after the battle, a party of (American) Riflemen came, and 
as there was the baggage of ten Regiments in the house (there had been a good 
deal of ammunition and some arms which had been removed long before this 
time), they advised Col. Frazer to go away, for if the British got wind of the 
baggage and ammunition being stored there, they would probably come to 
plunder the house, and he would be taken prisoner. He, however, did not 
think there was any danger. The Riflemen, after taking some refreshment, 
went away. Early on Saturday, your gi'andfather rode on to the Blue Ball, 
on the Chester road, two or three miles from home, to join a reconnoitcring 
party, upon which he had been ordered. * * * * 

I had four children — Sally, Mary Anne, Robert and Persifor. Aunt 
Nancy Frazer lived with me at that time, and Polly Follows, a woman whom 
I had brought up from childhood, black Rachel. These, with two black men 
who worked on the farm, and who belonged to us, made up my family. I had 
been afraid of the British coming to the house, and had sent many things of 
value to neighbor Hemjihill's. Your grandfather's papers, and £200 in pa]ier 
money, some gilver and other things, I liad hid in the garden, and in some 
bushes in the woods. In the morning, after Col. Frazer had gone away, as 
I sat by the open door carding and spinning wool, we heard wagons coming 
along the road over yonder hill; it was covered with woods, and we could not 
see the top of it as we do now. I thought they might be American wagons, 
coming here to take away the baggage of the regiments. 

Major Christy (who, being disabled by a sprained ankle, was nursing it 
THuler Airs. Frazer's care) waited for them to come out of the woods, and see- 
ing the drivers wearing riflemen's shirts, still thoiight they were our own 
people. As they came nearer he discovered them to be British just in time 
to give the alarm, to send one of the black boys to Uncle Jacob Vernon's, and 
to escape with the children, Aunt Nancy Frazer and Polly Follows to the woods 
back of the house, where they hid behind some large boulders of rock and 
among the branches of a large tree that had been felled. The other boy was 
sent for the party of riflemen who had been at the place the night before, but 
who had unfortunately gone away early in the morning. 

All had now left the hoxise but myself and black Rachel. She took two 
large cheeses and threw them over the fence among some weeds and briers. 

I sat carding my rolls to pieces, when a British ofiicer, though not the 
commander of the party, entering, accosted me in broad Scotch with, "Where 
are the damned rebels V In those days, when I was frightened, I always 
became angry. I have often thought since I did wrong to exasperate him; 
however, I always did say everything against them I could. So I said to the 
officer — "I know of no rebels ; there is not, I believe, a Scotchman about the 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 



113 



place." He flew into a great rage (the Scotch officers being sensitive about 
alhisions to their own rebellion in 1745), and used very abusive language. By 
this time mauy of the soldiers were in the house, and were ransacking the lower 
part of it. Some had gone into the cellar, and had brought up a barrel of salt. 
It was very scarce and very valuable, and both armies were much iu need of it. 
He thought he had brought all there was, but he missed a bushel that was 
hidden in a barrel under some beer bottles. Some of the salt they tied up in 
bags and put in their jiockets, and they gave a great deal to their horses. The 
commander of the party, which consisted of two hundred foot and fifty horse- 
men, now came up. He divided the horse into two companies, stationing them 
at a considerable distance from the house, but so as to surround it completely. 
They were afraid that the riflemen, who they had heard were in the neighbor- 
hood, shoidd surprise them. 

They had seen Major Christy go into the woods as they came up the hill, 
they knew the American uniform he wore, and thought he might be one of the 
party of riflemen, and that the rest were not far off. This did not tend to 
lessen their fears. They had also a line of sentinels placed within their line 
of horse. 

The alarm that had been given by the black boy brought many of my 
friends and neighbors to the spot. When I saw them standing about with my 
own servants, for the other black men had joined them, I thought it was the 
hardest thing that not one of them came near to say a single word to me in 
my great difficulty and distress, for I did not then know what prevented them. 

After these arrangements had been completed. Captain De West, who was 
Captain of the Guard, and ranked equal to a Colonel, came iuto the house just 
as one of the men was going to strike me. They had got at the liquor and were 
drunk. The officers were obliged to drive them off with their swords. 

However, as I said, the Captain came in, and told me that he had heard 
that the house was full of arms and ammunition, and asked me to open the 
door at the foot of the stairs. He was afraid that some one was concealed on 
the stair case who would shoot him. I told him I knew of no ammunition in 
the house, and that I would not open the door ; if he wanted it opened he could 
do it himself. He then opened the case of the clock, hoping to find money. 
He found an old musket with the lock broken off. This he jammed up into 
the works of the clock and broke them. He again insisted on my opening the 
stair-foot door, but I persisted in refusing to do so, and he was obliged to open 
it himself. 

He then told me to show him wliat property belonged to me, promising 
that none of it should be touched. This I did, yet he went to your grandfather's 
desk, and took out and carried off his flute, his music books, and a large French 
Bible, beside many other French books. 

He took a heavy silver-handled riding whip of mine, which had belonged 
to my Grandmother Taylor, saying: "I am just in want of a riding whip." 
T took it out of his hand, and told him that it was an old family piece, and I 



114 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

<lid not want. to part with it. He could take it from me if he chose. Screwing 
oif the head, I put it in my pocket, and handed him the whip. He looked 
very queerly, but did not take it. 

When he saw the baggage which was packed in chests, and ammunition 
boxes, he said, "you told me that there was no ammunition here," and breaking 
them open found the clothes of the soldiers. Then came a scene of pillage and 
confusion. They plundered the house, and what they could not carry away 
they destroyed, took the beautiful swords worn by the officers on parade, and 
carried off the clothes. One man put on five shirts. While tearing about up 
stairs, they took a suit of plaid worsted curtains belonging to a field bedstead 
that I had, and throwing part of it at poor Rachel, said, "here, nigger, is 
something for a petticoat." The poor creature being frightened nearly to death, 
thought she must try to put it on. In attempting to do so, she put her head 
through a slit and became completely entangled, to their great amusement. 

They went to the barn and took fifty bushels of wheat that was threshed 
and in bags, and a great deal that was in the sheaf. That in bags they took 
away, the sheaves they gave to their horses. The next spring the gi-ain came 
up thickly on the bank in front of the house where they had strewed it for horse 
feed. 

All our horses were taken away. In order to catch a young mare that 
had not been broken, they turned her into the garden. She ran among the 
vines where I had put my papers, and I felt sure that they were gone, but the 
Eritish did not find them. After they departed, I found them strewed many 
yards from the place where I had hid them. 

After doing all the mischief they dared, and taking away all they could 
carry, they went off, except a few that stayed for I forget what. The Captain 
as he was going, said to me : "I had orders to take Mr. Frazer prisoner, and 
burn the house and barn to the ground, bi;t I give them to you." I said, "I 
cannot thank you, sir, for what is my own, and if your orders were such, you 
would not dare to disobey them." 

After he had gone out a soldier came do\vu stairs with a vei-y handsome 
double reined bridle of mine. I told him to put it do^vn; the Captain had 
said that they should touch nothing belonging to me; and as it was made for a 
lady it would be of no use to him, and he should not have it. He very 
peaceably put it down, went into the dressing room, and took from a dressing 
table that stood under the glass a dressing box, the contents of which, pin- 
cushions, combs, brushes, and many other things, he threw on the floor, and was 
M'alking off with the box. I told him to put it back in its place, and that if he 
offered to take it, I would call the Captain, who was not out of sight or hearing. 
He went straight back, picked up and replaced all he had turned out, and went 
away. The box was preserved and still remains a silent witness of the scene. 

I was very sorry to part with two little glass cream buckets with ladles — 
the most beautiful little things — I never saw any like them. They wer& 
brought from England by my Grandmother Taylor. 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 115 

They took a large quantity of liquor that was stored away, some of it 
belonging to us, and some to Aunt Sally Thomson. 

After all had gone, those of my family who had been hid in the woods 
came home, very hungry, and there was not a morsel to give them, except a 
piece of meat that had been put over to boil for dinner, with a few ears of corn, 
and the cheeses Rachel had thrown into the briers. This was on the 13th 
of September, 1777." 

Her daughter, ]\lra. Morris, said that on this same day Captain De West 
said to her mother that there were persons employed by his Government to 
offer very high terms to the American officers to induce them to join the British 
army, when they would receive a commission, the past would be overlooked, 
and a reward given them besides. Her husband, he said, was one of the officers 
designated, and her influence over him was doubtless great, and if it were ex- 
erted for this purpose he probably would accept the offer. Such a change of 
position would be greatly for her happiness and advantage. Her mother's reply 
was : "You do not know Col. Frazer, or you would not undertake such a thing, 
nor would he listen to me were I to propose it ; but if it were possible, and he 
M'ere persuaded to become a traitor to his country, I should never consent to 
have anything more to do with him." 

Nearly forty years after this phmdering expedition a crow which was a 
pet in Mrs. Frazer's household snatched up a gold sleeve button from the bank 
before the house. One of the servants coming up from the spring-house saw 
the crow's action, and securing the bird took the button to Mrs. Frazer, who 
recognized it as one of a pair which she had hidden in the garden just before 
the raid. 

On account of this plunder, Col. Frazer, when estimates of depredations 
of the British Army were called for by the Pennsylvania Legislature in 1782, 
put in a claim for £287 5s. The great loss of clothing was, of course, not his, 
but the loss of the army who had their baggage there. 

Col. Frazer was taken prisoner while on the reconnaissance of which his 
wife spoke in her narrative above quoted, and remained in Philadelphia about 
six months when he escaped from durance, his Irish guards having celebrated 
St. Patrick's day so vigorously as to cause a relaxation of their vigilance. 

During the period of his imprisonment, his wife, who had a pass from 
General Washington, which was honored by the British authorities so far as 
to allow her to enter Philadelphia, went several times to the city to see her 
husband. She and her neighbor, Mrs. Gibbons, who had a brother. Col. Han- 
num, who was a fellow prisoner with Col. Frazer, took to the house of Mrs. 
Jenkins, the proprietor of the "Conestoga Wagon" tavern, on the south side of 
Market street above Fourth street, siich provision as the farms in Thornbury 
afforded, and ilrs. Jenkins, wlio was at heart a good Whig, supplied the prison- 
ers from time to time with very welcome additions to their bill of fare. Mrs. 
Frazer's daughter, Sarah, accompanied her mother on one of these journeys, 
and thus relates her experience : 



116 THE SSLITII COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

"My mother was going to the city, and the provision was upon two horses, 
one of which I was to ride. I was not nine years old, but was a good horse- 
woman. Everything — flour, meat, chickens, eggs, butter, cheese and fruit was 
packed in saddle bags, and in large, strong lionu-niade tow-linen wallets, which 
were laid across the saddle, the ends projecting far on each side of the horse. 
I rode a large black horse, and you may think I looked pretty queer mounted 
thus above all the baggage. It was a warm day, and though we left our home 
in Thornbury before noon, and our horses were large, strong, and good travel- 
ei's, yet with their heavy loads and the heat it was nearly dark before we began 
to descend the hill to Darby. Here we were met by an American officer on 
horseback, who said he would not suffer any one to proceed, accusing my mother 
of taking supplies in to the city for the British, at the same time making com- 
plimentary speeches to her about her beauty. She was then the handsomest 
woman I have ever seen. She rebuked him for his impertinence, which she 
told him was unworthy the uniform he wore. She insisted on being allowed 
to pass, and attempted to do so. As he caught the bridle rein to prevent it, 
she cut her horse with her whip, causing him to jump, Avhen she freed her rein, 
and again tried to pass on, but finding him determined to detain her, she pro- 
duced her i^ass, after reading which he asked her pardon, seemed miich morti- 
fied, and rode off very fast. We never knew who he was. 

"After leaving Darby we soon entered the thick woods which then extended 
from the river westward for several miles, and eastward nearly to the corner 
of Sixth and Walnut streets, where the new jail stood. We now began to 
meet companies of Hessian soldiers, commanded by their ofScers, employed in 
cutting wood to supply the city with fuel. We had not gone far before day- 
light left us. The light from the torches which the Hessians carried (they 
wei-e frightful looking creatures), and that gleaming from the lamps in their 
hats, seen away off through the stems of the trees, made the surrounding df.rk- 
ness seem deeper. I shall never forget the impression the scene made upon me. 

"My mother did not seem afraid. She said that the British were always 
glad to see provisions enter the city; that if any one troubled us we should be 
protected by the sentinels stationed along the road. I thought some of the men 
we met looked fiercely and wickedly at \is. 

"We crossed the river at Gray's Ferry on a floating bridge. We had not 
been spoken to till we came there. The sentinels at each end of the bridge 
questioned my mother, and then we passed on to our resting place at Mrs. 
•tonkins', who at once set herself about procuring a iiermit from General Howe 
for my mother to see her husband in the prison. This was no easy matter, and 
the delay caused by this difficulty kept us in Philadeliihia till late on the second 
day after our arrival. It was at last obtained through an acquaintance of Mrs. 
Jenkins' fan American lady who was intimate with General Howe), under a 
promise that her name should not ajipear, and my mother never knew who 
did her this great kindness. 

"The mornins' after we came, she was too much worn out to rise early 



THE TAYLOK FAMILY. 117 

(it was some time before the birth of the Patty who died). Anxiety on my 
father's acoimiit, the uncertainty of her being permitted to see liini, the fatigue 
of preparing to leave home, and the ride in the heat, and in the night, had 
been too mnch for her. I was np pretty early, and looking out of the window, 
I saw far dowix the street a large body of IJritish soldiers on jiarade. The sun 
which was jnst rising shone upon their arms and bright uniforms. The sight 
was a very brilliant one, but I hated them so much, and was so indignant that 
they should possess Philadel])hia, and have my father in prison, that I cried, 
screamed, and stamped with all my might just with rage. 

"After breakfast I went with ]\Irs. Jenkins to see my father, who ^vag 
confined in the State House, now Independence Hall. Across the wide hall 
that ran through the house from front to rear, about midway, was a heavy iron 
grating, reaching from floor to ceiling. Back of the grating was a close screen 
which did not reach the floor. In the back part of the hall the ])risoners were 
allowed to walk for air and exercise, both front and back doors Jicing opened, 
and guards being placed at each door. Several gentlemen were walking back- 
ward and forward behind tlie screen. As we entered the hall I instantly 
distinguished my father's feet and legs, and cried out: 'O! I see my daddy's 
legs, I see my daddy's legs,' and jumped up and down for joy at the sight. 
Mrs. Jenkins and the peo]ile about thought I had gone crazy. The screen was 
soon removed and I saw and talked with my father through the grating." 

Mrs. Frazer further said: "From neglect, bad food and cold, the suffer- 
ings of the American prisoners during the winter the British held Philadelphia 
were very severe. On one occasion Mrs. Gibbons and I went to the city 
together; she to visit her brother. Col. Hannum, and I to see my husband. 
When I saw him, he asked me if I could take to General Washington a paper 
addressed to him, describing their situation, and signed by the prisoners (both 
officers and men, I think) ; and also some of the worm eaten bread on which 
they were fed; which they wished should be shown to General Washington, 
who was then with the army at White ]\Iarsh. This I undertook to do. 

"In the morning of October 10, after I had seen Col. Frazer and received 
his commissions, Mrs. Gibbons and I mounted our horses and turned their heads 
homeward. At the ferry over the Schuylkill river there were persons whose 
business it was to search all who came from the city. IMrs. Gibbons and I 
were taken into a room, and two women came forward to undress us. Mrs. 
Gibbons declared that they should not touch her, and made so miieh resistance, 
kicking, slapping and scolding, that they were sure she had something to 
struggle for and undressed her entirely, even taking off her shoes and stockings. 
I had ripped the quilting of my skirt, and put the papers between the lining 
and the outside, sewing them in. 0])ening the hem also I put the pieces of 
bread all around the bottom of the skirt, and sewed them in. I did not feel 
at all comfortable at the prospect of being searched. Tii'ed out with the trouble 
they had taken for nothing, the searchers came to me, who had ke])t very still, 
8 



118 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

and saying, 'This one has nothing worth looking for, or she would not be so 
quiet,' scarcely examined anything about me. 

"After searching our saddles we were allowed to go on our way. Though 
I had preserved my composure, I was far from feeling unconcerned. I thought 
of my little children at home, without father or mother should I be detained, 
of the business at home without anyone to attend to it,, what would become of 
our living? But, most of all, I thought of the poor prisoners. If their efForts 
to obtain relief should be discovered and frustrated, not only would nothing 
be done to lessen the rigor of their sufferings, but the severity of their con- 
finement would no doubt^be increased. I took a very long breath when we were 
safely over the river. It was afternoon when I got home. I took something to 
eat, changed my dress, had my saddle put on a fresh horse, and set out for 
White Marsh. It rained hard during the afternoon, and when I came to the 
Swede's ford, where I crossed the Schuylkill, it was quite dark. There was a 
large house, a tavern or ferry house there, and I rode up to it, intending to ask 
for some one to giiide me to the crossing. As light came from all the windows, 
the place being full of soldiers, drinking, swearing and carousing, I hesitated, 
fearing to call, and rode down to the ford. But I was afraid to attempt crossing 
in the dark a ford I was not used to, and after sitting on my horse at the bank 
for a while, I determined to return to the house. I found that the soldiers 
were some of our own, and seeing a man at the door, I asked him to request 
the officer commanding the party to come to me. He did so, and when the 
officer came, he proved to be a gentleman I knew. He had his horse saddled, 
and crossed the river with me, keeping hold of my rein. The river was rising 
and the current was very strong, the water coming above my saddle girths. 

"I saw General Washington next morning at headquarters— General 
La Fayette, and some other officers were with him. When I was introduced 
I gave him the papers and the bread. The statement of the suffering condition 
of the prisoners moved him very much. He asked me some questions relating 
to the business, and I came away. He sent a gentleman with me who saw me 
safely across the river. 

"General Washington immediately communicated with General Howe 
respecting the treatment of the American prisoners in Philadelphia, and their 
condition was somewhat improved, though they were never treated as they 
should have been." 

Mrs. Frazer's grand-daughter, Elizabeth W. Smith, quoted her grand- 
mother as saying that during the severe winter of 1777, when the American 
army lay at Valley Forge, suffering for all the necessaries of life, she rode day 
after day collecting from neighbors and friends, far and near, whatever they 
could spare for the comfort of the destitute soldiers. The blankets, half-worn 
clothing and yarn thus obtained, she brought to her own house, where the 
blankets and clothing received the repairs necessary to make them fit for wear, 
stockings were newly footed, and new ones knitted, and to those she had col- 
lected, she added what clothing her own family could spare. 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 11!> 

She often sat up most of the night, and sometimes the whole night to get 
the clothing ready. Witlx these supplies, and what she could obtain of food, 
packed on her horse, she would set out on her cold and lonely journey of fifteen 
miles to tlie camp. She made this journey repeatedly through the winter, and 
took to the soldiers at Valley Forge more than three hundred pairs of stockings, 
besides a gi'eat deal of clothing and food. She said that she could trace the 
way taken by the foraging parties fi'om the camp by the marks of their bleeding 
feet upon the snow. 

All the clotli and linen worn by Col. Frazer during the war was sjnin at 
home, most of it by his wife's own hands. All the clothing of lier family during 
this time was made at home, the weaving only being done elsewhere. All the 
business of every kind she had the oversight of — the farm, the Sarum Iron 
Works, and her domestic matters. In summer, as soon as it was daylight, she 
would have her horse saddled, and would ride over the farm giving directions 
to the workmen, frequently going also down to Chester creek to the iron works, 
and would return home by breakfast time, to give the needed care to her 
children, her servants and her household affairs. 

When General La Fayette visited America, in 1824, Mrs. Frazer was at 
the house of her daughter, Mary Anne (Mrs. Jonathan Smith), in Walnut 
street above Fifth street, where the office of the Pennsylvania Fire Insurance 
Company now stands. On the day La Fayette visited Independence Hall, Mr. 
Smith told Mr. Biddle, one of the committee in attendance upon the General, 
that it would gratify Mrs. Col. Frazer very much if she could see La Fayette. 
He at once consented to call. She told liim that she had seen him once under 
very different circumstances, and mentioned her visit to the camp at ^^^lite 
Marsh, in October, 1777. He recollected the scene perfectly, and seemed much 
gratified to have it recalled, and to see again her who had taken so important 
a part in it. She ever after expressed the gi-eatest gTatification and pleas\ire 
in recalling this interview, though at the time the recollection had moved her 
to tears. 

Mrs. Frazer had inherited a handsome estate from her father, but during 
the war several of the farm.s were sold to supply means to carry on her charities, 
to keep her husband supplied, and to support her large family at home, so that 
at her husband's death, in 1792, her estate had greatly dwindled, though 
enough- remained for- her comfortable maintenance. 

After she became a widow, her hand was sought in marriage by Caleb 
Brinton, one of the wealthiest men in that part of Chester county, but she 
declined to marry again. 

She carried on her farm till alwut 1820, her sister, Sarah Thomson, living 
with her in her later years. 

All of her large family of children and gTand-children found at her home 
in Thornbury, whicli was tlieir frequent rendezvous, the deliglit that comes 
from love and sympathy, and to the end of their lives no one ever heard any 
of thcju speak but in praise and admiration of their "Grandma Frazf^r." 



120 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

It was while she still lived in Thornhury that her grand-ilaiig'hter, Eliza- 
beth W. Smith, induced her to narrate the events of her early life, which have 
been so largely drawn on in this narrative. They were told and recorded 
eighty-six years ago. 

To the invitation of her daughter, Mary Anne Smith, that she should 
make her home with her in Philadelphia, she replied that "she would die in a 
year if she had to go up stairs, and could not at any time step out of the 
house on to the ground to take the air." After her daughter Mary (Mrs. 
Joseph Smith) removed to East Whiteland, Chester county, she decided to 
make her home with her, but upon Mr. Smith coming to Thornhury with a 
gig to remove her to his house, a distance of ten miles, she told him that a gig 
tired her too much, and she mounted her horse and went over on horseback. 

She had been a (Quaker in her early life, bvit as she married "out of 
ileeting," her husband being an elder in the Middletown Presbyterian church, 
a deputation of elderly female Friends called upon her to announce her exclu- 
sion from their society for this oifence. To their appeal to her that they might 
carry back the statement that she said she was sorry, she replied : "I can say 
with sincerity that I am sorry that Friends were offended, but no one shall ever 
say that I admitted that I was sorry I married Persifor Frazer." Her husband 
was exceedingly polite to the visitors, and entertained them so handsomely, and 
he also regretted so much that anything should have been done to wound the 
feelings of Friends, that they found no opportunity to pronounce sentence, and 
Mrs. Frazer remained a "birth-right Friend" throughout her life. 

She worshipped at her husband's church while he lived, but in her widow- 
hood she resumed the '"plain garb," and again attended, at least at times, the 
Qtiaker meeting. 

Upon being once remonstrated with by some Friends who thought she had 
forfeited her rights, she replied: "No, you have lost your opportunity to ]iut 
me out, and if I come to want, you will have to support me." 

She retained good health, and a fair share of strength till she was about 
eighty-four years old, when she had a serious faihire of her digestive system. 
Recognizing ap]iarently that her work was nearly done she took her horse 
and "chair" and accompanied by her grand-daughter, Emma Vaughan Smith, 
she spent several days riding around the neighborhood where she had lived so 
long, that she might say farewell to all her friends. She rallied from this, and 
is remendiered always to have come down to her meals till her last illness, 
which was brought abottt probably by a hearty meal of rockfish, of which she 
was very fond. It was perhaps a case of what would now be called "ptomaine 
poisoning." She died a year later at the house of her daughter, Mary Smith, 
of catarrh fever. She is buried, as her husband was, at Middletown Presby- 
terian church, Delaware county. 

She was remembered bv her last surviving grand-datighter as an uncom- 
monly handsome woman, somewhat over medium height, of a well rounded, but 
not too full figure, a very fine, fair complexion, very elegant and gracious man- 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 121 

ners, aud a superb horsewoman. She retained to the end her interest in the 
att'airs of the farm. Her grand-daughter remembers that the last ride she took 
was with her son-in-law, Joseph Smith, to see an unusually fine growth of corn 
in one of his helds on the South Valley hill, aud the pleasure with which she 
told that the corn was so tall that while sitting on her horse she could not reach 
the tops of the stalks with her riding whip. 

In her last days when summoned to meals she would reach for a curiously 
fashioned walking stick, made of sassafras wood, and lean one hand on this 
and the other on the shoulder of her grand-daughter, Rhoda, then a child of 
twelve years of age, who was immensely pleased to be called "Grandma's little 
cane." 

The estimation in which she was held by her contemporaries is shown by 
this obituary notice of her, written apparently by some clergyman who knew 
her: 

"The deceased was a woman of remarkably strong mind, and retained her 
faculties very little impaired to her last moments, and in all the relations of 
life sTistained the reputation of a kind neighbor, a faithful friend, an agree- 
able companion, an affectionate wife, and a kind and indulgent mother. 

"From the circumstance of her husband having entered the army at an 
early period of the Revohitionary War, on the side of American independence, 
the whole care of a family of small children, together with the management 
of a farm devolved upon her during that gloomy period, and in addition to all 
these duties, which were faithfully performed, she contributed largely to the 
comfort of the sick and destitute soldiers, by procuring medicine aud other 
necessaries. 

"Few persons have spent so long and useful a life, and descended to the 
grave with such an imblemished reputation. 

"Her de]5ortnient was always dignified and choerfiil, and though she 
endured like others the infirmities of age, she never gave way to fi'etfulness or 
complaining, but in all her trials displayed a degree of resignation and forti- 
tude seldom to be met with, even in the stronger sex, and with a full reliance 
ui>iin the merits of a crucified Saviour she left this wurld in full confidence of 
a happy eternity." 

It is a work of supererogation to paint the lily, and few words should be 
needed to call attention to the heroism, patriotism, coTirage and fortitude of 
[his noble woman. When battle is joined at Brandywine, six miles away, she 
mounts her horse, not to flee to a place of safety, but to hover around the field 
all day to see what help she can render. When her home is invaded by the 
enemy, she uses her time, not to escape, but to put her house in order, and 
to care for the safety of her children and her household. 

Although left alone with only black Rachel, she coolly withstands the whole 
force of invaders, claims her rights, and secures them, compels respect and 
obedience from officers and soldiers, has siifRcient composure to be amused at 
Rachel's embarrassment about the improvised petticoat; and when the long day 



122 TItE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

is over, and the strain is relaxed, does not faint, but calls in the hungry chil- 
dren, gathers up the few viands left by the marauders, and has a meal 
prepared. 

\Vhen she sets out in the afternoon of a hot September day with her 
ilauglitcr, nine years old, as her sole escort, to carry comforts to the prisoners in 
Philadelphia, and to solace her own heart by the sight of her husband, how 
finely the handsome matron faces down the too gallant officer at Darby, and 
compels him to obedience by her imperious power of command! Well might 
her daughter remark on her beauty. It must then have been seen to even 
greater advantage than when as bride and groom she and her husband entered 
the ]Middleto^\ai Presbyterian church, and were pronounced the handsomest 
couple ever seen there. 

What cool courage carried her after dark through miles of forests, and 
through the Hessian camp, calmly allaying her daughter's fears by telling her 
the British sentinels would protect them if needful! What wonder that even 
her steadfast nature begged for a little respite next day, after a ride of twenty 
miles on horseback, under such conditions of bodily health, heat and anxiety! 

\Miat noble courage and endurance stayed her when she carried the greet- 
ings of the prisoners in Philadelphia, and their eloquent plea of worm-eaten 
rations to Washington at White Marsh, braving the dangers of the search at 
Gray's Ferry, riding twenty miles to her home, taking a hasty meal, mounting 
a fresh horse, merciful to her beast, but uns]>aring of herself, and preparing 
for thirty miles more of a ride to the American camp, braving heavy rain, 
drunken and brawling soldiers, a raging river ford, and a ride that must have 
lasted till midnight, and making no comment nor fuss about it ! Truly, he 
who wrote her obituary might have spared his allusion to the stronger sex. 
The universal verdict of her family is right in saying that they have had no 
nobler ancestor than this imperial woman. 

Isaac Taylor (XVI 4). His wife was a daughter of Joseph Townsend. 
She is remembered as "Aunt Bess," a woman of violent temper, whose per- 
secutions finally drove her husband to sea. Mary Worrall Taylor (XVI 3), 
says, under date of July 6, 1777, jn a letter to her husband, Persifor Frazer: 
"Brother Isaac has come home, and is much pleased with Carolina, and is 
going there with his family in two months' time to settle in Hillsborough" (N. 
C). This intention may have been carried out, as we find his first and third 
child reported as living in North Carolina at a later date. We may suppose 
that the quarrel and departure to sea occurred not long after the removal to 
Xorth Carolina. He was never heard from again, and his sister Mary, to the 
end of her life, lived in daily expectation of his return. Their children are 
thought later to have removed to Beaver, Pa. His sister, Mary, writes to her 
husband. Colonel Frazer, August 22, 1778 — that she had recently been at 
Brother Isaac's. The last note about him in the Frazer correspondence is dated 
March 5, 1779, when Persifqr Frazer writes to him at Colonel Knox's house 
in Southwark, Philadelphia. 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 123 

Sarah Taylor (XVI 5) received a considerable estate on the division of 
lier father's pro23erty in 1775, but she became convinced that her husband had 
mismanaged it, and as he had sacrificed a considerable portion, and had 
"deserted her and the children, and left them utterly destitute, having removed 
to some distant part of the frontiers, she prayed the Court of Quarter Sessions, 
which sat at Chester, February 24, 1784, for a separate maintenance out of the 
remains of her fortune, which was granted her. She had married when she 
was scarcely seventeen years old, and seems to have parted with her husband 
in less than ten years from that time. Her husband was of Aston township. 
He was a son of Robert Thomson, and his wife, Mary Scott, and a gi-andson of 

Robert Thomson, who married Rebecca . Mary Scott had the 

singular fortime to have been carried across the River Boyne, in Ireland, by a 
soldier when an infant on his pike. The thrust only pierced her clothes, and 
when he had crossed the river the child fell off and was picked up and cared 
for. Mrs. Persifor Frazer reports James Thompson as having lost the use of 
his left hand July 6, 1777. 

John Taylor (XVI 6). His first wife, and probably also the husband of 
Margaret Taylor (XVI 7), were children of Robert Moiilder, of Marcus Hook, 
who died in the fall of 1785. He was the factor of John Taylor (XIV 20), 
after the death of his son, Isaac (XV 4), in 1745. One of the wharves at 
Marcus Hook belonged to him, and was long known as Moulder's wharf. 
Robert Moulder was a son of Benjamin Moulder, of Chichester, who died in 
1731. Benjamin's wife was Prudence. John Taylor's will was made August 
IG, 1785, proved March 31, 1786. His executors were his sons-in-law, John 
Taylor and Jacob Ford. 

Margaret Taylor (XVI 7) left no children. Her husband died com- 
paratively young. 

There is but little known about the remaining members of this generation. 
Mrs. Morris (XVIII 8) says that the family of Thomas Taylor (XV 8) lived 
on her mother's estate in Thornbury township. 

Joseph Taylor (XVI 15) left a family of children. 

John Taylor (XVI 16). His wife, whose name is not kno^vn, was from 
New Jersey. He left no children. 

Isaac Taylor (XVI 21) was of Charlestown townshij), Chester Co. His 
wife, Mary Jackson, was of Reading. They were married in the Friends' 
Meeting there. They both died of yellow fever in Philadelphia, September 
18, 1793. They left no children. 



124 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 
GENERATION XVII. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BIBTH. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The CniLDREN of Mabt Empson (XVI 1) and Jonathan Hulings. 



XVII 
1 



William Empson 

Hulings. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 





The 


'niu,i!EN OF Mary Wokrall Taylor (XVI 3) and Persifok Frazer. 




2 


Sarah Frazer. 


never married. 


Jan. 11, 


17G9. 




Mar. 3, 1841. 




3 


Robert Frazer. 


I. Mary Bail. 






I. Mav 3.1798 










II. Elizalieth Fries. 


Aug. 30, 


1771. 


II. Oot.15,1803 


Jan. 20, 1821. 








III. Alice Yarnall. 






III. Feb. 11. ISIS 






4 


Mary Ann Frazer. 


Jonathan Smith. 


Feb. 17. 


1774. 


Oct. 16, 1794. 


Feb. 9. 1845. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


5 


Persifor Frazer. 


never married. 


Feb. 2t), 


1776. 




Sept. 29, 1798. 




6 


Martha Frazer. 




May 22. 


1778. 




July 20, 1778. 




V 


Mary Frazer. 


Joseph Smith. 


Jan. 14, 


1780. 


Feb. 27, 1800. 


May 23. 1862. 


West Chester, Pa. 


S 


John Frazer. 




Dee. 27, 


1781. 




Aug. 3. 178.3. 




9 


Martha Frazer. 


William Morris. 


Oct. 14. 


1783. 


Oct. 15, 1818. 


Jan. 27, 1867. 


Delaware Co., Pa. 


10 


Elizalieth Frazer. 




May 17. 


1786. 




May 13, 1788. 




11 


Elizabeth Frazer. 


Henry Myers. 


Dec. 17, 


1788. 


Jan. 9, 1812. 


Apr. 25. 1857. 


Delaware Co., Pa. 



The Children of Isaac Taylor (XVI 4) and Elizabeth To\vnsend. 



12 


Persifor Frazer 




















Taylor. 


Esther Hoopes. 






Aug. 


9, 1810. 


Nov. 


5, 1843 


New Brighton, Pa. 


13 


Sarah Tavior. 


never married. 












or 33. 




14 


Elizabeth Taylor. 


Severus. 


Aus. 2 


2. 177(!. 










Big Beaver River. 

Pa. 







rnE Children of Sakah Taylor (XVI 5) and James Thomson. 




15 

16 
17 

18 


John Taylor 

Thomson 
Robert Thomson. 
Mary Worrall 

Thomson. 
Martha Gray 

Thomson. 


Isaac Iluddleson. 


Mar. 12. 1769. 
Oct. 20, 1771. 

May 8, 1774. 

Jan. 20. IVVV. 


Dec. 31, 1800. 


July 20. 1784. 
Sept. 5, 1775. 

Aug. 15. 1775. 

Dee. 29, 1868. 





The Children of John Tayi/)r (XVI 6) and Elizabeth Moulder. 



19 
20 
21 
•'2 
23 



Mary Taylor. 
E.vdia Taylor, 
.lane Taylor. 
Ilmiria Tavior. 
Elizabeth Taylor. 



Nehemiah Maule. 
Richard Stead. 
Jacob Ford. 
Robert Jonah. 
John Taylor. 



THE TAYLOR FAMILY. 
GENERATIOX XVII. 



125 



MEMEEK OF F.^MILT. 



BIKTH. 



MAREI.1GE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of John Taylor (XVI 6) and Susan Price. 



xvir 

24 Two cbildrpn. 
25 



William Empson lluliiigs (XVII 1) was a physician, and a man of 
wtaltli. He died childless. 

For an account of the children of Mary Worrall Taylor (XVI 3), see 
Frazer genealogy. 

Persifor Frazer Taylor (XVII 12) writes, May 4, 1S04, from Washing- 
ton, D. C, to Joseph Smith, husband of Mary Frazer (XVII 7), and says 
that he is exceedingly busy fitting oiit the U. S. ships President, Congress, 
Constellation, John Adams and Essex for the Mediterranean. He is attached 
to the latter ship Essex, Captain James Barron, Commander. This was the 
expedition against Tripoli, of which Samuel Ilarron, brother of James, had 
charge in 1805. Taylor expected to sail in ten days. 

Martha Gray Thomson (XVII IS). Her letters to her cousin, Sarah 
Frazer (XVII 2), about the time of Martha's marriage, are of interest as 
showing a warm heart that had not learned to express itself naturally and 
took refuge in playful abuse. Her hiisband, Isaac Iliiddleson, was born 
about 1767. !!(> was a physician, and an Assistant in the Pennsylvania 
Hospital in Philadelphia in 1792. lie settled in Xorristown, Pennsylvania, 
in 1793, and died there ilarch 5, 1852. His family were of English origin. 
His great-grandfather was Isaac Iluddleson. His grandparents were William 
Huddleson, of Yorkshire, England, and Mary Welsh, wjio were early emi- 
grants to Pennsylvania, and his parents were Henry Huddleson and Elizabeth 
Bennet. 



TIIK TAVT.ni: FA:\rTT,Y. 



NOTES. 



TIIK TAVLOR FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE TAVr.OI! FA>riT,Y. 



NOTES. 



THE TAVr.OR FAJFII.Y. 



NOTKS. 



THE PARRY FAMILY. 

Lower in his work on "Family Surnames" says that the Parrys of 
Rhydoleon Carnarvon are of very ancient descent from Moreiddig (Meredith, 
pronounced Muhreddy to this day in Chester county) and those of Moyadd 
Trefawr from Eyys Chirith body squire of Edwin I, and a descendant of the 
ancient lords of Cardigan. 

The name is explained as the Welsh form of Ap Harry or the son of Henry, 
while on the English side of the border the same name becomes Harry's or 
Harris. 

The family of whom this memoir treats came from Wales. They were 
Baptists; they were troubled in their native land by attacks about their re- 
ligious belief, and they emigrated to America about 1700 for religious freedom. 

They first appear in Whiteland township in 1712, in which year Llewellyn 
Parry was present at the marriage of his brother-in-law, Richard Thomas, and 
Grace Atherton. John Parry appears in Haverford township first in 1715, and 
James Parry is found in Tredyifrin township in 1713. 

Margaret Parry, daughter of John Pari-y (XVI 2), a descendant of 
Llewellyn Parry, says that the original home of the Parrys was near Samuel 
Baldwin's, between the Pennsylvania railroad and the Lancaster turnpike, one 
mile west of Downingtown, Chester county, Pennsylvania. 

The other Parrys of the fourteenth generation, the emigi'ants, seem to 
have settled within the limits of the Welsh tract, a barony or semi-independent 
government of 40,000 acres which, by William Penn's direction, was set apart 
for the Welsh, lying roughly west of the Schuylkill river, south of the "North 
Valley hill," boimding the gi'eat valley of Chester covinty, north of the boundary 
between Chester and Delaware counties, and east of West Chester. The scheme 
was never perfected, but the early Welsh emigrants settled largely within these 
boundaries. 

About 1840 the story became current in Chester county that there was in 
the Bank of England in London a fortune of twenty millions of dollars which 
belonged to the Parry family. This led to vigorous correspondence which 
elicited much information, but some of the statements were conflicting, and 
the following account, which is the result of several efforts I have made to 
tabulate the record, seems to be as near the truth as I can now make it from 
the data. 



127 



128 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTKY. 
GENERATION XIV. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILT. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


XIV. 
1 

O 

3 


Llewellyu rarr.v. 
James Parry. 
Rowhiiid Parry. 


JIary Thomas. 
Ann 


abont 1670. 


about 1700. 


aftor 1715. 

JIareb, 172G. 

about 1737. 


Whiteland Twp., 
Chester Co., Pa 

Tredyffriu Twp., 
Chester Co.. Pa 

Haverford Twp., 

Moutgoniery Co., Pa 



Llewellyn Parry (XIV 1) : His wife, Mary Thomas, was a daugliter 
of Kiehard ap Thomas, who was a landholder in Whitford garden, Flint- 
shire, Wales, having a freehold of £300 per year. The name Whiteland 
is sn])posed to be derived from Whitford, He bought 5,000 acres of land 
from William Penu, Jnly 24 and 25, 1(381, for £110. Richard ap Thomas 
died in Philadeli^hia in 1683, his will being dated November 18, 1683. 
Mary Thomas was a sister of Richard Thomas, 2d, of Whiteland townshii"). 
Richard Thomas, 2d, returned to Wales in 169!) and brought his sister Mary 
out to Pennsylvania with him. He died in 1744. Llewellyn Parry lived near 
Downingtow^l in what is now West Whiteland, on its west boundary where it 
crosses the Chester Valley railroad. His name appears on the taxable list of 
Whiteland in 1726. 

James Parry (XIV 2) was appointed a constable of Whiteland town- 
ship, October 3, 1709. He is first recorded as a purchaser of 100 acres of 
land in Tredyilrin township from Thomas Hubbard, March 20, 1713. His 
will wa.s made February 20, 1726, ]n-obated December 1. 1726. It mentions 
his wife, Ann, and his children, John the eldest, whom he appoints his 
executor, David ; Lettice, wife of Lewis William ; Elizabeth, wife of James 
Davies; Margaret, Mary and Hester, the two latter not being 21 years of age. 

His will directs the payment of one ])ound "to the trustees of the Presby- 
terian meeting house in Tredyffrin (t e., the Great Valley Presbyterian 
church) within six months after my decease, towards paying the charges and 
debts of the said buildings." 

To his eldest son John he bequeathed all his real estate. To his son 
David he gave £25 as "also one year's diet if he continues teaching in the place 
where he now is in this township of Tredyffriu." This school wa^ near the 
church. 

Rowland Parry (XIV 3): Of him we have only the note that he was a 
tanner, and having a resolution to go to sea and thence to the Island of 
Barbados, he made his will February 10, 1714, which was not proved till 
Xovembcr 22, 1737, in which he names his four children as they are given 
in the table. He says nothing of bis wife who perhaps had died before 1714. 



THE PARRY FAMII-Y. 
GENERATION XV. 



129 



ME5IBER OF FAMILY. 



BIKTH. 



MARBIAQE. 



RGSIDBNCa. 



The Children ok Llewellyn P.\brt (XIV 1) and Mart Thomas. 



XV 

1 James Pairy. 
Margaret Parry. 
Ann Parry. 



Margaret Rankin. 
AVilliara Bull. 
John Hunter. 



about 1743. 



The Children of James Parry (XIV 2) and Ann 



4 


John Parrv. 


Martha Jones. 


about 169.J. 


Jan. 5, 1729. 


Jul.v. 1717. 


Tredyffrin Twp. 


5 


David Parrv. 


Elizabeth Davis. 




Mar. 6, 1727. 


Feb. 174S. 


Tredyffnn Twp. 


6 


Lettice Parry. 


I. Lewis William. 
II. Ree^. 










1 


Elizabeth Parrv 


James Davies. 










8 


Marcaret Parrv. 




Oct.. IfiOT. 








9 


Jilary Parry. 


Malaohi Jones. 


about 1705. 


Jan. 27, 1729. 






10 


Hester Parry. 




about 1707. 









The Ciiiliiren of Rowland Pakry (XIV 3) and 



11 


John Parrv. 


Hannah Llewellvn. 


1691. 




Sept. 24. 1740. 


Haverford. Del. Co. 


n 


David Parrv. 


Mary Humphreys. 




Sept. 27, 1735. 


May, 1748. 


Abington, Montg. Co. 


13 


Anne Parry. 


I. Hugh Pugh. 
II. Isaac Lewis. 


about 169.5, 


I. about 1713. 
II. about 1720. 


Oct. 1709. 


Uwchlan, Chester Co. 


14 


Emma Parry. 


John Vaughan. 


1700. 


1729. 


1791. 


Uwchlan, Chester Co. 



Ann Parry (XV 3) : Her husband, John Hunter, was a tanner of White- 
land tomiship." His will is dated July 30, 1751, and probated October 1, 1751. 

John Parry (XV 4), and Mary Parry (XV 0): Their consorts were a 
sister and brother, and were the children of Eev. Malachi Jones, of Abington, 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, who was born in Wales in 1651, and was 
educated and ordained tlicre. He became, in September, 1714, the first pastor 
of the Presbyterian church of Abington, and ministered to that church till 
his death, ]\Iarch 2(5, 1729. The marriages were solemnized by Rev. Jcdidiah 
Andrews, pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Philadelphia, where the 
marriages are recorded. 

John Parry'.s will, made April 22, 1747, probated October 15, 1747, makes 
his brother David executor, mentions all his sisters and several other relatives. 
He apparently had no children and his wife had died. He leaves to his 



130 THE SMITJI COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

cousins (or nieces, as they would now be called), Margaret Davis and Margaret 
Williams, £10 each "for their extraordinary good behavior while they lived 
with me." He leaves his watch to his cousin Rowland Parry (XVI 25), his 
English house Bible to his cousin Hannah Parry (XVI 24), and an English 
Bible to his cousin Tabitha Parry (XVI 21). He granted to the Great Valley 
Presbyterian church in TredyiFrin the lands on which the church was built, 
and took great interest in it. John Parry was a justice of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas, appointed December 17, 1745, and held office through the rest of 
his life. His wife Elizabeth Davis was a daughter of Morris Davis and a 
gi-anddaughter of James David of Tredyffrin. After David Pari-y's death 
she married John Hackett. 

David Parry (XV 5) : His will, made February 22, 1748, mentions only 
his wife Elizabeth and children Caleb, Tabitha and Joshua. The rest seem 
to have died early. The land went to Caleb — one-half on his coming of age, 
the rest at his mother's death. He taught school for a time, about the time 
of his father's death, in 1726, at or near the Great Valley Presbyterian church. 
He was active in the French and Indian war. 

David Parry was admitted to the Great Valley Baptist church September 
20, 1740. His will was made February 22, 1748, and probated March 23, 
1748. His children were all baptized in the Irish Presbyterian church of 
Abington by Rev. Michael Treat. 

John Parry (XV 11) was a large landowner. He appears among the 
taxables of Haverford in 1715, and among the road sujjervisors in a list of 
those who served between 1725 and 1753. He held numerous offices during his 
life-time, and was a man of mark. He is named among the Justices of the 
Court of Common Pleas, appointed in 1730, 1733 and 1738, holding this 
office till his death, and he was a member of Assembly in 1724, 1727, 1728, 
1730, 1731, 1735 and 1730. He was Coimty Assessor from 1732 to 1736. He 
was elected Sheriff October 3, 1732, and annually thereafter till October, 1740, 
his term of service thus lasting eight years. In October, 1738, he was one of 
two persons chosen by the people according to the existing rule which gave the 
Supreme Executive Council the right to choose between the two named by 
the people. The majority of the Board opposed Parry, but James Logan and 
Clement Plumstead endorsed him so strongly, stating that "he had been SherifF 
before, and had executed that office with great integTity and a becoming reso- 
lution in difficiilt times," that Governor Thomas commissioned him Sheriff 
and Justice of the Peace at the same time. 

He inherited from his father the homestead of 380 acres, and iu 1739 
he purchased from William Allen, Esq., of Philadelphia, who had bought it in 
1737, the ]\[anor of Bilton, a tract of 2,850 acres which was part of 10,000 
acres in the southeastern part of Charlestown township which William Penn 
in 1681 conveyed to his sister Margaret Lowther and her family. In right 



TJIE I'AERY FAMILY. 



131 



of which grant and as part thereof the manor was laid out on the west side 
of tlie Schuylkill and separated from the manor of Mount Joy by the Valley 
creek. In 1733 it was resurveyed. John Parry probably bought this prop- 
erty as the agent of a syndicate, as it was divided among twelve persons. 

Ilis wife Hannah Llewellyn was a daughter of Morris Llewellyn of 
Pembrokeshire, South Wales, and Hannah Parry. Morris Llewellyn was born 
iSTovember 9, 1645. He bought 500 acres of land from William Penn before 
1684. Hannah Llewellyn was born 1694, died April 12, 1777. After the 
death of her Imsband in 1740 she continued to live at the old homestead, al- 
though it was given by her husband's will to their son Rowland Parry (XVI 
23), and carried on the tannery there which his father had started till the out- 
break of the Revoluntionary War. The Parry homestead was in possession of 
George Lindsay in 1851. 

John Parry's will, dated July 14, 1740, probated October 21, 1740, 
names his wife and children, gives Rowland, his only son, his home planta- 
tion subject to his wife's one-third interest, and directs the Manor of Bilton 
to be sold to pay his debts. 

He is buried at the Great Valley Presbyterian church. His tomb has 

this inscription: — 

"Here Ueth ye Body of 

lohn Parry of Haverford 

■who departed this life ye 

September 24th, 1740, 

Aged 49 years." 

David Parry (XV 12). He was called "David of Abington." He was 
married by Rev. Jedidiah Andrews. He was a captain in the Associate Regi- 
ments of Chester county. In the war which was declared March 29, 1744, 
by England against France there were apprehensions which proved to be well 
founded that the Indians would join the French. As the Provincial Assembly 
declined to pass an effective militia law the defence of the settlement was left 
to voluntary action. A regiment was raised mostly in the Scotch-Irish and 
Welsh townships of East and West iSlantmeal, West Cain, Uwchlan and 
Charlestown, with William Moore as Colonel. Not much seems to have been 
preserved of the history of the military body ; but it remained in existence for 
some years, and on February 8, 1748, commissions were granted to the officers 
of two regiments, David Parry standing at the head of the list of 26 cap- 
tains. If there was not much active service the association no doubt kept 
military feeling alive and served as a training school for officers of the Revolu- 
tionary War. They were said to be the finest body of volunteer soldiers in 
America. 

It is worth noting that Judge Tench Coxe maintained that when the 
Quakers settled Pennsylvania, though they wonld not bear arms themselves, 
they hardly felt safe ^vith their northern and western frontiers nnguarded 
from the attacks of Indians, and they offered inducements to a body of Irish 
from the northeast corner of the island to come over and settle there on the 



132 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 



exposed western frontier, while they put the Welsh to the northward. The 
Quakers of the present day deny this motive for the arrangement of the 
settlers. 

Anne Parry (XV 13) had children who are named in her brother 
David's will. 

Emma Parry (XV 14) married John Vanghan (XV 1) — see Vaughan 
Recoi-d for an account of him. After his death, in ITaO, she lived with her 
only daughter, Margaret Vaughan (XVI 4) who, in 1758, married Robert 
Smith (XVI 4). The mother and daughter became Baptists and were 
admitted to the Great Valley Baptist church, October, 1756. They were dis- 
missed with 49 other persons from that church to form a branch, the Vincent 
Baptist church, kSp])tcmber 21, 1771, which was constituted a church on 
October 12, 1771. The Vincent church, which is on the boundary line 
between Vincent and Pikeland townships, was probably nearer to ilargaret's 
home than the Great Valley church. With advancing years Emma Parry 
became blind and her grandsons Jonathan and Joseph Smith (Smith XVII 15 
and XVII 17) used to be called on to read to her out of her Welsh Bible. Not 
being learned in that langiiage, nor especially interested in their task their 
I'eading did not always please the old lady who, though deprived of her sight, 
could generally tell her grandsons' whereabouts nearly enough to rap their 
heads for mispronunciation. It is not nnich to be wondered at ; mispro- 
nounced Welsh mu«t be sufficient to try the patience even of a blind saint. 

GENERATION XVI. 



INDEX 



.ME^EBEK OF FAMILY. 



CONSORT. 



MAKRIAI-.E. 



RESIDEN'CB. 



The CniLDKEN of Jamks P.\krt (XV 1) amd Mabgaret Rankin. 



XVI 














1 


David Parrv. 


Elizabeth. 


Dec. 22. 1T44. 




Sept. 20, 1704. 




2 


.John Parry. 


Hannah Dilworth. 


Mar. 12. ITtC. 


Nov. 4. 177.5. 


Dec. 19, 1S34. 


Dilworthtown, Pa. 


3 


James I'arry. 




•Tan. 2<5. 1T4!I. 








4 


Elizalieth Parry. 




Doe. 111. 17.50. 




Apr. 25, 175G. 




5 


Rankin PariT. 




July 5, 17.^2. 








6 


Llewellyn Parry. 




Mar. IG, 17.5.5. 






Stillwater, Ohio, 


7 


Margaret Parry. 




Oct. 6. 17.58. 




May 14, 1817. 





The Ciiilukex of Marg-mjet P.abry (XV 2) and William Bull. 



Thomas Bull. 



I. Ann Hunter. 
II. Lydia Crowell. 



June !). 1744, | I. Feb. 28.1771,! July 1.3, 1837, 
II, 1810, 



\\'arwick Twp., 

Chester Co.. Pa. 



THE PAREY FAMILY. 
GENERATION XVI. 



133 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BIBTH. 



UARBIAQB. 



BBSIDHNCa. 



The Childeen of Ann Parby (XV 3) and John Hunteb. 



XVI 














9 


James Hunter. 








1781. 




10 


John Hunter. 








in .youth. 




11 


Hannah Hunter. 


Malachi Jones. 




1759. 






12 


Margaret Hunter. 


VPiUiam Bull. 










13 


Elizabeth Hunter. 


William Jones. 










14 


Ann Hunter. 


Thomas Bull. 


1745. 




Aug. 31, 1817. 




15 


Mary Hunter. 


Eli Bentley. 




Nov. 20, 1772. 






16 


Martha Hunter. 


John Battew. 


1752. 









The Children of David Fabry (XV 5) and Elizabeth Davis. 



17 


Ann Parry. 




Dec. 


4, 1728. 




died young. 




IS 


James Parry. 




Nov. 


4. 1731. 




in infancy. 




19 


James Parrv. 




July 


8, 1733. 




died young. 




20 


Caleb Parry. 


Elizabeth Jacobs. 


Feb. 


9, 1735. 


Dec. 15, 1761. 


Aug. 27, 1776. 


Easttown Twp. 


21 


Tabitha Parry. 


Abraham Wayne. 


Mar. 


3, 1737. 


1760. 


Oct. 15, 1781. 




22 


Joshua Parry. 


Ann Hammer. 


Jan. 


28, 1739. 


1761. 


July 4, 1813. 





The Children of Maey Pabby (XV 9) and Malachi Jones. 



Malachi Jones. 
William Jones. 



Mary Hunter. 
Elizabeth Hunter. 



1759. 



The Children of John Pakey (XV 11) and Hannah Llewellyn. 



25 


Rowland Parry. 


Hannah Evans. 




about 1750. 




Duck Creek Hun- 
dred, Kent Co., Md. 


26 


Hannah Parry. 


Evans. 






1769. 




27 


Mary Parry. 


Jacob Hall. 










28 


Susanna Parry. 












29 


Margaret Parry. 


Charles Humphries. 










30 


Sarah Parry. 


John Hall. 








Oxford, Bucks Co. 


31 


Martha Parry. 


Richard Pea me. 




July, 1761. 







The Children of David Parry (XV 12) and Mary Humphbeys. 



32 


John Parry. 


Anne Francis. 












33 


Mary Parry. 


I. Joseph Francis. 
II. James Williams. 




1. 
TI. 


Dec.. 1759. 
Oct. 1763. 






34 


Hannah Parry. 














35 


David Parry. 


Hackett. 













134 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTKT. 
GENERATION XVI. 



INDEX 
.NO. 



UBMBBR OF FAMILT. 



BIRTH. 



MARBIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children of Emma Fabry (XV 14) and John Vaughan. 



XVI 
















36 


Joshua VauRhan. 




Sept. 19, 1730. 










37 


Jonathan Vaughan. 


Ann. 


Aug. 7, 1732. 










38 


Margaret Vaughan. 


Robert Smith. 


Nov. 1, 1733. 


Dec. 20, 1758. 


Mar. 18, 1822. 


Uwchlan 


Twp. 


39 


Joseph Vaughan. 




June 3, 1738. 










40 


Isaac Vaughan. 




Oct. 23, 1743. 




died young. 







David Parry (XVI 1) and Llewellyn Parry (XVI 6) left families. 

Jolm Parry (XVI 2). His wife Ilanuah Dilworth was a daughter of 
-Tames and Lydia Dilworth, of Birniinghani township, Delaware County. 
They lived after the Battle of Brandywine at Sconnelltowu, near the battle- 
field. They left a family. 

James Parry (XVI 3) had no heirs living in 1849. 

Eankin Parry (XVI 5) and Margaret Parry (XVI 7) had no children. 
Rnnkin Parry is remembered as having the Welsh gift of a fine voice. 

Thomas Bnll (XVI 8) was in early life a stonemason. Later, but 
before the Revolutionary "War, he was manager of the Wai-wick furnace in 
Warwick township, Chester coimty, wliicli was owned by Potts and Eutter. 

He entered the army in the Revolution and rose to be Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the regiment of Pennsylvania troops commanded by Colonel Richard 
Thomas. He was later appointed Colonel of the Pennsylvania State Regi- 
mout, but for some reason the appointment was unsatisfactory to the officers 
of the regiment, and he was made Adjutant-General of the State Militia, 
vacating his regimental commission. 

After his sen-ice with the army ended, he again became manager of the 
Warwick furnace. He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 
1790, and a member of the State Legislature in 1783 and 178,5 and from 
1793 to 1801. 

He owned, till within a few years of his death, nine-sixteenths of Joanna 
furnace. About 1831 Judge William Darling, of Reading, and Levi Bull 
Smith bought the furnace, and it remains still in possession of the family of 
Levi Bull Smith. 

Thomas Bull was, about 1810, one of the projectors of the Conestoga 
turnpike. His first wife, Ann Hunter, the mother of all his children, born 



THE PAREY FAMILY. 135 

1745, died August ?>1, 1817, was a daughter of John and Ann Iluntor, of 
Whiteland township. 

He was one of the corporators of St. Peter's Protestant Episcopal 
Church of Great Valley, East Whiteland, March 4, 1786, but as this was 
far from his home he assisted in building St. Mary's Church in Warwick 
township, in 1805, and worshipped there thereafter. He was a man of large 
estate and of great influence. His second wife was a widow of Cape May, 
N. J. She survived him several years. 

Caleb Parry (XVI 20) bought from James Martin, April 3, 17G2, one- 
half of two tracts of laud and his mills in East Whiteland township. He 
later bought the other half, and sold the whole March 27, 1769. In 1760 
he was one of five assessors who adjusted the taxes on the whole of Chester 
county. In 1768 and 1769 he kept the Admiral Warren tavern in East 
Whiteland. At the outbreak of the Revolution he was proprietor of the 
Leopard tavern in Easttown township, Chester county. September 30, 1775, 
he was one of the commissioners to view the Schuylkill river, probably to 
report upon its defensibility. 

He went early into the Revolutionary army and in March, 1776, he was 
commissioned Lieutenant-Colonel of Colonel Sanuiel J. Atlee's regiment and 
soon marched with his command to the defence of New York. April 26, 1776, 
an order drawn in his favor for £250 for the use of the Musket Battalion. 
His regiment was taken from the State service into the Continental service 
Jidy 5, 1776. 

Colonel Atlee in his report of the battle of Long Island, Aiigust 27, 
1776, says: — "My regiment took possession of a hill on the army's left to 
oppose the enemy's right, attempting to outflank them, and after a brisk fire 
drove the enemy from behind a stone fence 60 yards beyond the summit. 
In this severe conflict I lost my worthy friend Lieutenant-Colonel Parry, 
whom, in the midst of the action, and immediately after he fell, I ordered 
to be borne by four soldiers off the field into the lines at Brooklyn." Colonel 
Daniel Brodhead, who, by the capture of Colonel Miles and Colonel Atlee, 
was left the senior oificer in command of Pennsylvania troops, reports, Sep- 
tember 5, 1776 : — "Colonel Parry died like hero." 

The family tradition says that his hat, through which the ball that killed 
him passed into liis forehead, was long preserved at his home. Colonel 
Parry's widow and children, in consideration of his Revolutionary services, 
received patents for nearly 2,000 acres of Innd in Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania. 

His wife, Elizabeth Jacobs, born December 5, 1732, died Augnist 25; 
1805, was a daughter of John Jacob':, Jr., wlio was a son of John Jacobs whc 
settled on Perkiomen Creek about 1700, and Mary Hayes, daughter of Rich- 
ard Hayes, of Haverford, and Elizabeth Lewis. Elizabeth Jacob's parents 
were married ISTovember 2, 1721. Her brother John Jacobs (3rd), was of 



136 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 



East Whiteland. He was speaker of the Pennsylvania Assembly in 1776, 
and member of the Constitutional Convention of that year. Elizabeth's sis- 
ter married David Rittenhouse the astronomer. 

Joshua Parry (XVI 22) removed afterwards to Virginia. He was a 
blacksmith. He Iwught, February 9, 17G1, five acres and twenty-five perches 
of his father's farm from his mother and his brother Caleb Parry. He sold 
it August 21, 17C2, to David Jones, of TredyfFrin. 

Rowland Parry (XVI 25) lived at Duck Creek Hundred, Maryland. 
He was an ensign of the company of Captain William Bull in one of the 
two Associate Regiments in 1747 and 17-48. His wife was the daughter of 
Cadwalader Evaus, of Edgniout township, Pa. 

Hannah Parry (XVI 26). Letters of administration on her estate were 
gi-anted to Rowland Parry, Xovcniber 13, 1769. 

Mary Parry (XVI 27). Her husband, Jacob Hall, was a brother of 
John Hall who married Sarah Parry (XVI 30). 

Sarah Parry (XVI 30). Her husband, John Hall, of the Wheat Sheaf 
tavern, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, was Sheriff of Bucks county in 1733 
and 1734. His sister Mary Hall, married Judge Rush, father of Dr. James 
Rush and Samuel Rush. 

David Parry (XVI 35) left no children. 

Eor notices of children of Emma Parry and John Vaughau (XVI 36 to 
XVI 40) see Vaughan record. 



GENERATION XVII. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER 01' FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. MAKRIAOB, | DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


The Children of David Parry (XVI 1) and Elizabeth. 


xvn 
1 

2 


Clark Sniitli Parry. 
.Tesse Parry. 












The Children of Rankin Parry (XVI 5) and 


3 

4 


Caleb Parry. 
John Parry, 













THE FABRY FAMILY. 
GENERATION XVII. 



137 



INDBZ 
RO. 



MBMBBR OF FAMILY. 



BIBTH. 



MABRIAGEI. 



HBSIDBNCH. 



The Children of Thomas Bull (XVI 8) and Ann Hunter. 



XVII 














5 


Elizabeth Bull. 


John Smith. 


Deo. 19, 1771. 


Dec. 23, 1790. 


Mar. 23, 1855. 


Joanna, Berks Co. 


6 


Mary Bull. 


Alexander Cobean. 


July 10, 1774. 




Nov. 7, 1798. 




7 


Ann Bull. 


Waters Dewees. 


Feb. 11, 1776. 




18.50. 




8 


Martha Bull. 


I. James McCIintock. 
II. Samuel Shafer. 


Feb. 20, 1779. 




Mar. 12, 1850. 




9 


Sarah Bull. 


never married. 


Feb. 20, 1779. 




1817. 




10 


Levi Bull. 


I. Ann Jacobs. 
II. Margaretta Old. 


Nov. 14, 1780. 


I. 1808. 


Aug. 2, 1S59. 


St. Marys. Warwick 
Township. 


11 


James Hunter Bull. 




Dec. 31, 1782. 








12 


Margaret Bull. 


James Jacobs. 


Feb. 7, 1787. 




about 1819. 





The Children op Caleb Parry (XVI 20) and Elizabeth Jacobs. 



13 


Rowland Parry. 


Esther Carter. 


1762. 






1796. 


Philadelphia. 


14 


John Jacobs Parry. 


Margaret Palmer. 


1763. 


July 28, 1804. 


Apr. 


29, 1835 


Philadelphia. 


15 


Esther Parry. 


Ouilliaem Aertsen. 


Nov. 10, 1764. 


July 17. 1790. 


Apr. 


9, 1815. 




16 


Hannah Parry. 


Thomas McEwen. 




June 17, 1794. 




1827. 




17 


Mary Parry. 


.lames Musgrave. 




Aug. 16. 1795. 








18 


James Parry, 


Agnes. 













The Children of Tabitha Parry (XVI 21) .\nd Abr.\iiam Wayne. 



19 
20 
21 



Caleb Parry Wayne. 
Esther Wayne. 
Enoch Wayne. 



Clark. 



Philadelphia. 



The Children of Joshua Parry (XVI 22) and Ann Hammer. 



22 


John Parry. 












23 


Caleb Parry. 












24 


David Parry. 


Rosa May. 










25 


Elizabeth Parry. 


Wasson. 










26 


Ann Parry. 


Brand. 











The Children of Sarah Parry (XVI 28) and .John Hai.l. 



27 


Ruth Hall. 


Matthew McConnel. 


1758. 


1780. 






28 


Thomas Hall. 












29 


Marv Hall. 


Alexander Fullerton. 










30 


Rowland Hall. 












31 


John Hall. 












32 


Jacob Hall. 


Mary. 











138 



THE SillTH COLLATERAL ANCESTEY. 
GENERATION XVII. 



INDEX 

NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



The Children of Marcauet Vaughan (XVI 36) and Robert Smith. 



XVII 




















33 


Emma Smith. 


Robert Porter. 


Nov. 17, 


1759. 


about 1785. 






Finleyville, P.i. 


34 


Susanna Smith. 


Nathan Grier. 


Dec. 25, 


1760. 


Nov. 


13, 1787. 


Jan. 


2. 1812. 


Brandy wine 

Manor, Pa 


35 


John Smith. 


Elizabeth Bull. 


Apr. 8, 


1762. 


Dec. 


23, 1790. 


Apr. 


2, 1815. 


Joanna, 

Berks Co., Pa 


36 


Sarah Smith. 


never married. 


Oct. 1. 


176.3. 






Nov 


7. 1785. 




37 


Margaret Smith. 


Samuel Kennedy. 


June 24, 


1765. 






July 


12, 1847. 




38 


Jonathan Smith. 


Mary Ann Frazer. 


Aug. 2, 


1767. 


Oct 


16, 1794. 


Nov. 


20. 1839. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


39 


Robert Smith. 


Esther Kennedy. 


May 29, 


1769. 






Feb 


5, 1822. 




40 


Joseph Smith. 


Mary Frazer. 


Sept. 24. 


1770. 


Feb. 


27, 1800. 


Dee. 


18, 1845. 


Frazer, 

Chester Co., Pa 


41 


Isaac Smith. 




Feb. 9, 


1772. 






Mar. 


14, 1772. 




42 


Isaac Sniitli. 


Margaret Fleming. 


July 20, 


1773. 


Apr. 


19, 1804. 


Oct. 


8. 1840. 


Lancaster Co., Pa. 


43 


James Smith. 




Nov. 9, 


1777. 






Aug., 1778. 





Caleb Parry (XVII 3^ 
\vi(lo^vllood was in Ohio. 



His wife outlived him. Her home in her 



Elizabeth Bull (XVII 5). For an account of her husband, John 
Smith (XVII 11), .see Smith Record. 

Martha Bull (XVII 8). Her second husband, Samuel Shafer, was an 
Associate Judge of Chester county from 1S1!> to 185G. 

Levi Btdl (XVII 10) was born in Warwick township. He was grad- 
uated at Dickinson College in 1797, studied for the ministry under Rev. 
Xathan Grier, of Brandwwine Manor, was ordained by Bishop William 
White, deacon 1805, priest 1806. He did his life's work at St. Mary's 
Church, Warwick towaiship, where he is buried. He was a man of ample 
estate, large generosity and gi-eat influence. He received the degree of D.I)., 
was a prominent candidate for the succession to Bishop White, who died in 
1816; an intimate friend of Mrs. Joseph Smith who was of nearly the same 
age. 

His wife was a daughter of Cyrus Jacobs, of White Hall, Chui-chtowu, 
Lancaster county, Penna. They had fifteen children, of whom fourteen 
reached maturity, and seven siirvivcd him. 

Margaret Bull (XVII 12). Her husband, James Jacobs, was an Epis- 
copal clergyman, the brother of Levi Bull's (XVII 10) wife. 



THE PAEKT FAMILY. 139 

Esther Parry (XVII 15). Her hiisbaud, Guilliaem Aertseu, bom 
St. Eustatia, West Indies, December 13, 1759, died September 30, 180G, at 
C'harlestown, South Carolina, where many of the family still live. Their son, 
James Musgi-ave Aertsen (XVIII 31), married Harriet Romeyn Smith 
(XVITI). 

John Parry (XVII 22). A daughter of his married Charles Wayne. 

Ruth Hall (XVII 27). Her husband, Matthew McConuel, was a ilajor 
in the war of 1812. 

Thomas Hall (XVII 28) was an Episcopal clergyman. He died at 
Leghorn, Italy. 

For notices of children of ilargaret Vaiighan and Rol^ert Smith (XVII 
33 to XVII 43) see Smith record. 



THE PARUY FAMTIA'. 



NOTES. 



THE PARKY FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



TTTE PAR71Y FAMTIA'. 



NOTES. 



THE PARRY FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE ROBERT SMITH FAMILY. 



GENERATION XIV. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBEB or TAMILT. 


CONSORT. BIBTH. 


MABBIAOE. 


DEATH. 


BBSIDENCB. 


XIV 

1 

2 
3 

4 


Robert Smith. 

Sister. 
Thomas Smith. 

Alexander Smith. 


Mary Douglas. 
John Watson. 

Elizabeth Frazer. 


Sept. 5, 1678. 
1692. 


about 1712. 

about 1717. 
about 1718. 


1757. 

before 1766. 


Derry Hall, 
Co. Monaghan, 

Ireland. 
Derry Hall, 

Ireland. 
Clanickney, Donagh, 
Co. Monaghan, 

Ireland. 



Robert Smith (XIV 1) and Mary Douglas were Scotch Presbyterians. 
Their home was at Derry Hall, County Monaghan, Ireland, and they were 
people in comfortable circnmstanccs. An Irishman, who many years later 
worked for their grandson, Persifor Frazer (XVI 1), in America, represented 
them as the grandees of the neighborhood, and said, in proof of his assertion, 
that they had six daughters who rode to church on si.x side-saddles. The oldest, 
Mary, had maiTied before the time of which he spoke, and had gone to Penn- 
sylvania, which reduced the number to six. They objected to their eldest 
daughter's marriage to John Frazer; but the I'eason is not kno\vn, perhaps 
because ho was an adventurer going to a new country. His sister, Elizabeth 
Frazer, had married Mary's imcle, Alexander Smith, before John Frazer's 
marriage. 

Robert Smith died, apparently, about 1757, as his son-in-law, William 
Crookshanks, speaks in 1759, as if he had recently died. Mrs. Smith was 
living in 1759, but is not mentioned by William Crookshanks in his letter in 
1766. In the settlement of Robert Smith's estate a controversy arose about the 
lands of the estates of Cowan and Clanickney, which had been in his possession, 
in which John Greason and Alexander Montgomery, Sr., were charged with 
illegally appropriating with conspiracy. Sarah Smith's husband, William 
Crookshanks, was opposed to them. The last mention of this suit is November 
15, 1784, when an injunction and receiver are asked for. 

William Crookshanks says, in 1759, that he has assigned to Mrs. Smith, 
out of her husband's estate, which he had bought after his death, "seven acres 
of ground and the house at the standing rent," and has given her a cow and 
several other necessaries. Cowan and Clanickney were neighboring farms lying 
west of and near to Tonyhamigin where the Frazers lived. Robert Smith's land 

141 



142 



THE SMITH COLLATEEAL ANCESTRY. 



at Cleare was sold after his death, 
there in 1751). 



William Crookshanks bought it and lived 



Alexander Smith (XIV 4), "of Clanickney, Parish Donagh, Barony 
Treugh, County Monaghan, Ireland, gentlemen," writes to John Frazer in 
Pennsylvania, May 17, 1730, in regard to Frazer collecting a del)t due him 
by Thomas Johnston, late of Gallanagh, County Monaghan, since August, 1733. 
He and his family were reported by William Crookshanks as all well in 1759. 
They are not mentioned by him in 176G. Alexander was then dead. His 
widow lived half a mile from William Crookshanks. One daughter and two 
sons lived with her. Their son Robert lived in County Down in 1759, and 
\vas very well married. 

As this family of Smith were near neighbors of my great-great-graud- 
father, John Smith, born 1C8G, they may have been of the same family. John 
had a son Robert, who was my gi-eat-gi-andfather. 

GENERATION XV. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE 



The Childken of Robert Smitii (XIV 1) and Mary Douglas. 



XV 
















1 


Mary Smith. 


John Frazer. XV 5. 


Feb. 10, 


1713. 


June 10, 1735. 


July 5, 1764. 


Chester Co., Pa. 


2 


Martha Smith. 


Willson. 










Co. Monaghan. 


3 


Margai-etta Smith. 


Ailen Cook. 








about 1780. 


Dublin, Ireland. 


4 


-Andrew Smith. 


never married. 








about 175G. 


Clanickney, Ireland. 


5 


Elizabeth Smith. 


John G reason. 






1744. 




Co. Monaghan. 


6 


K^Ilen Smith. 


John Morrison. 










Chester Co., Pa. 


7 


■Jane Smith. 


John Armstrong. 






1744. 




Cleare, 

Co. Monaghan. 


8 


Sarah Smith. 


William Crookshanks. 


about 


1723. 


about 17.52. 


Dec, 17S3. 


Annagoola near Ty- 
nan, Middletown, 
Co. Armagh. 



The Childbes of Alexander Smith (XIV 4) and Euzabeth Frazer. 



9 


John Smith. 










Aghalaverty, 

Co. Monaghan. 


10 


Robert Smith. 




about 1719. 








11 


Marsar(?t H. Smith. 




about 1720. 








12 


Thomas Smith. 




about 1722. 








13 


Alice Smith. 












14 


Elizabeth Smith. 













Mary Smith (XV 1) was held in high esteem by her family. She seems 
to have been a woman of delicate health. Of her ten children, si.x died in 
infancy. She was apparently very prayerful and somewhat melancholy. Her 



THE "ROBERT SMITH FAMILY. 143 

daughter, Sarah, related that when she awoke in the night she frequently 
found her mother on her knees engaged in fervent prayer. This type of piety 
continued in her fauiily, especially in the female part, for severargenerations. 
There is but one brief letter of Mary Frazer's still in existence, written June 10, 
1755, to her husband, John Frazer, narrating her arrival at some port, Chester, 
Pa., probably, she having gone down the river to visit some of the family 
friends back of that town. 

For an account of John Frazer see Frazer Genealogy. 

Martha Smith (XV 2). In 1759 William Crookshanks reports her as 
"always living with j\Ir. Price," of whom, apparently, Persifor Frazer speaks as 
John Price in his letter of June 2, 1737. He speaks vei-y highly of her and 
says that she is doing very well. Her husband was then living. In 17G6 he 
reports her as being in Dublin, but as soon coming to live with him, from 
which it is probable that her husband was then dead. 

Margaretta Smith (XV 3). In 1759 William Crookshanks reports her as 
living with her husband, Allen Cook, in Dublin and again as livinjr there in 
1766. 

Andrew Smith (XV 4). He appears only in the indenture made by John 
and Mary Frazer, Decemljer 7, 1757, where he is spoken of as Mary's brother 
and as having deceased intestate and without issue. He was killed by accident 
at the burning of the family home at Clanickney. 

Elizabeth Smith (XV 5). In 1759 William Crookshanks reports that her 
husband, John Greason, or Graecen, has, with Elizabeth's mother, taken some 
stand with regard to the settlement of the estate of Robert Smith, who has 
recently died, which is opposed to Crookshanks' interest. He reports, however, 
that ''John Greason and his wife are well and in a very good way;" they had 
five children. In 1766 he says that she lives within half-a-mile of him. He 
speaks of Mr. ]\rathes, M'ho is to carry the letter he is writing to John Frazer, 
in Pennsylvania, as having bought some white cloth from John Greason, who 
may have been engaged in its manufacture. Mrs. Willson, who, in 1847, met 
Persifor Frazer (XVIII 4) in Ireland, was a descendant of the Greasons. 
She told him something of the history of the family in later years. 

Ellon Smith (XV 6). In 1766 William Crookshanks reports that lior hus- 
band, John Morrison, who li\'es near him, is doing very well. The Morrisons 
are neighbors of his, living within half-a-mile of him, in Middletomi, near 
Tynan, County of Armagh, Ireland, though he speaks of it elsewhere as in 
County Monaghan. Ellen Smith is reported by Mrs. Willson, in 1847, as hav- 
ing gone to America after 1766. 



144 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTERS. 

Jane Smith (XV 7). In 1759 William Crookshanks says that Jane Arm- 
strong and two of her children are living with her mother in Cleare, and says 
that John Armstrong is his malt-man at his malt-kiln in Cleare. They have 
three older children who are not at home, but are working at trades. They still 
lived there in 1760. 

Sarah Smith (XV 8). Her husband, William Crookshanks, gives in his 
letters to John Frazer, in 1759, and to Persifor Frazer, in 1766, the principal 
information that we have about the Smith family. He was a man of good 
estate and writes very well. In 1759 he says that he lives at Annagoola, having 
inherited his father's lands. His father, who was 90 years old, and his motiier, 
were then living close beside him. Upon the decease oif his father-in-law, Robert 
Smith, he bought that part of his estate in Cleare which did not come to him 
through his wife, Sarah Smith, but he feels aggrieved because his mother-in-law 
and her son-in-law, John Greason, differ with him as to his rights in the estate. 
He, however, is waiting for them to come to a better mind, and has given his 
mother-in-law a house, land and necessaries for her life in Cleare. He says he 
was compelled to pay a large price for the land in Cleare, but that he has posses- 
sion of the whole. His letters give the impression of a kindly courteous gentle- 
man. The relations between the Smith family and the Frazor family were 
very close. William Crookshanks in his letter to Persifor Frazer, May 19, 
1766, speaks in very warm terms of Jobi Frazer. William Crookshanks is 
spoken of in the later family records as Judge Crookshanks. He had in 1766 
one son and five daughters. His house was near Middletown in County Mona- 
ghan. His daughters, in 1759, were Mary, Nancy, Matty and Sally. 

Robert Smith (XV 9). William Crookshanks reports that he is married, 
lives in County Down, and is extremely well married. 

^Margaret II. Smith (XV 10). She writes to her imcle, John Frazer, in 
1 737. They had been very close friends. It is an affectionate letter. 

Thomas Smith (XV 11). He went to America with John Frazer. There 
was some difficulty between them in regard to which Margaret writes her regret 
and her mother's, says that her brother was but a child when he went and hopes 
that the alienation will soon pass, which it did, as is evidenced in Persifor 
Frazer's letter to John Frazer, June 2, 1737. Thomas afterward returned 
to Ireland, and seems to have angered the family, about 1750, by taking posses- 
sion of the lands of Clanickney and Caiien under a will which was declared 
fraudulent. The name here spelled Cauen has several spellings. 

We have some scraps of information about this family in Generation 
XVI. William Crookshanks speaks, in 1759, of his daiighters, Mary, Nancy, 
Matty and Sally, and. in 17(16. of having five daughters and a son. lie speaks 
also of children in the families of his wife's sisters as hereinbefore quoted; but 
there is not enough data to permit of carrying on the record of the family 
further than Generation XV. 



THE ROBERT SMITH FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE EGBERT SMITH FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



TItK ROBERT SMITH FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE EOBF.RT SMITH FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE WORRALL FAMILY. 



Dr. George Smith in his history of Delaware county says that the name 
"Worrall" is supposed to have been originally "Warel," and that those bearing 
it are supposed to be descended from Sir Hubert de Warel, Count d'Arlea, 
Provence, France, who fought and lost three sons at the battle of Hastings in 
1066. Dr. Thomas A. Worrall, who has made a study of his Worrall ancestry, 
assumes the truth of this account. He says that William I ennobled and en- 
riched Sir Hubert de Warel for bis bravery and his sacrifices, and made him 
large grants of land in Durham and ITorthumberland, where Hubert built a 
stately palace, the ruins of which are still visible. They are sketched in 
Young's History of Northumberland. They are four miles from ]\Iorpish and 
are built on solid rock on the banks of a stream, and at a considerable eleva- 
tion above it. 

The family has been traced through the intervening generations. A branch 
of the Northumberland family removed to Wales, fi'om the neighborhood of 
which John Worrall emigrated in 1682 to Pennsylvania. 

Gilbert Cope doubts the correctness of this origin of the family. His 
surmise is jjrobably right. 

There was a considerable emigration of persons named Worrall or Worrel 
to Pennsylvania upon its first settlement. They were mainly from the center 
and the west of England, from Berkshire and Cheshire, and were probably 
relatives, but their exact degrees of relatioushij) are not now discoverable. 
The Worralls with whom this nan-ative has most connection were fi'om Ches- 
hire. Dr. George Smith, the historian, of Delaware county, thought that 
the first John Worrell was from Berkshire, but later and more thorough 
study locates the head of our family where our family tradition places him 
in Cheshire. The Berkshire Worrel was another man. The home of the 
family seems to have been in or near Acton, a small to\\Ti 16 miles northeast of 
Chester, England. 

John and Elizabeth Worrall, of Acton, are the earliest progenitors of 
the family that have been traced. John purchased from William Pcnn 250 
acres of land in Pennsylvania. His great-great-grand-daughter, Mrs. William 
Morris (Frazer XVII 8), quotes the family tradition as holding that their 
home was at Mt. Pleasant in Cheshire. 

GENERATION XIII. 



INDBX 
NO. 


MEMBER OP FAMILY. CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. ' 


DEATH. RESIDENCH. 


XIII 

1 


John Worrall. 


Elizabeth. 


1618. 


about 1657. 


Sept. 4, 1703. 


Mt. Pleasant, Eng. 



John Woi-rall (XIII 1). His wife Elizabeth was buried in Cheshire, 
June 15, 1670. 

(145) 



14G 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTBA'. 
GENERATION XIV. 



INDES 
NO. 



MEMBEH OF F.t.MILY. 



BIRTH. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



XIV 

1 

o 
3 



John Worrall. 

Sarah Worrall. 
Peter Worrall. 



The Children of John Woeeall (XIII 1) and Elizabeth. 



I. Frances Taylor. 
II. Sarah Goodwin. 



Sept. IS. IteS. 1 I. Dec, 1G83. 




ill. Apr. 20,1714. 




Feb. 17, 1002. 1 


Apr. 11, 1687. 


Aug. 22. 1003. 





Edgmont Twp., Pa. 



John Worrall (XIV 1). His original certificate from Euglaud was dated 
July 16, 1683, and he probably emigTated soon after. He bought lands May 
22, 1682, from William Penn, but his first recorded appearance in America 
is on the records of Chester Monthly Meeting, Kovember 5, 1683, when he 
proposed marriage with Frances Taylor, widow of Thomas Taylor, of Worth- 
enbury, Flintshire, Wales. Thomas Taylor's purchase of 400 acres of land 
from William Penn was dated March 8, 1682. It lay immediately south 
of the tract of 250 acres purchased by John Worrall, of Acton, May 22, 1682, 
which was located in Middletown township, Chester (now Delaware) county, 
just southward of the Middletown Presbyterian church. Thomas Taylor died 
in England in 1CS2. 

Thomas Taylor left two sons, Thomas Taylor, born July 4, 1675, who 
married Kachel ^linshall, of Philadelphia, January 9, 1700, and died August 
15, 1705; and Philip Taylor, who was bom December 5, 1680, married Ann 
Conway, daughter of Thomas and Mary Conway, December 6, 1705, and died 
in Thorubury towTiship, in December, 1732. He was elected to the Assembly 
in 1715 and again in 1728. 

John and Frances Worrall settled on John's land in Middletown, but on 
February 15, 1685, John conveyed it to Richard Woodward, at the same time 
purchasing a tract of 387 acres in Edgmont, which subsequent surveys proved 
to contain 485 acres. To this property they removed, and on it John Worrall 
continued thereafter to live. 

John Worrall and Philip Worrall purchased September 12, 1G99, from 
Thomas Hart and others 1,000 acres of land in Chester county, and John 
Worrall purchased from Thomas and John Worrilow 250 acres of land in 
Edgmont, May 16, 1707. 

January 30, 1710, John Worrall advised Chester Meeting of his inten- 
tion to go to Great Britain, and requested a certificate from the meeting which 
was signed at the next meeting, March 25, 1710. John Worrall, of Edgmont, 
yoeman, executed a general power of attorney to John Salkeld and Joseph 
Selby to act in his place and assist his wife Frances Worrall to buy and seU 
"when she hath occasion." 

March 28, 1710, John Worrall, late of Acton, in the county of Chester, 
in Great Britain, b\it now of Edgmont, in the county of Chester, in the 



THE WOEKAI-L FAMILY. 147 

Province of Penusylvania, and Frances, his wife, of the one part and Richard 
Starkey, of Cogshall, in the connty of Chester in Great Britain, and Edward 
Gandy, of Frandly, in the said connty of Chester in Great Britain, of the 
second part, agree as to the conveyance of a messuage in Acton aforesaid, and 
all that meadow called Cliffe Meadow in Cranston, in the said county of 
Chester, Great Britain. 

At a monthly meeting held at Providence, December 29, 1712, John 
Worrall produced a certiiicate by Ephraim Jackson from Newton monthly 
meeting in Cheshire in Great Britain. At later periods John Worrall pur- 
chased lands in Middletown and in Upper Providence townships. 

Frances Worrall, who was born in 1644, died December 13, 1712. John 
Worrall who died Febraary 19, 1742, was reputed to be in his 85th year. His 
two last children were named for his parents, John and Elizabeth. 

His second wife, Sarah Goodwin, was a daiighter of Thomas and Eliza- 
beth Goodwin, of Edgmont. She was born about 1696, and died in 1755. She 
left by her will £100 to be given to her granddaughter, Mary Worrall Taylor, 
after the decease of Mary's mother. An account of her will be found in the 
Goodwin genealogy. 

Mrs. Persifor Frazer (Mary Worrall Taylor, XVI 3), who was one of 
John Worrall's grand-daughters, remembered that in her childhood there was 
a settlement of friendly Indians near Cheyney's Mills. They were quiet, 
peaceable and industrious. The women were basket-makers, and there were 
baskets of their manufacture in the household of Mrs. Frazer's mother, Sarah 
Worrall (XV 6), who was Mrs. John Taylor. The Indians were originally 
known as the Okekockings. In 1702 the Commissioners of Property directed 
the Surveyor of Chester county, Isaac Taylor (XIII 6), to lay out a tract of 
five hundred acres for their use forever. He located it in Vrillisto^vn to^vnship, 
Chester county, near what is now the southern boundary of the county. 

April 10, 1710, there was a gTeat gathering of Indians in that settlement, 
which was said to be "the greatest kno\vni these twenty years. It was about 
ten miles from John Worrall's at Edgmont." It was supposed to have relation 
to a contemplated attack upon the settlement by the French and the Five 
Xations of Indians, and was thought of sufficient importance to warrant an 
interview with the Indians by the Governor and Council. 

It was the habit of these Indians to go one« in three years to some point 
on the Susquehanna river to attend a "Cantico," and the "Susqiiehanna path" 
by which they traveled was still a well marked trail in the first quarter of the 
Xineteenth Century. In the middle of the Eighteenth Century the Indians 
went ofl^ to the triennial Contico from which they never returned. It is 
probable that they were intimidated by the excitement consequent upon the 
Indian atrocities in the country west of the Susquehanna river, which led 



148 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTEY. 

to the murder of the Conestoga Indians in Lancaster county by the Paxtoa 
boys in 1763. 

John Worrall's great-grand-daughter Mrs. William Morris (Martha 
Frazer XVI 8) said that when John Worrall went to live in Middletown, soon 
after his first marriage, the country was so infested by Indians that the family 
was often obliged to leave the house and sleep in the woods. 

She also said that when the family settled in MiddletowTi there were no 
grist mills in the region, and there was no means of grinding grain except by 
the use of hand mills. John Worrall's mill, she remembered, was said to hold 
half a bushel. 

John Worrall is remembered to have been a dictatorial man, though 
hospitable and kind hearted. There were many landless men in those days 
who were tram2>s, and as there were no inns, wayfarers' claims to be enter- 
tained were always considered. It was the rule in '"Friend Worrall's" house 
that bread and cheese should be set before every man who claimed to be 
hungry. If he cut the cheese unevenly his host required him to eat on until 
he squared it up again. 

John Worrall was a man of considerable means, and is credited with hav- 
ing loaned £100 to William Penn on one occasion when he needed the money. 
He was a man of strict integrity and of prominence and influence in his 
neighborhood. He served in the Provincial Assembly in 1717, and was a 
County Assessor in 1708. 

When his only son, by his first marriage, accidently met his death in 
1706, John Worrall was living in Willistowi^ to\\'nship, biit soon after he 
returned to his Middletown home. 

His descendants still occupy one of his farms in the neighborhood of 
Media, which he called "Mount Pleasant." It was originally surveyed to John 
Calvert, March 25, 1683. It contained 608^ acres, and was bought by John 
Worrall in 1739. It is bounded on the south by the north line of the borough 
of Media, and lies between Crum Creek on the east, and the Providence road 
on the west. His property in Middletown is close to the Middletown meeting 
house, John Worrall's garden and the meeting house gToimds having one com- 
mon wall. The meeting house groimds were originally a part of the farm. 

My grandmother, Mrs. Joseph Smith (]\Iary Frazer XVII 6), well remem- 
bered this garden as it was kept by her grand-uncles, John Worrall's sons, and 
among her earliest recollections was the beauty of the early spring flowers 
that grew from bulbs along the meeting house wall where the exposure was a 
sunny one. 

The garden was very large, and was celebrated for the beauty and the 
quantity of its flowers, among which were lilies-of-the-valley, white lilies, white 
English violets, hyacinths, tulips and rammculuses. The leaves of the white 
lily were in demand at that time for their medicinal qualities, and the sweet 
herbs, rosemary, lavender, etc., were cultivated by John Worrall, and distilled, as 
each well ordered household in those days manufactured its own perfumes. The 



THE WOERALL FAMILY. 



149 



whole establishment was on the scale of, and was similar in arrangement to, 
those of wealthy English farmers of that day. Some of the copper cooking 
utensils which were brought from England by John Worrall over two hundred 
years ago, are still in the possession of the family. 



GENERATION XV. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MABBIAGB. 


DEATH. 


RBSIDBNCB. 


The Children of John Worrall (XIV 1) and Frances Taylor. 


XV 
1 


1 

John Worrall. 


never married. 


Sept. 26, 1685. 




Feb. 8, 1706. 




The Children of John Worrall (XIV) and Sarah Goodwin. 



o 


Elizabeth Worrall. 


John Salkeld. 


Mar. 29, 1715. 


Jan. 13, 1732. 


1772. 




3 


Mary Worrall. 




June 27, 1717. 




in infancy. 




4 


Peter Worrall. 




Nov. 26, 1719. 




July 7, 1722. 




5 


John Worrall. 


I. Priscilla Lewis. 
II. Sarah Newlin. 


Nov. 26, 1719. 


I. Jun. 18,1741. 
II. Feb. 20,1771. 


Jan. 5, 1800. 


Edgmont, Del. Co. 




Sarah Worrall. 


I. John Taylor. 
II. John Peirce. 


Sept. 19, 1722. 


I. 1744. 
II. Dec., 1762. 


Apr. 23, 1780. 


Thornbury, Del Co. 


7 


Thomas Worrall. 




Nov. 21, 1724. 




in infancy. 




8 


Peter Worrall. 


.\bigail Pyle. 


1726. 


Apr. 27, 1757. 


1772. 


Middletown, 

Del. Co. 


9 


Thomas Worrall. 


JIary Peirce. 


July 29, 1728. 


1750. 


Feb. 3, 1S04. 




10 


Mary Worrall. 


Samuel Lewis. 


Feb. 24, 1731. 









John Worrall (XV 1) met an accidental death in his early manhood, 
being thrown from a wagon. 

The husband of Elizabeth Worrall (XV 2) John Salkeld was a maltster, 
of Chester, born December 12, 1709. He was a son of John Salkeld, Sr., and 
Agnes Powley, who was bom March, 1671, baptized March 25, 1671 at Cald- 
beck, Cumberland county, England. He communed in the Established Church in 
the year 1693, joined the Society of Friends about 1698, made religious visits 
to Ireland in 1698 and 1703, and to America in 1700. He married November 
8, 1704, at Greyrig in Westmoreland county, England, Agues Powley, daughter 
of Edmund Powley, of Whinfield, Westmoreland county, England. 

John Salkeld, Sr., emigrated to Penn.sylvania in 1705, lived in Chester, 
and died November 20, 1739, aged 67 years and 8 months. Agnes Powley 
was born in 1675, and died January 12, 1749, aged 73 years. 

John Worrall (XV 5). His first wife, Priscilla Lewis, was a daughter 
of Samuel Lewis, of Edgmont, and Phebe Taylor. The marriage of John 
Worrall and Priscilla Lewis was at Middletown, where at his death John was 
10 



150 THE SJIITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

buried. Phebe Taylor was a <laughter of Josiah Taylor. His second wife, 
Sarah Kewlin, was a daughter of John i^Tewlin, born Febniary 28, 1691, who 
married in 1711 Mary Woodward, of ^liddletown. John Newlin's father, 
Nathaniel Newlin, was born December 19, 1665, emigrated with his parents 
from Mt. Melick, Tyrone county, Ireland, in 1683, and settled in Concord 
township, Delaware county. He married, April 17, 1685, Mary Mendenhall, 
from Wiltshire. England. Nathaniel's father's name was Nicholas Newlin, a 
gentleman in easy circumstances in Ireland. 

Sarah Worrall (XV 6). For an account of her first husband, John Tay- 
lor, see Taylor genealogy. Sarah was, by her father's will, entitled to £100, 
and one-fourth of the residvie of his estate. Some controversy arose about 
the settlement, and Sarah's father-in-law, John Taylor (XIV 20), in a petition 
to William Plumsted, Register General, under date of December 1745, asks 
that the accounts of Thomas Cummings, John Salkeld and Cadwallader Evans, 
executors of the will of John Worrall, yeoman, should not be passed till he, 
John Taylor, can examine them. 

Sarah Worrall married a second time, John Peirce, a wealthy Quaker, 
but the marriage did not result happily, and in 1769 she left her husband's 
house and lived for a time with her daughter Mary — Mrs. Persifor Frazer. 
She apparently returned to her own home and seems to have been living there 
in 1777. There are extant several caustic letters from John Peirce relating to 
this estrangement, but nothing more serious than incompatibility of temper 
seems to have caused the quarrel. Sarah Worrall's death was caused by a 
stroke of apoplexy. She was in failing health the last few years of her life. 

John Peirce was a Quaker preacher. He was a grandson of Geoi'ge 
Pearce, of Winscom, Somersetshire, England, and Ann Gainer, of Thornbury, 
Gloucestershire, England, who were married Februai'y 1, 1679, and emigTated 
in 168-}:, sailing from Bristol, England. George Pearce took up in 1684, 490 
acres of land in Thornbury tOA\-nship, which township he named for his wife's 
old home. He was a member of Assembly in 1705, and was one of a company 
who built Concord Mill, the first mill in the neighborhood. He died in 1734. 
Of his sons, Joshua married Ann Mercer and Caleb man-icd Mary Walter. 
John Peirce who married Sarah Worrall (XV 6), and Mary Peirce who 
married Thomas Worrall (XV 9), were children of Caleb Peirce, the son 
of George Pearce. John Pierce's home was half way between the Frazer 
homestead and Chad's ford on the Brandywine. 

Peter Worrall (XV 8) remained at the Middletown homestead. He 
delayed his marriage for some time that he might not displace his mother 
as the head of the household. He was a man of large means. 

His wife Abigail Pyle, was a daughter of John and Rachel Pyle, of Ken- 
nett, and a great-gi-and-daughter of Robert Pyle, maltster of Bishop's Cannings, 
Wiltshire, England, emigi-ant about 1682, and Ann Stovey, of Hilperton, 



THE WOKKALL FAMILY. 151 

Wiltshire, England, who were married November 16, 1681, by Friend's 
ceremony. 

Eobcrt Pyle settled in Bethel and was a member of Assembly in 1688, 9, 
1690, 92, 95, 99, 1700, 1 and 5. Ann Stovey was a daughter of William Stovey 
who suffered persecution as a Quaker in 1677 and 1683. Ann died in 1724. 

His son Nicholas Pyle, Abigail's gTandfather, settled in Bethel, but 
removed later to Concord township. He was married in 1688 to Abigail 
Bushell. He died in 1717, his wife surviving him. He was a man of con- 
siderable property, a member of Assembly for six years, and one of the owners 
of the Concord mill. 

In 1767 one of the men of the AA^orrall family got into some trouble ^yith his 
wife. Persifor Frazer, September 9, 1767, asks Mary, his own wife, to try to 
reconcile them, but as her uncle seems to be in the right, not to let him make 
unreasonable acknowledgments. This was probably Peter Worrall. 

Abigail, the wife of Peter Worrall, survived him and married at iliddle- 
town, September 8, 1774, William Swaffer, of Chester, who was a son of 
William Swaffer, of Nether Providence, who in Augiist, 1694, married Mary 
Caldwell. November 30, 1789, Persifor Frazer, who had married Mary Wor- 
rall Taylor (XV 3), a niece of Peter Worrall's, complained to the overseer 
of the Chester Meeting that Peter Worrall's widow, who with Joseph Talbot 
was an executor of Peter Worrall's will, bad up to that time persistently 
neglected to pay his wife the legacy of £100 which her grandmother, bom Sarah 
Goodwin (XIY 5), the wife of the elder John Worrall, had left her. It should 
have been paid in accordance with the terms of the bequest upon the death of 
his wife's mother, Sarah Worrall, in 1780. Peter Worrall, who died in 1772, 
had been his mother's executor and his estate was very large and ample to 
pay all debts and legacies with which it was charged. Persifor Frazer pre- 
sented the matter to the overseer of the meeting "as a method less expensive 
and more friendly than an appeal to the Courts." 

There is some difficulty about the position in the family record of Peter 
Worrall. He has been assumed by some of the authorities to be the first of 
that name, who the record that I have followed says died in 1722; but I have 
taken the course that seems to me to fit best all the circumstances which are 
known to me. 

Thomas Worrall (XV 9). His wife, Mary Peirce, was of Concord, Dela- 
ware county. She was a daughter of Caleb Peirce and a grand-daughter of 
George Pcarce. She died July 1, 1806. 

Mary Worrall (XV 10). Her husband, Samuel Lewis, was a son or a 
nephew of Samuel Lewis, the father of Priscilla Lewis, who married John 
Worrall (XV 5). 



152 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 
GENERATION XVI. 



IKDBX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 

1 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


1 

RBSIDBNCa. I 




Tb 


E Childben of Elizabeth Worball (XV 


2) AND John Salkeld. 


i 

1 


XVI 

1 

2 


Sarah Salkeld. 
John Salkeld, 3d. 




June 29, 1733. 
June 2, 1735. 






Aug. 10. 1742. 
about 1820. 


New Brunswick, 

Canada. 
Concord, Del. Co. 

New Jersey. 


3 
4 
5 

6 


Agnes Salkeld. 
Mary Salkeld. 
Joseph Salkeld. 

Isaac Salkeld. 


Simon Guest. 

I. Esther Cobourn. 
II. Worrall. 
Marie Bockee. 


Mar. 15, 1737. 
Dec. 3, 1739. 
Jan. 10, 1742. 

July 24, 1743. 


Jan 


. 17. 1758. 
1770. 


Dec. 17, 1760. 
June 2.5. 1746. 
July 30, 1797. 


7 

8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 


Elizabeth Salkeld. 

Ann Salkeld. 
Sarah Salkeld. 

Thomas Salkeld. 
Samuel Salkeld. 
Peter Salkeld. 
James Salkeld. 


I. George Robinson. 
II. Derrickson. 
Joseph Larkin. 

IL Joseph Gill. 
Margaret Bishop. 


Dec. 31, 1745. 

Nov. 27, 1747. 
Mar. 9, 1750. 

Dee. 19, 1752. 
Jan. 24, 1754. 
Mar. 28, 1755. 
Mar. 28, 1755. 




1765. 


Sept. 27, 1835. 

Jan. 10, 1753. 
Jan. 4, 1759. 
Sept. 21, 1820. 
May 12, 1757. 


I. Newcastle Co., 

Del. 
Bethel, Del. Co. 




1 


Che Children of Johi 


« Wobball (XV 


5) 


and Pbiscilla Lewis. 





15 


Elizabeth Worrall. 


Abraham Hoopes. 




about 1765. 


May. 1817. 




16 


Mary Worrall. 


Robert Thompson. 




about 1764. 






17 


Samuel Worrall. 












18 


Lydia Worrall. 


Williams. 










19 


Isaac Worrall. 






about 1782. 







The Children of Sarah Worrall (XV 6) and John Taylor. 



Mary Worrall 



Isaac Taylor. 
Sarah Taylor. 



Taylor. 



Persifor Frazer. 

Elizabeth Townsend. 
James Thomson. 



Apr. 8, 1745. 

Oct. 18, 1747. 
Jan. 25, 1751. 



Oct. 2, 1766. 

1767. 
Feb. 28. 1768. 



Nov. 30, 1830. 

1781. 
Oct. 2, 1836. 



Thornbury, Del. Co. 
Norristown, Pa. 



The Children of Sabah Worrall (XV 6) and John Peibce. 



Mary Pel roe. 
John Peirce. 



John James. 
Elizabeth Myers. 



about 1764. 



about 1778. 



THE WOHEALL FAMILY. 
GENERATION XVI. 



153 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BIBTH. 



KBSIDENCB. 



The Children of Peter Wobrall (XV 8) and Abigail Ptle. 



John Worrall. 
Rachel Worrall. 
Sarah Worrall. 
Rachel Worrall. 
Abigail Worrall, 
Mary Worrall. 
Elizabeth Worrall. 



Hannah Thatcher. 

Levi Matson. 
Nehemiah Matson. 
Joseph Thatcher. 
Samuel Richards. 



Jan. 


31, 


1758. 


iNov. 


24. 


1759. 


Dec. 


Iti, 


1760. 


Jan. 


17, 


17(!3. 


Jan. 


2!1, 


176(5. 


Sept. 


27, 


1768. 


July 


25, 


1771. 



Apr. 12, 1780. 



Apr. 27, 1785. 
May 18, 1791. 



Jan. 3, 1760. 
June 26, 1810. 



Thornbury, Del. Co. 



The Children of Thomas Wobrall (XV 9) and Mart Peirce. 



32 


1 
Thomas Worrall. 


Ruth Pennell. 






Jan. 4, 1791. 


Feb. 26, 1798. 




33 


Peirce Worrall. 








never married. 






34 


Peter Worrall. 


Hannah Sharpless. 


May 


4, 1768. 


1810. 


May 28, 1831. 




35 


Sarah Worrall. 














36 


George Worrall. 


Jane Sermon. 




1769. 


Apr. 21, 1796. 


1845. 




37 


Mary Worrall. 















Joseph Salkeld (XVI 5). 
and Nellie Worrall. 



His second wife was a daughter of Joshua 



Isaac Salkeld (XVI 6). His wife was of Mne Partners, ISTew York. 

Ann Salkeld (XVI 8). Her husband, Joseph Larkin, born 1739, died 
August 13, 1826, was a son of John Larkin, a resident of Chichester, in 1724, 
and afterward a forgeman for John Taylor (XIV 15) of the Sanim Iron Works, 
in Thornbury, and Esther Shelley, daughter of Roger Shelley, of Chichester. 
They were married October 29, 1731. 



Mary Worrall (XVI 16). 
out of meeting. 



Acknowledged in 1765 that she had married 



(XVI 20, 21 and 22.) For an account of these persons see Taylor 
genealogy. 

Mary Peirce (XVI 18) was a girl of unusual beauty. At the age of 
fourteen she was persuaded to marry John James, a man of respectable con- 
nections, but of bad habits. She bore him fifteen children. He treated her 
badly, partly because her father, who had idolized her as a child, disowned her 
after her marriage. She finally had to be rescued from her husband by her 
half-sister, Mrs. Persifor Frazer. 



154- THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

The wife of -Tolui Pierce (XYI 24), Elizabeth Myers, was a daughter of 
John Myei's, and an aunt of Henry Myers, who, in 1812, married Elizabeth 
Frazer (XVII 10), daughter of Persifor Frazer. 

John Worrall (XVI 25). His wife, Hannah Thatcher, born September 
14, 1760, was a daughter of William and Sarah Thatcher, of Thorubury 
township. 

Abigail WoiTall (XVI 29). Her husband, Joseph Thatcher, was a son 
of William and Sarah Thatcher. 

Mary Worrall (XVI 30). Her husband, Sanniel Richards, was a son of 
Samuel and Hannah Richards, of Philadelphia. 

Peter Woi*rall (XVI 34). His wife, Hannah Sharpless, was born December 
18, 1777, and died June IS, 1858. She was a daughter of Daniel Sharpless, 
who was a son of Joseph Sharpless and Mary Pyle. Thev were married in 
1771. 



THE WOERALL FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE WORRALI. FAJIILY. 



NOTES. 



THE WOKRALL FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE WORRAI.I, FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE WORRILOW FAMILY. 

The name has several spellings. On the parish register of Haughton, 
England, which begins about 1570, it is spelled Warrilow. Later it is spelled 
Worrilaw and the spelling now is Worrilow. 

The name is not known except in this family. It seems to be of infrequent 
occurence. Lower, in his book of English surnames, does not mention it. 

Haughton is in Staffordshire, England, on the London and Northwestern 
Railway, about 40 miles southeast of Chester. In the time of the earliest 
records the family belonged to the Church of England, but in 1684 the names 
are found in the Friends' recoi-ds in Staffordshire. The descent of the family 
of Worrilows who were my ancestors, from Christopher Warrilow, is only 
inferential, but it seems probable. 

Christopher Warrilow, who was buried April 4, 1605, and Margery, his 
widow, who was buried in 1614 (the day being illegible), are the first persons 
of the name recorded. The family place was called Brasenhill or Brasnil. 
Thomas Worrilow called his place in Chester county Brooznoll, the names being 
evidently the same. 



'no^'^ member of family. consort. 

1 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


KBSIDENCB. 


GENERATION X. 


X 

1 


Christopher 

Warrilow. 


Marger.v ■ 






Apr. 4, 16ua. 





Margery Warrilow, widow, was buried 1614 (the day being illegible). 



GENERATION XI. 
The Children of Christopher Warrilow (X) and Maeoert. 



XI 












1 


Jane Warrilow. 


John Leigh. 


about 1600. 


Nov. 27, 1624. 




2 


Marie Warrilow. 


Ralph Lownes. 


about 1602. 


June 12, 1626. 




8 


John Warrilow. 


Alice. 


about 1604. 


about 1632. 


Mar. 20, 1634. 



The deaths of Jane (XI 1) and Marie (XI 2) and the marriage of John 
(XI 3) are not recorded in the Haughton parish register, having happened 
probaby in other parishes. 

John Warrilow is recorded as John Warrilow senior. It will be noted 
that he died more than two years before his younger son was baptized. 

Alice, the widow of John, is spoken of as "late of Brasenhill." She was 
buried November 28, 1691. 

153 



ISO 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 
GENERATION XII. 



INDBX 

HO. 



MEMBEB OF FAMILY. 



BAPTIZED. 



MARRIAGE. 



BESIDENCB. 



The Children of John Wabeilow (XI 3) and Alice. 



XII 
1 



John Warrilow. 
Thomas Warrilow. 



I. Joan Perkes or 

Grace. 
II. Susan Brightwen. 



Dec. 19, 1633. 
Dec. 26. 1636. 



I. Aug.17,1663. 
II. Feb. 27,1702. 



1G47. 
May, 1709. 



John Warrilow (XII 1) apparently died in England. 

Thomas Warrilow's wife is always mentioned as Grace in all records that 
are now extant. Grace died in Chester county, Pennsylvania, ahout 1700. It 
may have heen that Thomas Warrilow, having become a Quaker, thought it 
best about the time of his mother's death to take his rather large family to 
the new land of promise which the Quakers had taken up in Pennsylvania. 

In an agreement dated April 17, 1723, between John Taylor and the 
children of Thomas Worrilow, every one of them signs the name "Worrilaw," 
but the accepted form is now "Worrilow." The several Worrilow witnesses at 
the marriage of John Worrilow and Ann Maris, in 1690. all sign their names 
"Worrilaw." 

Dr. Smith, in his history of Delaware county, thinks that Thomas Worri- 
low was originally a resident of Yorkshire, England. Mrs. William Morris, 
who was a great-granddaughter of his granddaughter Mary Worrilow who 
married John Taylor (XIV 20), thought that Lincolnshire was the old home of 
the Worrilow family. Thomas called his place Brooznoll, which is supposed 
to have been the name of his English home. He was a Quaker, and he emi- 
gi'ated probably about the year 1688. His name is not on the list of taxables 
for Edgmont township for 1689, but both he and his son John appear on a 
similar list for 1693. He also appends his name as a freeholder to a certificate 
of the election of William Howell as a member of Council in 1690. He is 
ranked as a yeoman in the record of the marriage of his son, John Worrilow, in 
1690. Thomas Worrilow and John Worrall are the first and third .signers in 
a coroner's inquest on the body of Sarah Baker, "killed by the force of thunder," 
Edgmont, July 6, 1699. 

He settled in Edgmont township, in or before 1690, and probably lived 
there till after the death of his first wife. His place in Edgmont was in the 
western part of the township and contained 490 acres. He removed to Phila- 
delphia in 1701, and lived on the north side of Chestnut street, west of Third 
street, at the time of his death. 



THE WARRII.OW FAMILY. 



157 



One authentic relic of him remains — a massive arm chair of oak, with the 
inscription "T. W. 16SS," carved near the top of its back. It was, perhaps, 
brought over at the time of his emigration. It is now in the possession of Esther 
Aertsen (Smith XIX 181), who is a descendant of Thomas Worrilow. 

Susan Brightwen, his second wife, died in Philadelphia in 1710. 

GENERATION XIII. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Childben of Tuomas Wobeilow (XII 2) and Joan Perkes or Grace. 



XIII 
1 

o 

3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



John Worrilow. 
Thomas Worrilow. 
Walter Worrilow. 
Elizabeth Worrilow 
Marie Worrilow. 
Jane Worrilow. 
Grace Worrilow. 



.\nn Maris. 

William Beaks. 
Daniel Hoopes. 



Aug. 


9, 


16G4. 


Jan. 


2!*. 


1666. 


Apr. 


2«, 


1660. 


May 


15, 


1671. 


May 


25, 


1674. 


Sept. 


20, 


1675. 


Aug. 


22, 


1678. 



Oct. 


14, 


1690. 


Mar. 


5, 


1690. 


Dec. 


10, 


1696. 



1726. 



May 17, 1G84. 



Thomas Worrilow, of Brooznoll, in Edginont, deeds to John Worrilow, his 
son and heir, September 1, 1690, 250 acres of land on the southeast end of his 
tract in Edgmont, with half the barn and outhouses and half the improvements, 
in view of his approaching marriage to Aim Maris, and in consideration of 
£20, marriage portion, paid to the said John Worrilow. 

John Worrilow (XIII 1) was born in England. His name is found in 
the records of Delaware coimty in 1687. He was an active member of the 
Society of Friends, and in 1699 was a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly. 
His marriage to Ann Maris, in 1690, at the house of Bartholomew Coppock, 
is noted in the records of Chester Friends' Meeting, and the original certitieate 
of the marriage is still extant. His brother, Walter Worrilow, is a recording 
witness. 

He lived in Edgmont township where he fell heir to his father's estate of 
490 acres, was doubtless a farmer, and was, perhaps, also a manufacturer of 
linen, as on several occasions, in 1721 and afterward, his son-in-law, John 
Taylor, notes that he has sold him his whole crop of hemp. 

He is said to have been a more active Friend than his father was. 

He owned, from 1701 to 1704, the house at the southwest corner of Third 
and Edgmont streets, Chester, Pennsylania. 

His wife, Ann Maris, was a daughter of George Maris. (See Maris 
Genealogy.) 

Walter Worrilow (XIII 3). His name appears in the records of the time 
but nothins noteworthv is recorded of him. 



158 THE SMITH COLLATEEAL ANCESTET. 

Elizabeth Worrilow (XIII 4). Her husband, William Beaks, was certi- 
fied from Falls Meeting before his marriage. 

Jean Worrilow (XIII C) and William Collet, of Chichester Meeting, "de- 
clared their intentions" the second time March 4, 1695, but the marriage was 
prevented by his death, and she married Daniel Hoopes in the next year. 

It is noteworthy that Marie Worrilow (XIII 5) and Jane Worrilow 
(XIII 0) were named for their grand aunts. 

The husband of Jean Worrilow (XIII 6), Daniel Hoopes, was the oldest 
son of Joshua Hoopes, of Skelton, Yorkshire, Yeoman (son of John and Isabel 
Hoopes, of Moorsom, Yorkshire), who was a cornet of cavalry in the Army of 
the Parliament, in the middle of the Seventeenth Century. Joshua emigrated 
from Cleveland, Yorkshire, in the ship Providence, Kobert Hopper, Master, 
with his wife Isabel, and children, Daniel, Margaret and Christian, arriving 
in Pennsylvania Xovember 10, 1(383. He settled in Makefield, Bucks county, 
and died in 1724. His wife died April 15, 1084. Joshua brought a certificate 
from Friends at Rowsby, "that he was bom at Skelton, of honest parents, and 
that his people were of account." He is said to have not been a Quaker in 
1677, but later identified himself with that society. 

His son, Daniel Hoopes, was born in Yorkshire, in 1668. He was married 
at a meeting held at John Bowater's house, in MiddletowTi, Delaware County. 
In 1097 he bought 300 acres of land in WesttoA\Ti, and in 1098, 175 acres more, 
on which he settled. He was a member of Assembly in 1708 and 1709. He 
was living in 1740 ; the date of his death is not known. After his marriage, in 
1696, he removed from Bucks county to Westtown, Chester county, settling on 
property recently owned by Elwood Hoopes. His descendants are very numer- 
ous, as they well might be, he having started the family with seventeen children. 
Of these only three died Ijefore reaching the age of twenty-one, and only one 
of the remaining fourteen remained unmarried. These fourteen lived to an 
average age of nearly seventy-two years. Eight of them lived to be over eighty 
years old, and the youngest passed the age of ninety-two. This is a record of 
vitality that is rarely excelled. His first child was born 1697, 'he last died 
1815, so that his family of children extended over 118 years. 



THE WOREILOW FAMILY. 
GENERATION XIV. 



159 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBBE OP FAMILY. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


EESIDBNCB. 






The Children of John Worrilow (XIII 


1) 


AND Ann Maris 






XIV 
1 


Mary Worrilow. 


I. Joseph Baker, Jr. 


Jan. 


9, 


1692. 


I. May 18. 1709 


about 


1733. 


Thornbury, Del. Co. 






II. John Taylor. 








II. Sept. 


10,1718 










J2 


Walter Worrilow. 


not married. 


Mar. 


12, 


1696. 














Thornbury, Del. Co. 


3 


Alice Worrilow. 


Peter Yarnall. 


May 


0, 


16'JS. 






1715. 








Willistown, 

Chester Co. 


4 


Sarah Worrilow. 


Nicholas Pyle. 


July 


12, 


1700. 


Dec. 


7, 


1721. 








Concord, Del. Co. 


5 


Thomas Worrilow. 


Susanna Taylor. 


Apr. 


It;, 


1702. 






1726. 










6 


Anne Worrilow. 


not married. 


May 


31, 


1705. 














Thornbury, Del. Co. 


7 


Jane Worrilow. 


George Whippo. 


June 


23, 


1707. 


July 


23, 


1726. 








Willistown, 

Chester Co. 


8 


Grace Worrilow. 


Jacob Taylor. 


Aug. 


9, 


1710. 


Oct. 


13, 


1728. 


about 


1745. 




T 


HE Children of Jean 


Worrilow (XIII 3) 


AND Daniel Hoopes. 




9 


Grace Hoopes. 


William Paschall. 


Sept. 


1", 


1697. 


Apr. 


21, 


1720. 


July 


3, 


1721. 


Whiteland, 

Chester Co. 


10 


Ann Hoopes. 




Dec. 


23, 


1698. 








May 


13, 


1704. 




11 


Mary Hoopes. 


Philin Yarnall. 


Nov. 


22 


1700. 


Apr. 


24, 


1720. 






1765. 


Edgmont, Del. Co. 


12 


Hannah Hoopes. 


never married. 


July 


2.5,' 


1702. 












1750. 




13 


Joshua Hoopes. 


Hannah Ashbridge. 


June 


29. 


1704. 


Apr. 


s, 


1731. 


Oct. 


9, 


1769. 


Westtown. 

Chester Co. 


14 


Jane Hoopes. 


George Ashbridge. 


July 


14, 


1706. 


Oct. 


21, 


1730. 


Jan. 


31. 


1789. 


Goshen, Chester Co. 


15 


Ann Hoopes. 


never married. 


Feb. 


3, 


1708. 








Sept. 


14. 


1728. 




16 


Daniel Hoopes. 


Alice Taylor. 


Dec. 


27, 


1710. 


Jan. 


27, 


1731. 


June 


5, 


1790. 


Goshen, Chester Co. 


17 


John Hoopes. 
Abraham Hoopes. 


Christian Reynolds. 


Oct. 


17, 


1711. 


Oct. 


20, 


1743. 


Mar. 


1, 


1795. 


Goshen, Chester Co. 


18 


Mary Williamson. 


June 


12, 


1713. 


Feb. 


28, 


1733. 


Sept. 


5, 


179.5. 


Edgmont, Del. Co. 


19 


Thomas Hoopes. 


Susanna Davies. 


Dec. 


22, 


1714. 


Nov. 


13. 


1741. 


May 


21, 


1803. 


Goshen, Chester Co. 


20 


Elizabeth Hoopes. 


William Webb. 


Mar. 


13, 


1716. 


Nov. 


23. 


1732. 


Dec. 


9, 


1803. 


Kennet, Chester Co. 


21 


Stephen Hoopes. 


Martha Evans. 


Mar. 


13, 


1716. 












1767. 


Westtown, 

Chester Co. 


22 


Nathan Hoopes. 


Margaret Williamson. 


Mar. 


16. 


1718. 


Oct. 


6. 


1737. 


Feb. 


19. 


1803. 


E. Bradford, 

Chester Co. 


23 


Walter Hoopes. 




Mar. 


11, 


1719. 








Dec. 


9. 


1719. 




24 


Sarah Hoopes. 


George Hall. 


July 


25. 


1720. 








July 


23, 


1794. 




25 


Christian Hoopes. 


Daniel Webb. 


Oct. 


30, 


1723. 








Dec. 


31, 


1815. 


Kennet, Chester Co. 



Mary Worrilow (XIV 1). Her first husband was Josopli Baker, Jr. Xo 
member of the Baker family was an ancestor of ours, but their history is so 
interwoven with ours, that a notice of the earlier generation is here inserted. 

The earliest member of the family whose name is known is John Baker, 
Sr., of Shropshire, England, who died at Edgmont, in that country, February 
25, 1G72. His sons, Joseph and John Baker, were emigrants perhaps as early 
as 1681 from the Royal Manor of Edginond, Shropshire. 

Joseph Baker, with Mary, his wife, settled, about the year 1684, in Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, and named the township where he made his home after 



160 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTEY. 

his birthplace, Edgmont. He was an influential citizen, representing Chester 
county in the Pennsylvania Assembly in 1701, 1703, 1706, 1710, 1711 and 
1713, and filling various other offices. His will is dated Febriiary 19, 1715, 
proved September 24, 1716. He left children: 

(1) Joseph Baker, born December 11, 1686, who, May 18, 1709, married 
Mary Worrilow, and died March '2, 1717. His father left him in his will 
twenty shillings, having in his life time given him his portion of the estate. 

(2) Sarah Baker, who, October 26, 1710, married Thomas Smedley, who 
was a son of George Smedley, born in Derbyshire, England, who came to Penn- 
sylvania about 1682 and married, in 1686, Sarah Goodwin, widow of George 
Smedley's friend, John Goodwin. Sarah's maiden name was Kitchin. She 
was a daughter of Thomas Kitchin, of Dublin to\vnship, Pennsylvania, who 
emigrated, about 1684, from Derbyshire, England. 

(3) Kobert Baker, who married Susanna Packer. His father left him £5. 

(4) John Baker, to whom his father left the remainder of his land in 
Thornbury township, after substracting that which he gave to his son Joseph. 
He also left John his land in Edgmont township, amounting to 500 acres. 

The first husband of Mary Worrilow (XIV 1), Joseph Baker, Jr., was, 
as before said, the oldest child of Joseph and Mary Baker. He settled in 
Thornbury toAvnship near what is now Glen Mill's Station on the Central Divi- 
sion of the P. B. and W. R. R. His death occurred March 2, 1717. His 
widow and Isaac Taylor, of Thornbury, were his Executors. Isaac's son, John, 
married the widow, who was his senior by five years, and in this way the Thorn- 
bury farm came into the Taylor family, where it remained for nearly two 
centuries. Before marrying, John Taylor and Mary Baker gave, at Concord 
Meeting, an instrument dated Chichester, Septeml>er 1. 1718, to pay to the child 
(Joseph Baker, 3d), who was born after his father's death, £30. (For John 
Taylor, the second husband of Mary Worrilow, see Taylor Genealogy.) 

Walter Worrilow (XIV 2) was a fanner of Thornbury township, and 
Avas living in October, 1730, biit nothing is known of his history. 

The husband of Alice Worrilow (XIV 3), Peter Yarnall, born October 
20, 1690, was the second son of Francis Yarnall, of Stone Creek Head, and 
Hannah Baker, of Edgmont, who were married in 1686, and lived for some 
time in Springfield township. Francis died in Willistown township in 1721. 
His son, Peter, was living in Willistown in 1723. 

The husl)and of Sarah Worrilow (XIV 4), Xicholas Pyle, was the oldest 
son of Xicholas Pyle, emigi-ant, who married, in 1688, Abigail, daughter of 
Joseph Bushell. He settled in Bethel township, Delaware county, but removed 
thence, alwut 1696, to Concord township. The younger Xicholas was bom 
April 26, 1697. He was living in Concord in 1723, where he died in 1734. 



THE WORltlLOW FAMILY. 161 

Thomas Worrilow (XIV 5) condemns himself for marrying out of Meet- 
ing, October 30, 1727. 

Jane Worrilow (XIV 7) was testified against for marrying out of 
Meeeting, January 30, 1727. 

The husband of Grace Worrilow (XIV 8) was the second son of Isaac 
Taylor and Martha Roman. (See Taylor Genealogy.) 

The husband of Mary Hoopes (XIV 11), Philip Yaniall, l)orn No- 
vember 29, 1696, died eleventh or twelfth month, 1758, was the second son 
of Philip Yarnall and Dorothy Baker, who were married in 1694, and lived 
in Edgmont township. The elder Philip died in 1734, and his widow died 
in 1743. 

The wife of Joshua Hoopes (XIV 13), Hannah Ashbridge, and the 
husband of Jane Hoopes (XIV 14), George Ashbridge, were children of 
George Ashbridge, emigrant, and Mary Malin. The elder George Ashbridge 
reached Philadelphia in 1698, but lived afterward in Edgmont township. 
They were married October 23, 1701. Mary died April 15, 1728, and George 
died in 1748. 

Hannah Ashbridge was born April 26, 1715. 

George Ashbridge, the younger, was born December 19, 1704, and died 
March 6, 1773. 

The wife of Daniel Hoopes (XIV 16), Alice Taylor, was a daughter 
of Abiah Taylor, Jr., who married, April 18, 1694, at Faringdon Meet- 
ing, Berkshire, England, Deborah Gearing, daughter of John Gearing, of 
Stanford-in-the-Vale, Berkshire. They settled in East Bradford township, 
Chester county, in 1702, where Abiah died about 1747. Abiah Taylor, Jr., 
was a son of Abiah Taylor, of Didcott, Berkshire, England. 

The wife of John Hoopes (XIV 17), Christian Reynolds, was a daugh- 
ter of Francis Reynolds, son of Henry Reynolds, who was born in England 
in 1655, emigrated in 1676, and settled in Burlington, New Jersey. He 
married, in 1678, Pi-udence Clayton, of Chichester, Pennsylvania. He re- 
moved to Chichester, and died there in 1724. His son, Francis, inherited 
from his father a farm of 290 acres in Nottingham township, Chester county. 
Francis married, in 1712, Elizabeth Acton, of Salem, New Jersey, and set- 
tled in Chichester township, where he died in 1760. 

The wife of Abraham Hoopes (XIV 18), Mary Williamson, was a 
daughter of John Williamson, bom September 11, 1690, a minister of the 
Society of Friends, and Sarah Smedley, who lived at Newtown, Delaware 



102 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 



County. John's parents were Daniel Williamson and Mary Smith. Daniel 
emigrated in 1682, married in 1685, and settled at Newtown, Dtlaware 
county. He died in 1727, while he was a member of Assembly. 

The husband of Elizabeth Hoopes (XIV 20), William W^ebb, born Jan- 
uary 13, 1711, was a son of William Webb, who married, March 22, 1710, 
Kebecca Harlan, and died about 1753. He settled in Kennet township, Ches- 
ter county, was a Justice, and for some years a member of Assembly. His 
father was Richard Webb, who emigrated from Gloucester, England, to Phil- 
adelphia in 1700, settled in Birmingham township, and died in 1719. 

The wife of Stephen Hoopes (XIV 21), Martha Evans, was a daughter 
of Evan Evans, of the parish of Treeglws, Montgomeryshire, Wales, who emi- 
grated in 1722, and settled in Uwchlan township. 

Nathan Hoopes (XIV 22) married, at Middletown Meeting, Margaret, 
daughter of Thomas Williamson, of Edgmont. 

The husband of Sarah Hoopes (XIV 24), George Hall, was a son of 
Samuel Ilall, of Kennet township, who died in 1738. This daughter out-did 
her mother^ as she had twenty-four children. 

GENERATION XV. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



MAKHIAGE. 



KESIDENCE. 



The Children of Mary Wormlow (XIV 1) and Joseph Baker. Jr. 



XV 






1 


Sarah Baker. 


Isaac Stro<le. 


2 


Hannali Baker. 


Joseph Talbot. 


3 


Joseph Baker. 3(i. 


Mary Chamberlin. 



1717. 



Mar. S, 1741. 

1732. 

Apr. 30, 1740. 



before 1776. 



The Children of Mary Worrii.ow (XIV 1) and John Taylor. 



4 


Isaac Taylor. 


Helena Stevenson. 


1719. 


Jan., 1742. 


Nov., 1745. 


Chichester, Pa. 


5 


John Taylor. 


Sarah Worrall. 


1721. 


1744. 


1761. 


Thornbury Twp., I'a. 


G 


Philip Taylor. 


Mary Riley. 




Oct. 20, 1748. 


1754. 


Tbornbury Twp., Pa. 


7 


Jacob Taylor. 












8 


Martha Taylor. 


William Empson. 




Nov. 23, 1738. 




Wilmington, Del. 


9 


Mary Taylor. 


never married. 











The Children of Thomas Worrilow (XIV 5) and Susanna Taylor. 



10 John Worrilow. Phoebe 



about 17.54. 



Concord Twp., Pa. 



THE WAERILOW FAMILY. 
GENERATION XV. 



103 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



KIRTH. 



MARRIAGE. 



RESIDENCE. 



The Children op Grace Wobrilow (XIV 8) and Jacob Taylor. 



Israel Taylor. 
Isaac Taylor. 

Thomas Taylor. 
Jacob Taylor. 
Joseph Taylor. 
James Taylor. 
Hannah Taylor. 
Ann Taylor. 
Mary Taylor. 



Beaumont. 

I. Eleanor Devon. 

II. Lydia Taylor. 

Dutton. 



J George Taylor. 
Young. 



about 1730. 



about 1745. 



before 1800. 



Concord Twp., Pa. 



Sarah Baker (XV 1). Her husband, Isaac Strode, was probably a gTand- 
son of Greorge Strode, grocer, of Milbrook, Southampton, Enghmd, who bought 
500 acres of land from William Penn, July 25^ 1682 ; emigrated shortly 
after aud settled in Concord township. He had a son, George Strode, of East 
Bradford to'miship, Chester county, who died about 1757. 

The husband of Hannah Baker (XV 2), Joseph Talbot, was a son of 
John and Elizabeth Talbot. John Talbot, in 1718, purchased 98 acres of 
land in JMiddleto^\^l township, where he died in 1721. His widow Elizabeth 
married prior to June 30, 1724, Hugh Bowen, who was not a Quaker. Joseph 
Talbot inherited his father's farm, and built a mill thereon, which was lately 
owned by Humphrey Yearsley. Joseph Talbot married AugTist 22, 1776, Mrs. 
Jfanny Sharpless. 

Joseph Baker, 3d (XV 3), was a posthumous child. His wife, Mary 
Chamberlin, lx)m June 1, 1723, was a daughter of John Chamberlin, of 
Thornbury, born December 1, 1692, who married at Concord Meeting, Decem- 
ber 21, 1721, Lettice, daughter of Moses Key, and died in 1782. His home 
was in Aston township. John Chamberlin's father was Robert Chamberlin, 
of Marlborough, Wiltshire, England, who, after emigration, settled in Concord 
township. After the death of Joseph Baker 3d his widow married Andrew 
McCoy. 

For an account of the children of Mary Worrilow (XIV 1) and John 
Taylor; and of Grace Worrilow (XIV 8) and Jacob Taylor see Taylor Gene- 
alogy. 

John Worrilow (XV 10) was testified against November 26, 1759, for 
marrying out of Meeting and enlisting in the army. His wife's (Phoebe) will 
is dated 1803. 





164 


THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 








GENERATION XVI. 




INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER or FAMILT. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. DEATH. 


BESIDBNCB. 




The Ciiildken of Hann.\u Bakeb (XV 2) and 


Joseph Talbot. 


XVI 
















1 


Margaret Talbot. 


Thos. Griswold. 












2 


Mary Talbot. 


Uobert Rogers. 












3 


Joseph' Talbot. 


Hannah Pennell. 






1762. 


July 22, 1807. 


Chichester, Del. Co. 


4 


Martha Talbot. 


Daniel Broomall. 






1761. 


May 31, 1812. 


Thombury, Del. Co. 


5 


John Talbot. 


Sarah Levis. 








Jan. 20, 1820. 


Chichester, Del. Co. 


6 


Rachel Talbot. 


Francis Townsend. 


Nov. 27, 1745. 


July 8, 


1762. 


Sopt. 22. 1784. 


E. Bradford, 

Chester Co 


7 


Jacob Talbot. 


Susanna Sharpless. 


Oct. 19, 1748. 


Nov. 22, 


1770. 


Dec. 4, 1831. 


Richmond, Ind. 


8 


Elizabeth Talbot. 


I. Isaac Sharpless. 




Feb. 13, 


1777. 




Fayette Co., Pa. 






II. Rees Cadwallader. 




Sept. 1, 


1790. 






9 


Hannah Talbot. 


Francis Button. 


17.57. 






Sept. 22, 1824. 




10 


Susanna Talbot. 


Nathan Pennell. 


about 1754. 






Oct. 16, 1816. 


Chichester. 




Toe Children of Joseph Bakeb, 3d (XV 3) and 


Mart Chambeblin. 


11 


John Baker. 












Prince Edward's 
Island. 


12 


Lettice Baker. 


Richard Barnard. 


Dec, 1740. 


Mar. 16, 


1763. 


.\ug. 17, 1821. 


Newlin, Chester Co 


13 


Mary Baker. 


unmarried. 












14 


Elizabeth Baker. 


Thomas Brown. 




Jan. 30, 


1783. 








The Children of John Worrilow (XV 10) 


and Phoebe. 


15 


Thomas Worrilow. 


Hannah Dickinson. 


Feb. 13. 175.5. 






1 i 


16 


Joseph Worrilow. 




Nov. 3, 175(5. 


Feb. 13, 


1777. 


Mar. 4. 1778. 




The husband of Martha Talbot (XVI 4), Daniel Broomall, who was born 




1728, and died A])ril 2, 1S17, was a sou of John 


Broomall, who married, 




October 12, 1720, Anna Lewis, born in Philadelphia 


; and a gi-andson of John 




Broomall, who came to Pennsylvania in 1682, settled in Ed^iont township, | 




or in Lower Providence, and died in 1729. His wife' 


s name was Marv. Daniel 




Broomall owned a large farm on Chester Creek. 






John Talbot (XVI 5) was the wealthiest man in Chester or Delaware 




counties. His wife was a prominent Friend, and visited England and other 




foreign countries on a religious mission. 






The husband of Rachel Tall)ot (XVI 6), Francis Townsend, was a son | 




of Joseph ''. 


fownsend, Jr., who 


was born Jut 


le 8, 17 


L5, an 


il married, May 17. 



THK WORKILOW FAMILY. 



165 



1739, J.ydia Reynold?. The i'athor of Joseph, Jr., was Joseph Townsend, 
bom Jannai-y 18, 1685, in IJucklcberry, IJerkshire, England, son of William 
and Mary Townsend, of that place. Joseph married, November 27, 1710, 
Martha Woodorson, daughter of Julian and Esther Woodcrson. He emigrated 
in 1712, and lived after 1725 in East Bradford township. Joseph died June 
9, 1766, and Martha, May 2, 1767. 

John Eakcr (XVI 11) went to Prince Edward's Island to live. 

The husband of Lettice Baker (XVI 12), Richard Barnard, was a son of 
Richard Barnard and Ann Taylor, of Nowlin township, Chester county, Pa. 
He married, first, March 8, 1754, Susanna, daughter of David and Winnifred 
Eckhoff, of Newlin. Lettice Baker was his second wife. 

The wife of Thomas Worrilow (XVI 15), Hannah Dickinson, was a 
daughter of Benjamin and Isabel Dickinson. She died September 22, 1824, 
aged 67. 

Mary Worrilow, probably a daughter of John Won'ilow (XV 10), 
married. May 11, 1797, Thomas Hinkson, son of John and Jane Ilinkson, 
who emigrated from Ireland probably as early as 1764. Jane brought a certifi- 
cate from Cootehill, Ireland, dated May 30, 1764. They bought land in Provi- 
dence to%vnship March 20, 1764. John Ilinkson, in a deed from Charles 
Norris, is styled "of Philadelphia.'" The Hinkson family was originally of 
Hanoverian origin ; they emigrated in the seventeenth century to County Cavan, 
Ireland, whence John and Jane came, bringing Thomas with them. 



11 



THE WORRILOW FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE WORRILOW FAMILY. 



NOTKS. 



THE WORRII.OW FAMTI-Y. 



NOTES. 



THE WORRILOW FAMII.T. 



NOTES. 



THE GOODWIN FAMILY. 

GENERATION XIII. 



INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OF TAMILT. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


XIII 

1 

2 


John Goodwin. 
Thomas Goodwin. 


Sarah Kitchin. 
Elizabeth. 


about 1650. 


about 1680. 
about 1680. 


about 1685. 


Esgairgoeh, Wales. 
Kdgmont, Del. Co. 



Lower says the name Goodwin is of Teutonic origin. It is the same 
name as Godwin, and is common in Domesday Book. 

John Goodwin (XIII 1) remained in Wales. His home was at Esgair- 
goeh, a village eight miles from Llanidloes, Montgomeryshire. He was a 
minister of the Society of Friends, and he and his wife were highly esteemed, 
having bnilt a meeting house at their own expense, on ground purchased by 
them for that purpose. His wife, born Sarah Kitchin, was a daughter of 
Thomas Kitchin, of Dublin. After his death she came to Chester county, and 
married Thomas Smedley, born in Derbyshire, who came to Pennsylvania in 
1682. Thomas Kitchin's son, Thomas Kitchin, married Sarah Baker, 
daughter of Joseph Baker, of Edgmont township, Delaware county. Pa., in 
168(!. 

Thomas Goodwin (XIII 2) came to this country about 1708 to avoid 
persecution in North Wales, his home having been at Llandewi Brefi, in Car- 
diganshire. He presented his certificate of membership to Chester Monthly 
Meeting, February 28, 1709. John, the oldest of his children, remained in 
North Wales. The wife of Thomas, to whom he was married in Wales, bom 
in 1652, died November 10, 1739, in her 87th year. He settled, after arriving 
in Pennsylvania, first in Edgmont township, Delaware county, on land lately 
owned by Everett Passmorc. The Chester Meeting records call him "Thomas 
of Concord," and also "Thomas of Edgmont." He was taxed in Middletown 
in 1715 and 1725. 

GENERATION XIV. 







The Children of Thomas Goodwin 


XIII 1) AND Elizabeth. 




INDEX 
NO. 


MEMBER OP PAMILT. 


CONSORT. 


BIRTH. 


MARRIAGE. 


DEATH. 


RESIDENCE. 


XIV 

1 

2 
3 
4 


Mary Goodwin. 
Elizabeth Goodwin. 
Thomas Goodwin. 
Sarah Goodwin. 


Thomas James. 
Peter Thomas. 
Ann Jones. 
John Worrall. 


1694. 
about 1696. 


Oct. 21, 1712. 

1711. 

Nov. ]2. 1729. 

June 9. 1714. 


1775. 
Aug. 23, 1730. 
Apr. 16, 1775. 

17.55. 


Willistown, 

Chester Co. 
Willistown, 

Chester Co. 
Goshen Twp., 

Chester Co. 
Edgmont. Del. Co. 



167 



168 THE SMITH COI^LATEKAL ANCESTEY. 

Mary Goodwin (XIV 1) was a Quaker preacher, and visited England and 
Wales, 1754-1758, in that capacity. She was married in Middletown Meet- 
ing. Her husband, Thomas James, died in April, 1752. He left his farm to 
his son-in-law, Richard Battin, charged with Mary James' maintenance. 

The husband of Elizabeth Goodwin (XIV 2), Peter Thomas, was a son 
of Peter Thomas and Sarah Stedman, both of Springtown, Chester county, 
who married, April 16, 1686, and settled in WillistowTi to\vnship, where 
Peter, Sr., died June 5, 1722. Sarah Stedman's father was Jacob Stedman. 

Thomas Goodwin (XIV 3), in his capacity of minister of the Society of 
Friends, paid religious visits to New England in 1755, to Maryland and to 
the lower counties, now the State of Delaware, in 1758 and 1759, and to the 
other neighboring provinces. He went on similar business to England in 1763, 
and returned in 1764. In 1768 his duties called him to Ireland, and after his 
return he devoted himself largely to visiting persons who held slaves, to con- 
vince them of the wrongfulness of so doing. In 1749 he settled on a farm 
of 230 acres in East Goshen township, west of the General Greene tavern, 
which has ever since remained in the family. His wife, Ann Jones, was a 
daughter of Eichard Jones, of Goshen township. They were married at 
Newtown. 

Sarah Goodwin (XIV 4) was, after htr marriage, a Quaker preacher, or 
as they called it among themselves "A public Friend." In this capacity she 
twice visited England and Ireland. The first of these visits was in 1724, the 
Chester Monthly Meeting accrediting her for the work February 24, 1724. 
On her second visit she was accompanied by Elizabeth Ashbridge, who died at 
Waterford, Ireland. Sarah Worrall continued her journey to Cork, and in 
visiting a part of that city where there was great poverty and destitution, took 
a contagious disease then prevailing — supposed to have been small-pox — and 
died there. She was married in Middletown Meeting. She made her will 
November 28, 1750, being then "weak of body but of perfect mind and mem- 
ory." It disposed of a considerable quantity of silverware, and shows her 
to have been fairly well-to-do. 

The whole of this generation of the Goodwin family were Quaker 
preachers. 



THE GOODWIN FAMII.Y. 
GENERATION XV. 



161t 



MBtlBBB OP FAMILY. 



BIRTH. 



MABBIAOE. 



BBSIDINCB. 



The Children of Maby Goodwin (XIV 1) and Thomas James. 



sv. 
1 


John James. 


Ann Baker. 


Sept. 


16, 


1713. 


Dec. 


11, 


1735. 


1750. 


Willistown Twp., 

Chester Co. 


2 


Thomas James. 


Elizabeth Baker. 


Feb. 


14, 


1715. 






1737. 




3 


Joseph James. 




Nov. 


9, 


1717. 






1735. 






4 


Benjamin James. 




Dec. 


11. 


1720. 












5 


Isaac James. 




Julv 


19, 


1725. 












« 


Elizabeth James. 


Richard Battin. 








Sept. 


14, 


1746. 







The Children of Elizabeth Goodwin (XIII 2) and Peter Thomas. 



7 


Jacob Thomas. 


I. Katharine Jones. 
II. Rebecca Walker. 


Jan. 12, 


1711. 


I. Jan.29,1735. 
II. Mayl9,1742. 


Dec. 


11, 


1789. 


Coventry. 

Chester Co. 


S 


Sarah Thomas. 


Christian Vore. 


Sept. 2, 


1713. 


Mar. 2, 1737. 










9 


Peter Thomas. 


Margaret Taylor. 


Nov. 19, 


1715. 


Apr. 14. 1742. 










10 


John Thomas. 


Rebecca Jones. 


Oct. 7, 


1717. 


Apr. 30, 1747. 










11 


Thomas Thomas. 




Oct. 13, 


1719. 




Jan. 


14, 


1720. 




12 


Isaac Thomas. 


Mary Townsend. 


June 21, 


1721. 


May 16, 1745. 


Jan. 


19, 


1802. 


Willistown Twp., 

Chester Co. 


13 


Elizabeth Thomas. 


William Lewis. 


Mar. 11, 


1723. 


Oct. 9, 1747. 










14 


Mary Thomas. 


Samuel Deavcs. 


Nov. 23, 


1724. 


Nov. 14, 1744. 










15 


Rachel Thomas. 


William Trego. 


Oct. 13, 


1726. 


1753. 








Honeybrook Twp., 

Chpster Co 


16 


James Thomas. 


Deborah Walker. 


Dec. 29, 


1727. 


Dec. 16, 1758. 








Warrington, 

York Co., Pa. 


17 


Lydia Thomas. 




Aug. 15. 


1730. 











The Childben of Thomas Goodwin (XIV 3) and Ann Jones. 



18 
19 
20 


John Goodwin. 

Thomas Goodwin. 
Richard Goodwin. 


Naomi Potter. 
Mary Hall. 
Lydia I'otter. 


May 4, 1731. 
June 26, 1733. 
Oct. 18, 1735. 


1759. 
May 25, 1759. 
Dec. 8, 1757. 




Goshen, 

Chester Co.. 


Pa. 


21 


Jane Goodwin. 


Thomas Massey. 


Jan. 9, 1738. 


Dec. 22. 1774. 




Goshen, 

Chester Co., 


Pa. 


22 
23 
24 


Isaac Goodwin. 
Elizabeth (Joodwin. 
Sarah Goodwin. 


never married. 
Jesse Williams. 


Feb. 12, 1742. 
June 1, 1743. 
Apr. 1, 1746. 


May 5, 1774. 


died young. 


Goshen, 

Chester Co., 


Pa. 



170 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTKY. 
GENERATION XV. 



INDEX 

NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



BIRTH. 



MABniAGE. 



HESIDB.SCE. 



The Childben of Sarah Goodwin (XIV 4) and John Worball (XIV 1). 



XV 














25 


Elizabeth Worrall. 


John Salkeld. 


Mar. 20. 1715. 


Jan. 12, 1732. 






2G 


Mary Worrall. 




June 27, 1717. 




in infancy. 




27 


Peter Worrall. 




Oct. 26, 1719. 




July 7, 1722. 




28 


John Worrall. 


I. Priscilla Lewis. 
II. Eleanor Bennett. 


Oct. 26, 1719. 


I. Junel8,1741 
IL 


Jan. 5, 1800. 


Edgmont, 

Chester Co., Pa 


29 


Sarah Worrall. 


I. John Taylor. 
II. John Pierce. 


Sept. 19, 1722. 


I. 1744. 
IL about 1763 


Apr. 23, 1780. 


Thornbury, 

Chester, Fa 


30 


Thomas Worrall. 




Nov. 21, 1724. 




in infancy. 




31 


Peter Worrall. 


Abigail Pyle. 


1726. 


1750. 


1772. 


Middletown, 

Chester Co., Pa 


32 


Thomas Worrall. 


Mary Pierce. 


May 29. 1728. 


1750. 


about 1800. 




33 


Mary Worrall. 


Samuel Lewis. 


Feb. 24. 1731. 









The wife of John Goodwin (XV 3), Naomi Potter, was probably a sister 
of the wife of Richard Goodwin (XV 5). 

Richard Goodwin (XV 5) succeeded his father in the possession of the 
East Goshen lionicstcad. His wife, Lydia Potter, was a daughter of Abraham 
Potter, of Sussex county, Delaware. She was born November 18, 1738, and 
died January 22, 1810. They were married at Middletown Meeting. 

For an account of the Worralls (XV 10 to XV 18), see Worrall genealogy. 

The family is still largely living in East Goshen township, Chester county. 



THE OOODWIN FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE GOODWIN FAMILY. 



NOTKS. 



4 



T(IE GOOnWIN FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE GOODWIX FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE ROMAN FAMILY. 

One of the centers of the emigration which gave the first British colonists 
to Pennsylvania was in Wiltshire, England. The people there were largely 
of Saxon origin, and were mostly in moderate or in humble circumstances; 
their interests being chiefly as laborers, agriculturists, maltsters, and artisans, 
or small manufacturers. In this quiet community, where the average of intelli- 
gence and culture was not high — though there were many men of worth and 
some men of education there — the preaching of George Fox had a great imme- 
diate effect, and the faith of the "Society of Friends" gained many adherents. 

They were much harried and persecuted during the reign of Charles II, 
and when Penn inaugurated his "Holy Experiment" in Pennsylvania there 
were many persons in England who, smarting under oppression, and despairing 
of success at home, were eager to try their fortunes under more hopeful circum- 
stances in a more genial clime. 

Ralph Withers, of Bishop's Cannings, Wiltshire, who was the Deputy 
Treasurer of the Free Society of Traders, and a member of the first Provincial 
Council of Pennsylvania, and John Bezer, also of Bishop's Cannings, who was 
one of Penn's Commissioners, came to Penn's Colony in 1682, before Penn's 
own arrival, and the Romans, Cooles, Bezers and Kingsmans, with whom this 
narrative is chiefly concerned, who were all intimate friends in their old home, 
seem to have come out with him. 

A considerable number of letters — thirty-seven in all — that were written 
between 1683 and 1718, and mostly before the year 1700, by some of the 
friends of those emigrants who remained in England to their relatives in 
Pennsylvania, throw a good deal of light on the conditions of life in south- 
western England at the end of the seventeenth century, and give some details 
of family history. 

They contain much of the religious phraseology of the time, which doubt- 
less was sincere and heartfelt, but which grates somewhat on the taste of the 
present day. For several years the letters are despondent in tone, and con- 
tain much detail that is painful, and show an apprehension of worse to come. 
They are written in a script which is quite unlike the writing of the present 
day, a number of whose letters resemble the German letters rather than the 
English. This is worthy of remark, as the script of legal documents of the 
time is the same as ours now is. 

Two extracts will suffice to show some of the causes of this depression, 
and the way these plain people interpreted what they saw about them. The 
quotations are nearly literal, the spelling and the phraseology only being altered 
to some slight extent. Benjamin Coole writes thus to his brother-in-law, 
William Bezer, in America, from Goatacre, Wiltshire, September 2, 1683 — 
"As concerning the state of this our Nation, those that come over can give an 
account, but this I say : It is like a ship in the sea ^vithout an anchor, a fevered 
nation, a distressed nation, a distracted nation, and yet it is but the beginning 

171 



172 THE SMITH COLLATEEAI, ANCESTRY. 

of sorrows, for the judgments of God are in the land, and He is thinning it 
apace, both in towTi and city, calling many to their graves, some after one way 
and others after another. I heard but last week that there had died in Devizes 
about fifty persons in the small pox, and it multiplies greatly." 

And Thomas Norris writes thus from Preston, England, to Philip Roman, 
his wife's brother, under date of July 18, 1684, after giving details of the 
death and misfortune of a number of their mutual friends: "We have had a 
strange frosty winter. It began before Allhallow tide, and it was not out of 
the ground till Lady day. It was so extreme cold, and the frost so hard, that 
people did fear it would kill all the wheat, but it hath pleased the Lord to 
preserve some, and that doth prosper well on the groiuid. Laboring men and 
tradesmen could work but little during all that time. It was a fine spring for 
sowing of lent (i. e., lentil) crop, which did bloom very well. Then it pleased 
the Lord to send a blasting east wind and mildew, and a sort- of green worm 
like the hairy wonns which many do call palmer worms. Some do believe 
they were bred in the air. They came in great multitude, as thick on the 
ground as emmets in their hills, and they have eaten up most part of the pea.s 
and beans and garden stuff, insomuch that we did fear it would be little less 
than a famine with poor people. We hope the Lord hath stayed His hand, 
but it has made beans eight shillings a bushel ; wheat is not above six shillings, 
but all food is dear, especially cheese. We think food is almost as dear as it 
is with you, because of the frosty winter and the dry summer." 

This hard winter is apparently the same as that which Blackmore 
describes so graphically in "Lorna Doone." Lie says — "It was the longest 
winter ever known in our parts (i. e., Devonshire), never having ceased to 
freeze from the middle of Deceml)er till the second week in March." 

After two or three years of great hardship, the correspondence becomes 
more cheerful in tone, and is taken up largely with items of family history 
and of the business with which tlie English relatives were entrusted from time 
to time by their friends in Pennsylvania. 

Philip Komau is the central figure of this group as far as our family his- 
tory is concerned, his daughter Martha becoming, in Januaiy, 1695, the wife 
of Isaac Taylor, who was the great-grandfather of my great-grandmother, 
Mary Worrall Taylor, of Thombuiy, Delaware county, Pennsylvania. Some- 
thing of what will be stated here about him, and about the families with 
which he was allied, is only approximately accurate, as the lettei-s leave some 
parts obscure, but the narrative will be con-ect as to all important details. 

Lower, in his history of English Surnames, says that "the name 'Iloman' 
is the equivalent of 'Romaine,' and means of or belonging to Rome. Many of 
the name being French Huguenots came to England at the time of the revoca- 
tion of the Edict of Nantes in 1685." 



TKK KOMAN FAMILY. 
GENERATION XII. 



173 



IDBZ 
«0. 



HBMBBB OK FAUILT. 



MARRIAGE. 



RB8IDK.SCE. 



Philip Roman. 



Ann Roman. 
Isaac Roman. 
Jacob Roman. 
Abraham Roman. 
Ruth Roman. 



I. Martha Harper. 
II. Sarah Bezer. 

III. Amy Hardinp. 

IV. Dorothy Clayton, 
Thomas Norris. 

Joys. . 



about llUf). 



I. About 1669 
II. Jan. 5,1685 

III. Jiin.2t>,10!10 

IV. Feb.2o,171-l 



Jan. 11. 17aO. 

before 1711. 
1684. 



Marcus Hook, Pa. 
I're.ston, Kng. 
Wiltshire, Eng. 



Philip Roman (XII 1) was of Wiltshire, England, in which county a 
number of his relatives .spent the whole of their lives. He was born about 
1645, and emigrated to Pennsylvania, probably in 1682, settling at Marcus 
Hook, near Chester, Pa. His first recorded appearance at Chichester Meeting 
was in October, 1684, when he is the first signer of the minutes of the meeting. 

Dr. George Smith, in his history of Delaware county, says — "Philip 
Roman appears to have been a man of ability and exercised a good deal of 
influence both in the Society of Friends, of which he was a member, and also 
in the community. He was one of the Justices of the Court, and one year 
represented the Coimty of Chester in the Provincial Assembly." 

He was a member of the Assembly in 1692 and 1695, and was appointed 
a Justice of Chester county in 1698, and again in 1703. In those days the 
office of Justice was one of dignity. There were generally eight or ten 
appointed in such a county as Chester, holding office apparently dunng the 
term of the Governor, by whom they were appointed. 

They held quarterly sessions of the Court in Chester on the last day of 
the last week in February, May, August and November. Three Justices con- 
stituted a quorum and their jwwers were extensive. They had the various 
kinds of jurisdiction now^ exercised by all the lower Courts, as well as the 
power to appoint special officers, such as auditors, prothonotaries, etc An 
appeal could be made from their decisions to the Supreme Provincial Court, 
but the original judicial business of the province lay mainly in their hands. 
This remained practically the constitution of the County Courts until the year 
1755, when, as the population increased, and the business of the Courts became 
more complex, their organization was modified. 

In tiie Charter granted by William Penn to the Borough of Marcus Hook, 
September 17, 1701, Philip Roman is named as one of the two wardens of 
the annual fair and weekly market to be held in that town; and in the same 
year he is named as one of the trustees of the ground bought for the new 
county prison in Chester. 

He was a trustee of Chichester Friends Meeting, January 1, 1685; he 
subscribed £1 15s. out of a total subscription of £36 48. for building a new 



174 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

meeting house, and in 1689 he was again a subscriber to the building fund. 

Ilis name is found on the list of taxables in Lower Chichester township 
in 1715, and again in 1722, in which latter year his property was assessed as 
being of £80 value. 

A tract of 250 acres of land was surveyed to Philip Roman in Concord 
township, Delaware county, in February, 1683. This tract is shown on 
Thomas Holmes' "Map of the Improved parts of Pennsylvania," which was 
made about ten years after Penn's first arrival in the colony; but Philip Roman 
apparently never lived there. The fann on which he spent his life fronted 
on the Delaware river, and was bounded on one side by Chichester ci'eek. He 
also o\vned in 1715 land whose southeim boundary coincided with the southern 
botnidary of East Cain township, and was three miles west of the east ford 
of the Brandy wine. 

Philip Roman seems originally to have been of humble fortune. In the 
certificate of his second marriage, in 1685, he is described as a shoemaker. 

There remained in England of the Roman family — (2) a sister Ann 
Roman, married to Thomas Norris, living in Preston, Hampshire. They both 
died befoi-e 1711. Also brothers (3) Isaac Roman, who was living in 1685; 

(4) Jacob Roman, who was living in 1684, but who probably died in the latter 
part of that year, and his wife, Joys, who in 1685, married William Bayley. 

(5) Abraham Roman; and (6) a sister, Ruth Roman, who was married; but 
of all these people we know almost nothing. 

Philip Roman married about 1669 Martha Harper, who emigrated with 
him, in 1682, with eight children. Of these, three, with their mother, died 
in the fall of that year, probably of some malignant fever. Five children, 
two of whom were "little ones," survived and grew to maturity. These were 
all of the children of Philip Roman, there being none by his later marriages. 

Martha Harper's father was still living in 1684, but her mother died in 
April of that year. Their home was at Linham, Wiltshire, England. 

They had a son — (2) — Edward Harper, who was living at Linham in 
1684. He had a son named Thomas, born in February, 1684. 

Philip Roman's second wife was born Sarah Coole. She was a resident 
of Wiltshire, one of her brothers living at Goatacre, and another at Devizes, 
both in that county, at the time of her emigration to Pennsylvania in 1682. 
She had married in England, about 1674, W^illiam Bezer, who died in Decem- 
ber, 1683, leaving four children, Jason, who remained in England, probably 
with his grand parents, William, Sarah and Mary Bezer. She married Philip 
Roman January 5, 1685. 

On June 8, 1685, Philip Roman agreed in Chichester Meeting to give 
twenty-five acres of land, a part of William Bezer's holding — Sarah having 
extinguished her dower right therein — to the children left by William Bezer, 
the quit rents whereof were to be paid in their behalf till they came of age. 

Sarah lived but a short time after her mamage to Philip Roman, and 
dying, about 1688, left her children to his care, who so acquitted himself of 



THE ROMAN FAMILY. 175 

that charjje that Sarah's brother, Benjamin Coole, could say in a letter to him 
in 1691, "I take this opportunity to pay my grateful acknowledgments to thee 
for thy love, care and affection to my dear sister, when living, and to her 
tender children after her departure (for which the Almighty will be thy 
rewarder), wherein thou has justly merited the character of both merciful, 
honest and just." 

In Philip Roman's will, in 1728, he still remembered these children, and 
left £5 each to Sarah, wife of Samuel Grave, to whom she was married in 
May, 1702, and to William Harlan, son of Ezekiel Hai'lan and Mary, his wife, 
who were married in January, 1710, Sarah and Mary both being children of 
William Bezer. 

The family of Coole were all Quakers at a time when the sect was per- 
secuted in England, and for several years before the end of the reign of Charles 
II they were in distress. The letters of Benjamin Coole and William Coole, 
written in 1683 and 1684, are strongly tinctured by a deep religious depres- 
sion, as if there was a heavy weight hanging over their lives. In Febiiiary, 
1684, William writes to his sister Sarah that he has been imprisoned for eight 
weeks at Bridewell, and is expecting to be called for trial at the next assizes. 
Later letters show the pei'secution to be still more severe, "women and maids" 
being arrested at a meeting at Candlemas, 1685, and taken to jail, where some 
of them died, and where all of them remained until the assizes, when they 
were released "by reason the King dyed." Charles II died February 6, 1685. 
When James II came to the throne, the persecution of the Quakers practically 
ceased, as his policy was to unite them with the Catholics and the believers in 
the divine right of the Stuarts to govern England, in opposition to the Prot- 
estant and Constitutional party which had sent his father to the scaffold, and 
which was so soon to unseat James himself. 

From this time the correspondence takes a less depressed tone, and turns 
more to the affairs of this life. 

The mother of this family of C'ooles was living- at Devizes as late as 1691. 
Her children were — (1) Sarah Coole, who married William Bezer and Philip 
Roman. 

2. William Coole, who was a serge manufacturer of Devizes. The 
mother and unmarried sisters lived with him. He went to America apparently 
with his sister Sarah in 1682, and returned to England in 1683. He, as has 
been said already, was imprisoned as a Quaker in the winter of 1683-4. He 
married, probably about 1690, a woman of Atterbury, near Salisbury, England. 

3. Benjamin Coole, who was, perhaps, a preacher of the Society of 
Friends in early life, who lived at Goataere, Wiltshire. He was imprisoned 
for his faith in Fisherton jail. In 1691 he was living in prosperous circum- 
stances in Bristol, England, having married about 1689. He was then a much 
more cheerful man than the family correspondence first exhibits him. 

4. Susanna Coole — 5. Mary Coole — Both these women remained in 
England, and did not marry. 



176 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCE8TEY. 

6. Jean Coole emigrated with the Bezers, and toward the end of 1683 
married in America an Englishman of fortune, John Longworthy, an early 
settler of Radnor township, Delaware county, where he owned a large property. 
She had two children — (1), John Long-worthy, who, in 1711, married Mar- 
garet llichard, daughter of Rowland Richard, and — 

2. Eenjamin Long^vo^■thy. 

Jean must have died about 1711, as John Longworthy, in 1712, married 
Jane Englcbert. 

There was, in 1696, in England, a Thomas Coole who was a near relative 
of the family, but probably not a brother. 

Sarah Code's iirst husband (1), William Bezer, came to America in 1682, 
before the arrival of Penn, settled in Chichester township, and died alwut 
December, 1683. 

He had a brother (2), John Bezer, who was a maltster, of Bishop's Can- 
nings, Wiltshire. John was one of Penn's Commissioners to purchase land 
from the Indians, and to select a site for, and to lay out Penn's capital city, 
Philadelphia. He came over with his wife Susanna in the ship with his 
brother William, settled at Marcus Hook, and died in 1684, leaving four chil- 
dren, Susanna, Frances, John and Richard. His wife Susanna married, 
August, 1686, Nathaniel Lamplugh. 

John Bezer was a member of the first Legislative Assembly of Pennsyl- 
vania, which met February 20, 1683. His son Richard was, in 1693, a ward 
of Philip Roman. His widow died in 1693. 

(3) Edward Bezer, from Rowde, Wiltshire, who married in England, 
emigrated in the fall of 1683, and died in 1688. 

(4) Frances Bezer married, in 1667, Edward Brown, and remained in 
England. 

(5) Elizabeth Bezer married, in 1682, John Mason, of Pains wick, Glou- 
cestershire, England. 

Philip Roman's third wife was Amy Harding, widow of John Harding, 
both of Marlborough, Wiltshire. She was born Amy Kingsmau, married John 
Harding October 10, 1672, and they emigrated in 1682 to America, settling 
in Chichester township. John Harding died in 1688, and Amy married Philip 
Roman June 26, 1690. She died prior to 1713, leaving no children by cither 
marriage. Amy Harding bought, June .5, 1690, shortly before her marriage 
to Philip Roman, from James Brown, a tract in Chichester, between Marcus 
Hook and Middle Neck Rim, which Jirowai had bought February 26, 1682, 
from Morton Cornuteson, son of Cornute Mortonson. She had inherited an 
interest in John Harding's estate, and Philip Roman Irought from the other 
Harding heirs their reversionary interest in the pro}>erty. 

Her mother, whose maiden name was probably Dymer, died in England 
in October, 1689. Of this mother's children there wei'e 

1. Amy Kingsman, who married John Harding in 1672 and Philip 
Roman in 1690. 



THE KOMAiX FAMILY. 177 

2. John Kingsinan, Yt'Oinaii from Fifel, Wiltshire, who settled in Chi- 
chester township, Delaware county, as early as 1684; his first appearance at 
Chichester meeting being April 14, 1684. He married, January 15, 1685, 
Hannah, daughter of John Simcock, who, in the marriage notice, is classed as 
"sempstress," and died October 25, 1718. He subscribed, January 11, 1686, 
£2 5s. out of a fund of £o('> 4s. to build a house for Chichester Meeting. He 
died in 1721. His children were — 

Elizabeth Kingsman, born November 6, 1685, married November 20, 
1704, John Dutton. 

John Kingsman, born July 4, 1688, and Hannah Kingsman, born Janu- 
ary 26, 1690. 

(3) Eobert Kingsman, who died in England "in the week after Whitsun 
Week," 1697. 

(4) Mary Kingsman, who married Richard Walter, and lived at Stan- 
ton Barnard, Wiltshire, England, in 1697. 

Amy Kingsman's husband, John Harding, seems to have been a man of 
considerable possessions in England. Before emigrating he sold his landed 
estate there to William Hitchcock, a maltster of Marlborough, Wiltshire, who 
was a relative of Harding, and probably a brother-in-law. Harding controlled, 
also, the living of Badborough. He was a member of the first Legislative 
Assembly of Pennsylvania, which met February 20, 1683, and was also a 
member of Assembly in 1685. He died about the end of the year 1688, and 
left his property in America, a farm of 242 acres, probably in Chichester town- 
ship, to his brother William, charged with the rights of his widow Amy. 
Philip Roman bought the rights of the English heirs to this property. Amy 
Harding promised in meeting, ilay 12, 1690, before marrying Philip Roman, 
to jjcrforni her former husband's will concerning his and her relatives. 

John Harding's mother died October, 1689. Besides (1) John Hard- 
ing, she had a son (2) William, who remained in Preston, Hampshire, England, 
and died in 1705, and daughters — (3) Hannah, and (4) Margaret, who were 
living in England unmarried in 1718. 

Closely connected with these gi'oups of persons were the brothers William, 
Thomas and Edward Bayley, who remained in England. They were cousins 
of Philip Roman, and his frequent correspondents. 

William Bayley, whose wife Jane died in 1684, married, in 1685, Philip 
Roman's sister-in-law, Joys, the widow of his brother Jacob. 

Edward Bayley died in England before 1711. 

Philip Roman seems to have relied on all of these brothers to do business 
for him in England. They lived in Pickwick, Wiltshire. 

John Harris and Edward Harris are also mentioned several times in the 
correspondence. It was from John Harris, Jr., and his uncle Edward Harris 
that Philip Roman bought, in 1701, the right of the elder John Harris, to 
locate 1,000 acres of land in Pennsylvania. I have supposed one of them and 
one of the Bayleys to have been my ancestors, but I am not sure of this, nor 



178 THE SMITH COLLATEEAL ANCESTRY. 

does their relationship to Philip Roman clearly appear. John Harris, Jr., 
and his wife died shortly before 1715. 

After Amy Roman's death Philip Roman married, February 18, 1714, 
Dorothy Clayton, a daughter of William Clayton, Jr., who had married Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Edward Bezer, in 1682, and lived in Chichester, Delaware 
Co. She was therefore a niece of Philip Roman's second wife, Sarah Bezer. 
She was quite a young woman at the time of her marriage to Philip Roman, 
who was then about 69 years of age. Before her marriage he conveyed a por- 
tion of his real estate to trustees to secure her dower, having bought land of 
Hans Oclson, one of the original Swedish grantees. Her father, William 
Clayton, Jr., had emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1697, and settled at Marcus 
Hook. William Clayton, Jr., was one of Governor Markhani's Council, and 
held the same position afterward under Penn's own government. He was a 
Justice of the Court of Upland county, Delaware, and afterwards a Justice of 
Chester county, presiding at the first court held in Pennsylvania under the 
Proprietary Government. He died in 1691. 

After Philip Roman's death, in 1730, Dorothy was married again to 
Mordecai Maddock, of Springfield, Delaware Co. He was the oldest son of 
Henry Maddock, of Loom Hall, in Cheshire, England, and his wife, Sarah 
Kenerly.- Henry Maddock and his brother-in-law, James Kenerly, purchased 
1,500 acres of laud from William Penn. He came from Cheshire, England, 
in 1681. 

He returned to England in 1690, but came over again in 1702, and finally 
came to this country in 1727 with Sai-ah, his wife, and several children. One 
of them, Jane, man-ied George Maris (XIII 2) in 1690. 

He was a member of Assembly in 1684 and 1686. 

Philip Roman's will was made jSTovember 25, 1728, and proved January 
21, 1730. It provides for his wife Dorothy. It gives his son Philip his 
plantation of 205 acres in Chichester, he paying to his daughter Martha, late 
wife of Isaac Taylor, £30, and to his son Jonah £10. To his son Jacob he 
gives his messuages, land, etc., in Chester, which he bought of John Child, 
"and what he owes me." 

To his son, Jonah, he gives his tract in Cain township, containing 170 
acres, he not to sell without the consent of his sons Philip and Jacob, and his 
grandson, John Taylor, the object being to secure the land for the benefit of 
Jonah's children, Jonah, Joshua, Rachel and Mary. 

To his daughter Martha he gives £120. 

To his grandsons, William and Thomas, sons of Robert Roman, £20 each 
on their reaching the age of 21. 

To his grandson, John Taylor, he gi%'es £5. 

To Sarah, wife of Samuel Grave, and daughter of William Bezer, 
deceased, £5. 

To William Harlan, son of Ezekiel and Mary, his wife, who was a daugh- 
ter of the said William Bezer, £5. 



THE ROMAN FAMILY. 



179 



The remainder to Philip Roman, and his grandson, John Taylor, who 
were his executors. 

GENERATION XIII. 



roBX 

HO. 



2:embeb of familt. 



MARRIAGE. 



BSSIDBNCE. 



The Children of Philip Roman (XII 1) and Martha Habper. 



:iii 

1 
2 
3 

15. G 
7 
8 



Philip Itom.Tn. 
Robert Roman. 
Martha Roman. 
Three children. 
Jonah Roman. 
Jacob Roman. 



Mary. 

Hannah Poe. 
Isaac Taylor. 

Ruth Pennock. 
Mary Barnard. 



about 1(!70. 
about 1672. 
about 1674. 

16S0. 
1682. 



Oct. 31, 1716. 
Jan., 1695. 

Nov. 12, 1713. 
Nov., 1712. 



Oct. 10, 


1730. 


Jan., 


1718. 


Jan., 


173.'-). 




1683. 


before 


1745. 


Nov., 


174S. 



Philadelphia, Pr, 

Thornbury, Pa. 

Cain Twp., Pa. 



Chester, 



&a.^ 



Philii> Roman (XIII 1) and Robert Roman (XIII 2) are connected in 
a curious piece of history. The records of Concord Friends' Meeting show 
that they were reported in 1695 to be students of astrology and other forbidden 
mysteries. Where they learned these arts is not known, unless their relative, 
Jacob Taylor, who was an expert in astronomy, and doubtless knew something 
of what M-as then considered the kindred art of astrology, may have given them 
lessons in it. Astrology was greatly in vogue in England at that time. Wil- 
liam Lilly, who died in 1681, called himself an astrologer and a prophet. He 
claimed to have foretold the great plague of 166.5, and the great fire in London 
in 1666, and to have foreseen the fate of Charles I; and he was for a time 
pensioned by Parliament for giving information to the Government; so that 
sensible men might think the study worthy of attention. 

The records of the Concord monthly meeting, commencing November 11, 
1695, state that — "some friends having a concern upon them concerning some 
yotmg men which came amongst friends, to their meetings, and following some 
arts which friends thought not fit for such as professed truth to follow, viz. : 
astrology and other arts, such as geomancy and chiromancy and necromancy, 
etc., it was debated, and the sense of this meeting is. that the study of these 
sciences brings a veil over the understanding and a death upon the life." 

"And the same friends order that Philip Roman be spoken to, to know 
whether he have dealt orderly with his two sons concerning the same art, and 
that his two sons be spoken to, to come to the next monthly meeting." 

John Kingsman, the brother of Amy Roman, and William Hughes were 
directed to cite the father and his two sons to appear. Dec(>mbcr 9, 1695, it 
was reported that Philip Roman, and his brother, Robert Roman, had been 
spoken to about the arts and sciences referred to. "They seemed to diso^vn 
them except astrology. After much discussion they expressed their willingness 
to abandon its practice, if they could be convinced that it was evil." 



18(' THK SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

January 13, 1696, Nicholas Newlin and Jacob (JhandlfT. who had been 
appointed to labor with the Itomans, reported to the monthly meeting tliat after 
much argument — ''Philip concluded with us that he did not know that he 
should use that art of astrology again, for he had denied several that came to 
him to be resolved of their questions already." "Robert promised the same, 
but with this reserve, unless it was to do some great good by it, from which 
belief of some gi-eat good we could not remove him." 

March (», 169G, Philip Roman, Sr., presented an acknowledgment, con- 
demning his son's behavior, and his o^vn for taking their parts at first. 

May 11, 1090, Philip Roman, Jr., made an acknowletlgment to the meet- 
ing, but Robert- was disowned "for consulting with a stall' and such like things." 

The Chester Quarterly Meeting next took the matter u]>, and severely con- 
demned all such practices. It then came before the Grand Jui-y of Chester 
county, who presented Robert Roman, of Chichester township, "for practicing 
geomancy according to Hidon, and for divining l>y a stick." They also pre- 
sented the following books — "Hidon's Temple of Wisdom, which teaches 
geomancy, and Scott's Discovery of Witchcraft, and Cornelius AgTippa, which 
teaches necromancy." 

The end of it all was that Robert Roman appeai-ed in Court, and siibmitted 
himself to the mercy of the Bench. He was ordered to pay a fine of five 
pounds, and all charges, "and never practice the arts, but behave himself well 
for the futui-e, and he promised to do so, whereupon he is discharged for this 
time." 

The family correspondence shows Philip, Jr., in England in May, 1697, 
and again in April, 1700, having some business to transact there for his father. 
He is spoken of by his nephew, John Taylor (XIV 20), himself a physician, 
as Dr. Philip Roman, so that his studies had not been wholly wasted in the 
pursuit of the occult sciences. He probably received his medical training in 
England. He received, in 1730, the home farm of 205 acres in Chichester 
from his father, and was his residuary legatee and his principal executor, but 
he died the same year. 

Philip Roman, Robert Roman, and Jonah Roman appear on the list of 
holders of real estate in Lower Chichester township for 1715. 

Martha Roman (XIII 3) was born in England about 1674, and emigrated 
when she was eight years old. No note of her further history has been pre- 
served, except her marriage to Isaac Taylor in 1694, and her death in Thorn- 
bury township in January, 1735. She received by her father's will £30 and 
£120. Her son, John Taylor, was ap])ointed administrator of her will Janu- 
ary 24, 1735. 

Robert Roman (XIII 2) was married in the First Presbyterian church 
of Philadelphia, which makes it probable that his early experience with Con- 
cord Friends' Meeting alienated him from the Society of Friends. January 
22, 1718, Jacob Roman (XIII 8) was appointed administrator of Robert's 



THE ROMAN FAMILY. I'^l 

estate, Hannah, the widow, rcnomifing the duty. It is probahle that the 
three children of Philip Roman (XII 1), who died in 1683, came after 
Ilobert and before Jonah and Jacob, as the two last-named are several times 
spoken of in the family correspondence as ''little ones," and as if a gap 
separated them from the older children. 

Jonah Roman (XIII 7), by an agreement made February .'3, 1713, was 
to come into possession, after his father's death, of his farm of 205 acres, 
bounded on two sides by Delaware river and Chichester creek. He received 
£10 by his father's will. He apparently was not well doing, as he was pro- 
hibited by his father's will from selling the farm left to him of 170 acres in 
Cain township, without the consent of his brothers, it being left as the heritage 
of Jonah's children. 

Jacob Roman (XIII 8) was assessed in Chester in 1722 as having land 
valued at £50. In 1748 he lived one and one-half miles northeast of the bridge 
over Chichester creek, on the road between Philadelphia and New Castle. He 
received, by his father's will, the messuages, land, etc., in Chester bought of 
John Child and "what he owes me." His wife seems to have survived him, 
as she was his administratrix December 1, 1748. 

His wife, Mary Barnard, was a daughter of Richard Barnard, who left 
Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, in his youth, before 1683, and settled in Mid- 
dletown, Delaware county. He owned land near Chester, Pa., in 1683, and 
was a grand juror in 1686. Richard Barnard and his wife Frances lived near 
Chester. They had seven children: Richard, Thomas, Sarah, Mary, Lucy, 
Lydia and Rebecca. Richard Barnard, Sr., died before May 5, 1698. His 
son Richard, bom 1684, married, about 1715, Ann Taylor, daughter of Abiah 
Taylor. Recent investigations seem to indicate Wiltshire as Richard Barnard's 
English home. 

The name Barnard is said to be taken from Roche Barnard, a fortified 
Manor house in Normandy, France. 



182 



THE SMITH COLLATEEAL ANCESTET. 
GENERATION XIV. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBBB OF FAMILY. 



MABBIAGE. 



BE8IDENCB. 



XIV 
1 



Mary Roman. 
Ruth Roman. 



The Children of Philip Roman (XIII 1) and Maey. 



unmarried. 

I. Erasmus Morton. 
II. Fletcher. 



I. Aug. 29, 1730. 

II. before 1751. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



3 
4 



The Children of Robert Roman (XIII 2) and Hannah Poe. 



William Roman. 
Thomas Roman. 



1717. 
1718. 



The Children of Martha Roman (XIII 3) and Isaac Taylor. 



5 


John Taylor. 


I. Mary Worrilow 

Baker. 
11. Elizabeth Moore. 


1698. 


I. Sep. 10,1718. 
II. Oct., 1734. 


1756. 


Thornbury Twp., 
Pi 

Whiteland Twp., 

Pi 


6 


Jacob Taylor. 


Grace Worrilow. 


about 1700. 


Oct. 13, 1728. 


1746. 


7 
8 


Philip Taylor. 
Ann Taylor. 


never married. 

I. Samuel Savage, 

Jr. 
II. George Taylor. 

I. Harry Young. 
II. Samuel Brogon. 


about 1702. 
about 1705. 


I. 1733. 


about 1749. 





Mary Taylor. 


about 1706. 


I. about 1733. 
II. about 1737. 







10 

11 

12 
13 



Jonah Roman. 
Joshua Roman. 

Rachel Roman. 
Mary Roman. 



The Children of Jonah Roman (XIII 7) and Ruth Pennock. 



Ruth . 

Rachel Pyle. 

unmarried. 
Robert Pyle. 



Aug., 1746. 
Sept., 1746. 



1756. 
Feb., 1764. 

before 1745. 
1747. 



East Cain Twp., 



P« 



The Children of Jacob Roman (XIII 8) and Mary Barnard. 



14 


Hannah Roman. 


Jacob Carter. 




1741. 




1 


15 


Jacob Roman. 






about 1753. 


177S. 


Chester Twp., Pa. 


16 


Mary Roman. 


John Mcllvain. 




1754. 


before 1761. 


Ridley Twp., Pa. 


17 


lanac Roman. 


Hannah Roman. 


about 1722. 


Jan. 17, 1759. 


Mar. 25, 1819. 


W. Fallowfield 

Twp., Pa 


18 


Abraham Roman. 


never married. 






before 1755. 




19 


Philip Roman. 


never married. 


about 1729. 




Mar. 23, 1816. 


W. Fallowfield 

Twp., Pa 


20 


Martha Roman. 


never married. 






1784. 


Chester, Pa. 


21 


Rebecca Roman. 


never married. 






before 1755. 





THE ROMAN FAMILY. 183 

By deed of September 27, 1751, Mary Roniau (XIV 1), of the city of 
Philadelphia, siugle woman, and Ruth Fletcher (XIV 2), of the same place, 
widow, daughters and only children and heirs of Philip Roman, late of the 
said city, Practitioner of Physick, deceased, conveyed to William Howell, of 
Chichester, shipwright, 16 acres of land on the east side of Chichester creek, 
just south of the King's road. 

William Roman (XIV 3) and Thomas Roman (XIV 5) were left, in 
1728, by the will of their grandfather, Philip Roman, £20 each on their arrival 
at the age of 21. 

For account of children of Martha Roman (XIV 5 to XIV 9) see Taylor 
genealogy. 

Joshua Roman's (XIV 11) will, February 7, 1764, leaves sons Joseph 
and Absalom 10s. each; sons Joshua and Benjamin his real estate — rents to 
use of daughters Rachel and Sarah till sons reach age of 21 years. Executor — 
trusty and lawful wife Rachel Roman. 

October 5, 1741, Hannah Roman (XIV 14), was disowned by Chichester 
Meeting because marriage ceremony was performed by priest. 

Isaac Roman (XIV 17) and Philip Roman (XIV 19) deeded to Erasmus 
Morton 15 acres of land in Chichester township adjoining other lands of 
Morton. 

Erasmus Morton was a son of Marten Knutson. He was married at Old 
Swedes church, Wilmington, Delaware, to Ruth Roman August 29, 173C. She 
was, perhaps, the daughter of Philip, and married later to a Fletcher. 

The Roman family will not l>e followed further here. It removed in 
later generations northward and westward. Some of them lived in East Cain 
township before and during the Revolutionary War. There are still living 
persons bearing the name in W^estern Chester county and in Maryland. In 
1754 the family had been largely disconnected with the Society of Friends. 



12* 



I 



THE ROMAN FAMII.Y. 



NOTES. 



THE ROMAN FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE ROMAX FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE EOMAN FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE MARIS FAMILY. 

GENERATION XII. 



INDBX 
NO. 


HBMBEB OF FAMILY. 


CONBOBT. 


BIBTH. 


MABBIAOB. 


DEATH. 


RBSIDBNCB. 


XII 

1 George Maris. 


Alice. 


1632. 


about 1659. 


Jan. 15, 1706. 


Springfield Twp., 

Del. Co., Pa. 



George Maris (XII 1) lived in the parish of Inkboroiigh, Worcestershire, 
England. He belonged to the Society of Friends, of which, says Dr. Smith, 
in his history of Delaware county, he was one of the most eminent preachers. 
He suflFered persecution for his faith. In 1670, when living at Grafton Fly- 
ford, he had goods of the value of £20 taken from him for having a meeting 
at his house. He was sent to prison July 23, 1670, and was kept there eight 
months without knowing the charge against him. All of his children were 
born before his emigration in 1683. Soon after his arrival, in 1683, he settled 
in the northern part of Springfield township, Delaware county, about a mile 
south of the northern angle, naming his residence there "The Home House." 

He held many public trusts in Pennsylvania, was a Justice of the Court 
from 1684 to 1689, and from 1691 to 1693; a member of Assembly from 
1684 to 1688, and from 1690 to 1693; and a member of the Provincial Council 
in 1695. 

His wife died March 11, 1699. 

GENERATION XIII. 
The Children of Geoboe Maris (XII 1) and Auce. 




The husband of Alice Maris (XIII 1), Jacob Simcock, was a son of John 
and Elizabeth Simcock. John Simcock, Dr. Smith says, was one of William 
Penn's most trusted advisers, one of the largest purchasers in England of Penn- 
sylvania lands, having located 2,875 acres of land east of Ridley creek, back of 
a line of Swedish settlements on the Delaware river, a member of Penn's Council 
from 1682 to 1690, a member of Assembly, and, at times. Speaker of the 

185 



186 XHK SMITH COLLATERAL AXCESTKY. 

Assembly ; one of the Commissioners to treat with Lord Baltimore, and Deputy 
President of the Free Society of Traders. He was a very influential Quaker 
preaeher. He suffered in England for his faith, having been imprisoned fifteen 
months and having been fined several hundred pounds. He visited, in the serv- 
ice of the Friends, ilaryland, Virginia and New England. His English home 
was at Kidley, in Cheshire, and he gave the name of "Ridley" to the township 
in which he settled in Pennsylvania. He was born in 1630, and died March 
7, 1703. 

His sou, Jacob Simcock, was also a Quaker preacher and a traveling min- 
ister. He was Deputy Register General under Jauu>s Claypole in 1886, and 
lived probably in Philadelphia for a short time. He rcuioved to Abington about 
1730, and died alwut 1737. 

George Maris (XIII 2) was a member of Assembly in 1717. His first 
wife, Jane ]\Iaddock, who died August 28, 170.5, was a daughter of Henry Mad- 
dock, and a sister of Mordecai :\[addock, Sr. Henry Maddock was of Loom 
Hall, Cheshire, England. He and his brother-in-law, James Kenerly, Iwught 
of William Penn f,500 acres of land in Pennsylvania in 1681. He reached 
Pennsylvania some time before Penn in 1(582. He retunied to England. 

His second wife, Jane Hayes, was the widow of Jonathan Hayes of 
Marple, born Jane Rees, daughter of Edward Rees, of Merion township; 
who was Member of Assembly in 1717, and died in 1753. 

The husband of Elizabeth Maris (XIII 3), John Mendenliall, of Con- 
cord, came to Pennsylvania from the neighborhood of the Manor of Milden- 
hall, Wiltshire, England, in 1683, with brothers Benjamin and George, and 
was one of the earliest settlers in Concord. His family name was originally 
Mildenhall. In l(i!)7 he gave to the Society of Friends the land on which 
Concord meeting house was built. After his wife's death he married, in 
1708, Esther Dicks, widow of Peter Dicks. He was one of the original pro- 
prietors of the first mill built in Concord township. 

Ann Maris (XIII 4) was married at the house of Bartholomew Coppock, 
Jr., in Springfield township, Delaware county, Pennsylvania. F<:>r an account 
of her husband, see Worrilow genealogy. 

John Maris (XIII 5) inherited "The Home House," and lived there. 
His wife was of Haverford township, Delaware county. They were married 
at Haverford Meeting. He was a Member of Assembly in 1700. 1712, 1716, 
1719 and 1720. 

Richard Maris (XIII 6) was a Member of Assembly in 1714. His wife, 
Elizabeth Hayes, was a daughter of Jonathan and Aim Hayes, of Marple 



THE MARIS FAMILY. 



187 



township, Delaware county. She died October 9, 1720. Jonathan Hayes 
settled in Marple township as early as 1684. He was much the largest land- 
holder there. He was a Justice of the Court from 1692 to 1710, and a Member 
of Assembly in 1689 and 1697. 



GENERATION XIV. 



INDES 
NO. 



MEMBER OF FAMILY. 



RB8IDBNCB. 



The Children of Alice Maris (XIII 1) and Jacob Simcock. 



XIV 














1 


John Simcock. 


Mar.v Wain. 


Sept. 23. 1685. 


1706. 


Apr. 23, 1773. 




2 


Jacob Simcock. 


Sarah Wain. 


Sept. 25, 1G86. 


1711. 


about 1716. 




3 


Mary Simcock. 


Joseph Harvey. 


Jan. 4, 1689. 


1708. 






4 


Benjamin Simcock. 


Hannah Hodges. 


Nov. T). 1690. 


1712. 






5 


Hannah Simcock. 


John Iden. 


July 2.'!, 1692. 


Mar. 1.5, 1721. 


Feb. 2. 1744. 




6 


Sarah Simcock. 


Samuel Worthington. 


Aug. 7, 1696. 


1716. 




Salem, N. J. 



The Children of Georoe Maris (XIII 2) and Jane Maddock. 



7 

8 

9 

10 



Mordecai Maris. 
George Maris. 
Hannah Maris. 
Esther Maris. 



never married. 

John Owen. 
Mordecai Taylor. 



Sept. 22, 1691. 
Nov. 25, 1694. 
Feb. 17, 1699. 
Apr. 24, 1703. 



Oct. 22, 1719. 



May 



8, 1696. 
1752. 



The Children or Euzabeth Marls (XIII 3) and John Mendenhall. 



11 
12 
13 



George Mendenhall. 
John Mendenhall. 
Aaron Mendenhall. 



never married. 
Susanna Pierson. 
Rose Pierson. 



Aug. 14, 1686. 

June 3, 1688. 1709. 

Nov. 20, 1600. June 16, 1715. 



1758. 
June 30, 1765. 



East Cain Twp. 



The Children of Ann Maris (XIII 4) and John Worrilow. 



14 

15 
16 


Mary Worrilow. 

Walter Worrilow. 
Alic-e Worrilow. 


I. Joseph Baker, Jr. 
II. John Taylor, 
never married. 
Peter Yarnall. 


Jan. 9, 1692. 

Mar. 12, 1696. 
May 6, 1698. 


I. Mayl8,1709 
II.Sept.10,1718 

171.5. 


about 17.33. 


Thornhury, Del. Co. 
Willistown, 


17 
18 
19 


Sarah Worrilow. 
Thomas Worrilow. 
Anne Worrilow. 


Nicholas Pyle. 
Susanna Taylor, 
never married. 


July 12, 1700. 
Apr. 16, 1702. 
May 31, 1705. 


Dec. 7, 1721. 
1726. 




Chester Co. 
Concord, Del. Co. 

Thornbury, Del. Co. 


20 


Jane Worrilow. 


George Whippo. 


June 23, 1707. 


July 23. 1726. 




Willistown, 


.21 


Grace Worrilow. 


Jacob Taylor. 


Aug. 9, 1710. 


Oct. 13, 1728. 


about 1745. 


Chester Co. 
Whiteland, 

Chester Co. 



188 



THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTEY. 
GENERATION XIV. 



INDEX 
NO. 



MEMBEB or FAMILY. 



BIBTH. 



MABBIAQE. 



BBSIDBNCK. 



The Children of John Maris (XIII 5) and Susanna Lewis. 



XIV 

22 



23 
24 
25 

26 
27 

28 
29 

30 

31 
32 



George Maris. 



Sarah Maris. 
Alice Maris. 
Mary Maris. 

Ilannah Maris. 
Susanna Maris. 

Jaue Maris. 
Katharine Maris. 

John Maris. 

James Maris. 
Elizabeth Maris. 



I. Sarah Levig. 

II. Ilannah Massey. 
III. Mary Busby. 

IV. Ann Lownes. 
John Bennett. 
Jesse Jacob Bourne. 
Joseph Taylor. 

Michael Harlan. 

1. Daniel James. 
II. John Davis. 



I. 



Willis. 



II. John Pusey. 
Katharine Bound 

Hayden. 



Aug. 31, 1694. 



Mar. 31, 1097. 
Mar. 11, 1()99. 
Mar. 9, 1700. 



Oct. 
July 



5. 1702. 

6, 1704. 



Aug. 9, 1705. 

July 8, 1707. 

Jan. 15, 1710. 

Apr. 28, 1711. 

Feb. 12, 1714. 



! I. Mavl9,1720 
I II. Dec. 1725 
III. Sept. 1730 
I IV. Nov. 1732 
: Sept. 17. 1719. 
[Aug. 10, 1721. 
iXov. 29, 1722. 

1724 or 1725. 

11. Oct.30,174C. 



about 1760. 



Oct. 21, 1720. 



May 19, 1792. 

Oct. 15, 1720. 
Oct. 9. 1720. 



Springfield, Twp. 



Birmingham Twp. 
Maryland. 
Marlborough Twp,, 
Chester C5o. 



The Children of Richard Maris (XIII 6) and Elizabeth HArES. 



33 


Jonathan Maris. 


I. Jane Lownes. 
II. Ann Wain. 


Mar. 16, 1702. 


I. Junel9,172a 
II. 1753. 


about 1780. 




34 


Mary Maris. 


John Bartram. 




Apr. 2.0, 1723. 


1727. 


Philadelphia. Pa. 


35 


Elizabeth Maris. 


James Bartram. 




Sept. 30, 1725. 






3« 


Ann Maris. 


David Llewellyn. Jr. 




May 24. 1739. 






37 


Joseph Maris. 


Ann Shipley. 




Jan. 21, 1742. 


Nov. 16, 1758. 





John Simcock (XIV 1). His wife, Mary Wain, was a daughter of 
Nicholas Wain, of Philadelphia. She and Sarah Wain, wife of Jacob Sim- 
cock, were sisters, as was Hannah (Wain) Hodges, the wife of Benjamin 
Simcock. 



Mary Simcock (XIV 3). Her husband, Joseph Harvey, was of Ridley 
township, Delaware county. 

Hannah Simcock (XIV 5). Her husband, John Iden, was of Falls town- 
ship, Bucks county. They were married at Springfield meeting house. She 
was a Quaker preacher. She was born Hannah Wain and was first married 
to Hodges. 

Sarah Simcock (XIV 6). She and her husband moved to Salem, N. J., 
November 2G, 1722. 



THE MARIS FAMILY, 189 

Hannah Maris (XIV 9). Her husband, John Owen, was a son of 
Robert Owen, of Merion township. Hannah died in Chester township. 

Esther Maris (XIV 10). Her husband, Mordecai Taylor, was of Spring- 
field township, Delaware county. 

George Mendenhall (XIV 11) was a miller. 

John Mendenhall (XIV 12). His wife, Susanna Pierson, was a daughter 
of Thomas and Rose Pierson, of Concord township. John settled in East 
Cain township, Chester county, near the Quaker meeting house. In 1713 the 
family moved to Lancaster county, and in 1717 they went to Hopewell Monthly 
Meeting, in Virginia. 

Aaron Mendenhall (XIV 13). His wife, Rose Pierson, was a sister to 
Susanna Pierson, wife of John Mendenhall. They settled in East Cain town- 
ship, where he died. Rose died March 21, 1771, in her 78th year. 

(XIV 14 to XIV 21.) For accounts of the children of Ann Maris (XIII 
4) and John Worrilow, see Worrilow record. 

George Maris (XIV 22). His wife, Sarah Levis, was a daughter of 
Samuel Levis. They were married at Springfield meeting house. His second 
wife, Hannah Massey, was a daughter of Thomas Massey. His third wife, 
Mary Eusby, was the widow of Joseph Busby, of Goshen township; and 
his fourth wife, Ann Lownes, was a daughter of George Lownes, and a sister 
of Jane Lownes, the wife of Jonathan Maris (XIV 33). George Maris 
owned and lived at the "Home House," of which he built the main part in 
1722. His will was probated December 24, 1760. 

Mary Maris (XIV 25). Her husband, Joseph Taylor, was of Spring- 
field township. They settled in Marlborough township, Chester county. The 
property has always remained in the possession of the male descendants of 
the family, and is, or was lately the jiropcrty of Maris C. Taylor. 

Jonathan Maris (XIV 33). His first wife, Jane Lownes, was a sister 
of Ann Lo\vnes, the fourth wife of George Maris (XIV 22). His second 
wife was a daughter of Richard Wain, of North Wales, Montgomery coiinty, 
Pa. He was a Quaker preacher. 

Mary Maris (XIV 34). Her husband, John Bartram, was the earliest 
of American botanists, and the first to establish a botanic garden in America. 
He was the eldest son of William Bartram, and a grandson of John Bartram. 
John Bartram was born in Darby township, Delaware county, March 23, 



190 THE SMITH COLLATERAL ANCESTRY. 

1699. After the death of his first wife, Mary Maris, he married, in 1729, 
Ann, daughter of Benjamin Mendenhall. John Bartram died September 22, 
1777, his last days being troubled by the fear that the British, who had 
just won the Battle of the Brandywine, would destroy his darling botanical 
garden. 

Auu Maris (XIV 36) was married at Spring-field meeting house. She 
left no children. 

Joseph Maris (XIV 37). His wife, Ann Shipley, was a daughter of 
William aud Mary Shipley. She was born in Leicestershire, England, and 
died in Pennsylvania, April 10, 1780. 



ry ^D .5* 



■A 



THE MARIS FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



THE MARIS FAMILY, 



NOTFS. 



THE MARIS FAJriLY. 



NOTES. 



THE MAKIS FAMILY. 



NOTES. 



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